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Letha Wilson’s Photography As Sculpture

Letha Wilson slices, dices, and combines materials to create hybrid images that tether between the the world of reproduction and  3D representation.

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New Work by Jan Kalwejt

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Jan Kalwejt, who contributed the amazing “Lung Music” shirt has a bunch of new works up on his site. Check ’em out!

 

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Suiren

Am I crazy or is this video by Tomoya Kimpara gross, beautiful, and slightly pornographic? Watch the full video after the jump and let me know!

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Justin Walker’s Thighs and Pistols

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Photographer Justin Walker‘s studio photos of guns, food, and thighs (both human and chicken) are cold and slick in the best of ways.

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Jacopo Rosati’s Felt Collage Illustrations

Venice, Italy-based artist/illustrator Jacopo Rosati does these felt collage illustrations that are really cool. Rosati, whose clients include -among others- Wired Magazine, The Wall Street Journal, and Geico, has a nice sense of color. Each piece really pops and the felt adds a unique texture to his work. The images are so subtle, but they communicate everything they need to through the artist’s clever, economical character design. The superhero piece (above) is especially great. (via)

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Jesse Greenberg’s Urethane Plastic Sculptures

Jesse Greenberg lives and works in New York City. He utilizes a wide variety of materials to create foreboding structures that reference the natural world as well as the artificial. The majority of his work is made from plastic and displayed so that viewers may touch what they see as the tactility of the work adds to the experience. Greenberg takes a cheap mass produced material that many take for granted and morphs it into deteriorated monuments that comment on consumption and decay.

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Bara Prasilova’s Surreal And Playful Photography Uses Hair As A Prop

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Bara Prasilova‘s photography is both playful and disturbing. She uses soft pastels with pops of neon color to evoke feelings of nostalgia and innocence; simultaneously, she hints at themes of restraint and constriction. In her project for the Hasselblad Masters Book, she’s chosen to explore the theme of “evolve.” Her prop of choice is hair: a natural material that she portrays in a surreal and absurd fashion.

In one photograph, a woman jumpropes with a long Rapunzel-esque whip of hair; in another, a thick braid wrapped around a woman’s neck looks suffocating yet elegant. Prasilova explains:

“Through my photographs, I have been trying to understand human relationships and connections: long hair symbolises the invisible strings we use to strap somebody to us or, perhaps, the opposite, to let somebody loose. They are the threads of our emotions, worries and fears that we are afraid to loosen like hair.” (via I Need a Guide)

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Allison L. Wade Turns Her Own Break-Up Text Messages Into Art

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Breaking up is hard to do. And, if executed via text message, it can be even harder.

In her solo exhibition, “It’s Not You,” artist Allison L. Wade explores the proliferating plague of the break-up text. Featuring much-anticipated new additions to her acclaimed series, “Break-Up Texts,” this exhibition once again draws inspiration from the artist’s own love life.

Presented as blocks of text set against painted and photographic backdrops, the text messages featured in “It’s Not You” include those both “sent and received by the artist during dissolving personal relationships.” Citing irony as the basis of her series, Wade’s seemingly arbitrary selection of backdrops—spanning solid, lurid colors, computer-generated gradients, and peculiar images lacking context—emphasize the level of detachment present in the modern-day break-up text.

By pairing emotionally-charged, life-changing words with generic, ambivalent backgrounds, Wade successfully demonstrates the inherent disconnect between break-up texts and the emotions that prompt them.

While some of the text messages featured in “It’s Not You” are bizarrely comical (“Sorry I have been out of touch this week. There was a snow storm and I have been watching movies”), others are undeniably poignant, such as the bleak declaration, “I knew you would do this to me.” Whether silly or sad, it is certain that, as individuals in the 21st Century, there is a break-up text we can all relate to. (via Rick Wester Fine Art)

Check out “It’s Not You” now through January 10, 2015 at New York’s Rick Wester Fine Art!

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