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Dan Gluibizzi’s Voyeuristic Watercolors

Dan Gluibizzi’s work combines voyeurism with soft wash watercolor, creating pieces that feel like you’re looking in on strangers lives from a distance. He uses images from the internet, sometimes amateur porn photos but recreates his pieces in a completely refreshing manner. Viewing his work is nothing like viewing the photos they came from, he adds a sense of curiosity and innocence in his figures that comes through beautifully in his medium.

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Jillian Dickson’s Meticulous Drawings Fuse Human Organs With Nature

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A beautiful drawing lures you in. It enamors and feeds an aesthetic which is similar to falling in love. The senses are heightened and you feel good. It allows you to breath and stop for a moment and reflect. It acts as an aphrodisiac brought on not only by creator but viewer who enables it to live.

Jillian Dickson creates drawings filled with love. After giving birth to her son she reflected on the powerful connection between us and nature. This spawned a series which entwined placentas and umbilical chords with delicate budding flowers, insects and plants. Like the connection between mother and child the parts symbolize our union to every living thing in the world. In a weird way, the drawings recall The Matrix. There’s something deeper to be found behind expertly rendered flowers and parts which cannot be seen but felt.

The floral arrangements in Dickson’s drawings bloom off the page in round shapes resembling mandalas. The ultra detailing giving them not an artificial but almost surreal touch. Done in colored pencil, the fine point and light stroke needed to produce these intriguing pieces of paper preoccupies most of Dickson’s studio practice. They are labor intensive and done with much thought and care. Some past projects have involved two elephants, tumors and plants, hanging bodies and pastel babies. She has exhibited all over the world including The Louvre in Paris for Drawing Now and Manifest Drawing Gallery in Cincinnati, Ohio. She currently lives in Chapel Hill, North Carolina and works part time at Elon University.

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Alison Pebworth Beautiful Possibility

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In 2006, “Looking for Lost History” traveled in the form of a 19th Century American Traveling Show. This was Alison Pebworth’s first tour in a continued series of traveling exhibitions, exchanges and happenings exploring what it means to be American. The investigation continues with “Beautiful Possibility” launched first in San Francisco at Southern Exposure coinciding with a intimate exhibition of drawings and a video by Chris Sollars at Michael Rosenthal. The project will then travel May through October from California to South Dakota across the northern United States and Canada. Pebworth seeks to discover a new understanding of our past, present and future through research, conversation and survey’s comparing and contrasting opinions of those living and working in the various regions she visits along the tour.

Pebworth writes: “This interactive project combines art, history and anthropology for an investigative look at obscured people, places, stories and myths and how they contribute to our collective understanding of who we are as Americans. Venues for the traveling show are pre-scheduled and will serve as headquarters for conducting research on local histories and culture. I will be physically touring the show and living in a travel trailer for this solo journey, interacting directly with regional audiences and gathering source material for new work to be included in the second tour and culminating exhibitions in 2011 and 2012.”

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Ben Beshaw’s Outer space Kitten Riders

Ben Beshaw’s paintings of galactic cat riding avengers and unicorn saving business men will surely appeal both to lovers of uncanny narratives and surreal juxtapositions.

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Made With Color Presents: Colette Robbins’ Landscape Paintings Made With Graphite And Dremel Sanders

Colette Robbins

Colette Robbins

Colette Robbins

Beautiful/Decay has partnered with premiere website building platform Made With Color  to bring you some of the most exciting contemporary artists working today. Made With Color allows you to create a website that is professional and accessible with just a few clicks and no coding. This week we bring you the desolate and eerie landscapes of Colette Robbins .

New York based artist Colette Robbins’ intricate works on paper lie somewhere between the medium of drawing and painting. Colette painstakingly creates each drawing by dissolving graphite powder with water to create thousands of transparent layers of graphite in a technique borrowed from old master glaze painting. She then takes various erasers and even a Dremel sanding tool to the surface to add highlights and other details. The result is a wondrous world of imaginary landscapes with monolithic heads that may remind you of Easter Island or some other ancient ruin filled with mystique and awe.

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Prettywhores’ Monster Mashups

Tulsi Maya, a 22-year-old illustrator/ collage artist and self-proclaimed “jobless wonder” who goes by the moniker Prettywhores, describes her work as “an infinite motif of naked beings, patterns and the primitive fauna / flora of this world complimented by a riot of satanic beasts, creeps and mutant night walkers vomiting up nostalgia.” Check out more of her perfectly irreverent and deliciously grotesque monster mashups on her tumblr, The Darling and the Dirty

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William S. Stone’s Chair Sculptures

William S. Stone’s work blurs the lines between design and art with his reimagined chairs and other domestic furniture.

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Studio Visit: Claude Collins-Stracensky’s Explorations in Space and Light

As part of our ongoing partnership with In The Make, Beautiful/Decay is sharing a studio visit with artist Claude Collins-Stracensky. See the full studio visit and interview with Claude and other West Coast artists at www.inthemake.com.

Claude’s studio is in a commercial building in Downtown, Los Angeles right where two fairly busy streets intersect. It’s a few floors up, and as soon as Klea and I stepped out from the elevator doors Claude’s Vizsla dogs greeted us with wild tail-wagging enthusiasm and then lead the way into the studio. It’s a huge corner space with tons of natural light streaming in through the wide windows that lends an almost limitless feel to the room. I took a few minutes to wander around and take it all in— the dogs tumbling about together in play, the dust particles fluttering in and out of the hazy afternoon light, and the many projects underway, all of them in various states of completeness. At any given time Claude is often at work on multiple endeavors, taking time with each to experiment, re-think, tinker and tweak. His studio is a like a research lab where he plays around with concepts and materials, creating mock-ups and models, and then tries to bring these ideas to life with his hands. There is a bit of a “mad scientist” in Claude— he approaches his work with unfettered imagination and whimsy, totally unafraid to scheme and dream big, and he seems almost possessed by a rampant curiosity about the natural world and how it works. At the core of Claude’s practice is a preoccupation with physical systems and processes and the innate dynamics of different materials, and the ways in which these forces and elements can interact to bring about a new consciousness of one’s surroundings. Embracing a range of mediums, his practice often plays with perception and aims to expand his viewers’ visual experience and spatial awareness to create impressions that go beyond an everyday understanding of the world. I got the impression that the wheels in Claude’s brain must always be spinning at top speed, never at rest, always at work on questions, always in a state of assessing and hypothesizing. Which is kind of funny, because he comes across as super mellow… but I didn’t let that easy-going vibe fool me!

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