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Michael West’s Bicycle Made Out Of Wood, Willow And Stinging Nettle

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A bicycle made out willow, ash and stinging nettle found in it’s organic and primal form in nature, near the artist’s home in Somerset, England. Michael West has built an intricate sculpture as a self portrait. Imitating each and every components of a real bike from the handlebars to the tires. His process of creation excludes all boundaries, he lets the imagination interpret the symbols he left out on the bike to understand the meaning of his art.

He was influenced by Van Gogh’s chair, where the empty chair is used as the personification of its owner. “I chose the bike as society often uses anthropomorphism to reflect themselves within everyday objects, for example a car may be male or female and often given a personality and sometimes even a name”.

Michael West believes in playing with the subconscious to create. Blending an adult and a child’s vision, he gathers many layers, clue information such as symbols, signs and colors to clarify his intentions and his claims towards society and politics.This process creates a dynamic relationship between the artist and his object. The details characterized by a slow construction, attention to detail and means chosen carefully mirror the artist’s personality. This assembled bike, at first and abstract piece; becomes the reality of Michael West and soon an extension of himself.(Via Junkculture)

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Literally Balling: Victor Solomon Transforms Basketball Backboards Into Delicate Stained Glass

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Some may say basketball is their religion. Well, if you worship the game, then these stained glass basketball backboards might be right up your alley. Like stained glass windows that depict religious icons in churches and cathedrals, artist Victor Solomon places breathtaking and beautiful stained glass windows in place of basketball backboards. These are not likely to be used at any court that you’ve ever seen, as they are likely to shatter into a thousand pieces. Each piece is ornamented in luxurious materials and gems, including the basketball goal’s net and rim. This series, cleverly titled Literally Balling, embodies the lavish lifestyle and luxury that NBA all-stars. These superstars being like royalty, Victor Solomon adds an age old, delicate art to their domain.

Solomon hand assembles these brilliant and intricate creations in the timeless beauty of the Tiffany Style. What is ironic about this work is that although hypnotizing to look at, none of the remarkable basketball goals are by any means functional. They are as fragile and as easily broken as success and wealth. If a basketball player gets injured, they can be done with playing the game forever. Their career could be over. Solomon’s goals embody this brilliance, power, and delicateness that a life in the sports industry can have. If you want to see more of Victor Solomon’s amazing work, you can see more of his work here.

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Francisco de Pájaro Creates Endearingly Twisted Monsters Out Of Curbside Trash

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In cities around the world, trash has started to take on a new face—literally. In the middle of the night, street artist Francisco de Pájaro has been adorning garbage with fiendish faces and gangly limbs. His collage materials include stuffed plastic bags, abandoned mattresses, and soiled cardboard—anything that has been left on the curb to rot. The result is a cast of absurd, endearingly twisted (and occasionally perverted) monsters that populate the streets in various states of exuberant disarray until they are swept off by a garbage truck.

Accompanying each site-specific creation is de Pájaro’s signature statement: “Art is Trash,” referring to his subversively creative celebration of human debris. Garbage—the output of our material, earthly lives—is usually a miserable sight, symptomatic of our obsessive consumption and the processes of decay. By bringing humor to such unpleasant sights, de Pájaro allows pedestrians in London, Barcelona, New York and more to engage with trash in a more thought-provoking way—one that playfully criticizes consumerism and examines our fear of death and abjection. As the artist’s about page describes,

“Art Is Trash is the hypnotic hand that resuscitates the cadavers of hyper consumerism—the trash—back to fruition in our current, material, state of consciousness. The process behind every installation is a ritual, similar to a shamanic one. A ritual of connection with Mother Nature, where [the] life of matter is a cycle that never ends. Francisco’s work reflects the analogy that exists between the life cycle of the objects and that of physical bodies. Both never cease to exist. They continue to live in parallel realities. The cadavers of consumerism live a new life in the urban, artistic realm.” (Source)

“Art is Trash” is currently on tour in New York. Check out the artist’s website to see which streets his moldering-yet-merry creations will be inhabiting next. De Pájaro also recently published a book documenting this project. (Via Design Faves)

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Drew Mosley Three-Dimensional Forest Critters Come Alive In Layers Of Resin

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Drew Mosley - Mixed Media

Canadian artist Drew Mosley paints vivid scenes of anthropomorphic animals on layers and layers of resin. Being an artist and a carpenter, his work contains layers of resin that sit inside custom made wooden frames. Being surrounded by incredible nature in his hometown of Ontario, he draws inspiration from the breathtaking beauty of the wild. The little forest creatures he depicts in his artwork are no doubt animals that he has come across on hikes or in daily life. Drew Mosley’s furry friends look like characters from a storybook, with lots of personality and quirky qualities. Although the critters are wild, they act somewhat like humans by carrying objects such as traveling packs and flags.

Drew Mosley creates in depth atmospheres by painting on individual layers of resin. Each animal almost seems to be popping out of its lush habitat, appearing three-dimensional. Even the feathers of the owl seem to be standing straight up, creating a very real sense of volume and shape. By using this technique, the artist renders extremely realistic textures of fur, feathers, twigs, and leaves. Many of his dioramas include found objects that sit right in the resin, jutting out from the piece. In Mosley’s work titled The Egg Thief, a real quail egg is included in the composition, making the entire piece look all the more realistic. The artist also being a carpenter, he creates sculptures and installations of his wild critters. (via Colossal)

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Emilio Gomariz Choreographs His Mac Folders To Create Colorful Gradients Visuals

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Emilio Gomariz is opening his world of digital rainbows moving in circles, up and down and side to side on the screen of his Macintosh desktop. An animated choreography of colored gradients pops out on the interface. It is the result of a scrupulous folder sorting and positioning on the screen. Each animation is captured and transmitted on You Tube; revealing how the tricks operate.

