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The Slicing Sun Light Sculptures Of James Nizam

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Artist James Nizam calls photographs documents of ‘light sculptures’.  For the series he captures the sun and manipulates it into various ‘structures’.  Using precise cuts into the exterior of the house, small mirrors mounted on ball joints, and studying the movement of the summer sun Nazam was able to capture these images.  A synthetic fog emphasizes the concentrated beams of light, making them almost palpable like floating fluorescent light bulbs.  See photos of Nizam preparing the house after the jump.

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100 People Per Minute

 

 

Never Hide Films, in collaboration with N.A.S.A/Squeak E Clean and Rossangeles, has created a little viral video called “100 People Per Minute,” showcasing 100 people creating one beat-boxing orgy of a song in a minute.

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Daniel Kukla’s Landscapes Reflected In Mirrors

We have featured Daniel Kukla‘s Captive Landscapes project here in the past. In his newest project entitled The Edge Effect Kukla utilizes a mirrored effect to reveal new compositions within environments. Using nothing but a large mirror and a painters easel Daniel forces an Edge Effect. This term is used in the field of ecological sciences to describe the juxtaposition that results in the meeting of two distinct ecosystems. He describes the process as “Using a single visual plane, this series of images unifies the play of temporal phenomena, contrasts of color and texture, and natural interactions of the environment itself.”

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Fun With Oliver Dunn

I am really enjoying UK artist Oliver Dunn’s work!

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Astounding Close-Up Photographs Of Animal Eyeballs

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Husky Dog

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Kramer’s Parrott

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Discus Fish

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Horse

For his series Animal Eyes, the Armenian photographer Suren Manvelyan captures close-ups of animal eyeballs belonging to diverse creatures, revealing both the complexity and universality of the organ. Beneath his macro lens, these small circular organs appear paradoxically vast; at times, their curved surfaces resemble the entirety of planet Earth as seen from space, cloudy with ribbons of pigmentation. Here, the eyes, considered to be windows to the soul, reflect back a cosmic realm that evokes the metaphysical, but at the same time, they are startlingly material. The pupil, a seeming abyss ascending into the unknown, is cushioned by substantial tissues that ground us firmly within the corporeal world.

Though the species shot here vary immensely, a comforting uniformity emerges from the images; through the changes in iris hue and pupil dilation, there is a shared urgency in each gaze, a sweeping desire simply to see. The horse, his eyes veiled in straw-like lashes, fixes the lens with the same intensity as the hippo, whose wrinkled, fleshy eyelids peel back. Where most photography relies upon the assumption that we may watch without fear of being observed ourselves, Manvelyan’s images inspire within us a sense of being seen; are these opened eyes, these celestial orbs, looking back at us? What do they see? Check out the artist’s photographs of the human eye here. (via Agonistica)

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The Tiny or Giant Sculptures of Petros Chrisostomou

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It’s difficult to gauge scale in the work of Petros Chrisostomou.  The giant shoes seem so detailed; the galleries look immaculate.  If you want to know I’ll spoil it for you…it’s the galleries that are tiny.  Chrisostomou uses small mundane objects as the center of his photographs.  He places these in the middle of amazingly detailed miniature galleries.  Chrisostomou painstakingly gives attention to lighting, scale, perspective, and detail.  The realism of his sets force the eye and mind to alternate between small and large scales, doubting each in the process.

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Natalie Frank’s Deconstructed Faces

Natalie Frank‘s paintings are worlds in which both form and formality have been melted away. Faces have been disintegrated into their constituent parts, held together by goopy swathes of color; subjects are diving into free love, violent and vulnerable states. One thing you might notice when looking at her work is that however distended every other part of a body may be, at least one eye is always in sharp focus. This may or may not have to do with the fact that until this last summer, Natalie could only receive optical sensation from her left eye, causing her to see a two dimensional world. How you theorize about that information in relation her work is up to you, but if you want to do it in person, she has a show up at Fredericks & Freiser until November 3. Check it out!

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The Tiniest Landscapes Painted On Miniature Pieces Of Food

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For the Turkish artist Hasan Kale, the tiniest morsel of food inspires visions of sweeping landscapes. Using his finger as a palate, he adorns almonds, M&Ms, and the most translucent layers of an onion with astonishing renderings of his native Istanbul. Where most landscapes take up entire museum walls, commanding attention with their sheer immensity, Kale’s work does the opposite. In these miraculous works of macro painting, the infinite nature of the earth, sea, and sky collides with the impossibly minuscule, heightening the preciousness of the Turkish terrain.

Here, snack foods become as wondrous as great feats of nature and man. On thin slice of banana, a storm rages, its brushstrokes transforming the very texture of the fruit into that of a saturated canvas. On the inner flesh of an almond, he imagines the legendary baroque architecture of the Nusretiye Mosque. The iconic building becomes vertically stretched as in a romantic masterpiece, extending upwards to conform to the natural shape of the almond. On these tiny surfaces, the grandiosity of the city’s architecture is expressed through the vibrancy of color and the dreamy, sweeping whims of the artist’s brush.

Perhaps the most poignant aspect of Kale’s work is its impermanence. Unlike the great canvases entombed in museums, these paintings will decay, perish, or be lost. The banana will rot into mush; the fragile quail egg might crumble. A stunning mosque might accidentally be eaten. But in the meantime, these imagined landmarks exist for the sake of our wonderment. Take a look. (via Colossal)

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