The Macintosh Lab Series is Comprised of four digital animations, Opening Folders, Nyan Folder, Deep Gradiant and Spinning Beach Folders. They all operate the same way. The folders are selected with cmd (A) or by dragging the cursor.
The placement of the folders is key as it will determine the order of appearance of the windows. Therefore they are located on the corners, in the middle; aligned vertically or horizontally. A simple action such as selecting and opening files becomes for Emilio Gomariz an accumulation of astonishing complex visuals.
Even in his previous work inspired by a bug from the OS X, the windows froze when opening a folder, shows that manipulating an error or a simple task can produce an eye catching concept. As the color hue of the gradient changes, the image generates kaleidoscopic frames, tunnels, and flow.

The videos are the living proof that we are totally immersed into technology. We understand the artist’s technical process, the rendering and most importantly we are doing it everyday. Conceptualism is the idea that results in art prevail over tools and components. In our digital era, we have replaced the canvas for the screen. We are now the authors of our own performances. (via Triangulation)

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Valerie Blass Reimagines The Human Figure By Abstracting Its Structure and Space

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Artist Valerie Blass reimagines an age-old subject in art, the figure, and uses her distinctive artistic vision to create her intriguing sculptures. She manipulates and abstracts the human form until some of her subjects look like entirely different beings. By constructing her artwork from an eclectic variety of different materials, each figure becomes highly stylized and unique. Ceramic, Styrofoam, paint, plaster, and even artificial hair are just some of the materials that can be found making up Blass’s artwork. Referencing material culture, one can see the many textures and elements transforming each figure.

Valerie Blass’s figures hold in intense, psychological quality due to their lack of identities. Although there are many fine details in her work, Blass often leaves out the figures’ face. Sometimes, even part of the body is gone. These aspects are replaced by surreal characteristics such as a heap of black hair or a colorful, organic mass. Each piece of Valerie Blass’s takes on a life of their own, with their own, unique textures and colors forming a new kind of creature. Her work is both bizarre and beautiful all at the same time, leaving you puzzled about what exactly it was that you saw. This Canadian artist has an impressive body of work, with her art being owned in both public and private collections around the world.

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Tomás Saraceno Explores Our Environmental Impact By Creating A Massive Hot Air Balloon Out Of Plastic Bags

Tomás Saraceno, Becoming Aerosolar - Installation Tomás Saraceno, Becoming Aerosolar - Installation Tomás Saraceno, Becoming Aerosolar - Installation Tomás Saraceno, Becoming Aerosolar - Installation

Tomás Saraceno is an Argentine artist who creates pieces that explore alternative, sustainable ways of viewing and interacting with the environment. Previous works include floating iridescent and geometric installations that affect the way we perceive the relationship between the earth and sky. In this project, titled “Becoming Aerosolar,” Saraceno has woven together a patchwork of plastic bags into a massive hot air balloon. Trapping the heat of the sun in a greenhouse-like effect, the plastic canvas lifts majestically into the sky, transforming stigmatized, non-biodegradable waste into a work of liberating beauty.

Exploring the creative crossover between environmentalism, history, art, and human perception, Saraceno notes how the hot air balloon “came about as a means of escape and protection in the late 18th century, during the time of the French Revolution. It is significant that during these times of uncertainty, people looked to the sky to escape the reality on earth” (Source). As an innovation deriving from crisis and a longing for freedom, the plastic bag balloon takes on a contemporary significance: in an age of environmental turmoil, when the planet we inhabit verges on irreparable damage, the sky (and beyond that, outer space) becomes the frontier of hope. However, beyond signifying that upward glance of salvation and survival, “Becoming Aerosolar” optimistically reminds us how repurposing our materials and shifting our perspectives could lead to changing our trajectory on Earth.

“Becoming Aerosolar” is currently on exhibition at the 21er Haus in Vienna through to August 30th. Visit Saraceno’s website to explore more of his works. (Via Junkculture)

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Renato Garza Cervera’s Thought Provoking Work Turns Gang Members Into Gruesome Hyper Realist Skin Rugs

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You may remember the murder of French filmmaker/ photojournalist Christian Poveda in 2009, following the release of his documentary La Vida Loca, which depicted the lives and inner workings of gangs in El Salvadore. These very same gang members are now the subject of artist Renato Garza Cervera’s latest work “Of Genuine Contemporary Beast” depicts the MS-13 and MS-18 gangs in a series of hyper realist skin rugs. In this series, he depicts gang members in such a way that we are accustomed to seeing animals such as bears and, by doing so, he plays upon the notions of beasts and fear of such beasts.

His work offers a series of harshly realistic rugs and severed heads whose accuracy makes you question their nature. The “skins” of the gang members are splayed out, wit the heads included in order to make a sort of “gang skin rug”. His depiction of members of these specific gangs comes with a deeper ethical message in the sense that it allows us to determine the parameters of our definition of “beast”, such as we do with regards to wild animals and other aspects of nature.

In this thought provoking series, Cervera is underlining what he refers to as the “ world-wide scapegoating process”, and by this he aims to point our the ways in which certain minorities and groups are viewed as “dispensable people”.He allows us to examine a societal problem and, to a larger extent the ways in which we blame and sometimes demonize the things we do not understand.

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