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Complex Lace Graffiti Adds A Touch Of Harmony And Femininity To Urban Spaces

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Artist Nespoon, based in Warsaw, knows how to make people smile and forget, just for a second their worries. Random streets, abandoned spaces and tree trunks is where the artist chooses to install her intricate lace patterns, taking street art to another level. She stencils sidewalks, sprays signposts and hangs handmade crochet with no other intention than to create a surprise for the streetwalkers.

She calls her art “public jewelry”. Her devotion to making the streets look prettier is poignant. The lace patterns she uses are traditional, bold and extremely detailed for their sizes. She is inspired by textiles and makes sure to outsource local suppliers. The geometric and airy patterns generate harmony. Just what a busy jungle city needs: peace and beauty. By adding a touch of femininity to urban spaces, the city becomes lively and vibrant.

Lace has a special meaning for Nespoon. It has a history that speaks to the majority, mostly women. As for centuries, women were the only one crocheting, leaving a heavy heritage that can be now counterbalanced to their own benefits. They can recognize in the artist’s work a familiarity, a deja-vu and embrace the installations. (via Behance).

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The Morbidly Peculiar Animal Skeletons Of Caitlin T. McCormack Are Crocheted Out Of String

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The morbid sculptures of Caitlin T. McCormack would fit right in at your next Halloween party. She creates beautifully intricate skeletons of fictional creatures – rodents, seahorses, insects and animals. Not only do they look fragile, macabre, antique, precious and ghoulish, but you would probably be surprised to learn what they are made from. The artist actually discovered that covering crocheted cotton string in PVA glue stiffens the material, producing a bone-like effect.

Her dark, heavenly creatures are usually displayed, sprawled out and pinned to a dark board of some sort. They look as if their skin and meat has been carefully dissected and discarded, leaving their skeletal remains to be gracefully displayed for all to delight in their discovery. Not only does McCormack craft these intricate alien-bone-forms, but also delicate lace work, dramatic dresses that look like they were worn to a ghost’s wedding, and charming little illustrations and plasticine characters that usually reference a well known horror story.

The busy artist doesn’t stop there – her work will be also feature as a part of the group show Opus Hypnagogia: Sacred Spaces of the Visionary and Vernacular at The Morbid Anatomy Museum in Brooklyn, New York. Exploring states we experience between waking and sleeping, the show is a journey into altered perspectives, dark thoughts and unknown visions. A combination of historical, ‘Outsider’ and Visionary art, the show promises to be enlightening and entertaining. Running from July 18th – October 15th, be sure to explore the show and bring out your own black magic.

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Stefanie Gutheil’s Paintings Are About to Lose It

The work of Stefanie Gutheil is a wonderful mess.  Her current exhibit at the Mike Weiss gallery has the atmosphere of the precise moment a party becomes a riot.  Gutheil’s paintings incorporate fleshy globs of oil and acrylic paint, fabric, glitter, hair, and fur.  The seemingly turbid materials match the paintings’ libidinous subject matter.  Even some of the paintings frames  only seem to exist in order to be defied – cat’s tails, pants, hats all push past gilded frames and off the canvas.  In what she portrays and how she portrays it, Gutheil’s work pinpoints a curious place precisely between fun and horror – the moment before the last finger loses its grip.

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Alex Kiessling’s Psychedelic Glitch Paintings Exist Between Reality And A Dream

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Multimedia artist Alex Kiessling works with different ideas of how the future can be. He combines the ideas of fine art and high technology. He has used robots as painting assistants and exhibited it through a live stream to a worldwide internet-based audience. This series of paintings give the impression that they were made with digital help. Their colorful layers are overlapped just like a screen print gone wrong, but of course this is intentional. But despite appearances, Kiessling has achieved this striking effect by painting acrylic on canvas – by hand.

The series, titled Shift, ties in with his larger ideas of augmented reality, simulation, hybrids, and the existence between reality and dream. He explains a bit more:

In the static scenes of my paintings, the protagonists remain mostly resident between the glaring colorfulness of virtual realities and darkness, which is inherent in most of our dream sequences and memories. Both of these worlds are paramount due to their systematic character, which is connected to the simulative, and are projection surfaces of the human psyche. (Source)

His paintings have the affect of dreaming – you feel like what you are seeing isn’t really right, and maybe you should look a little harder. He has a beautiful way of describing his work:

In my work I concentrate on dreams and all kinds of dreamlike structures and explore its borders and bridges to reality. I try to visualize the “no men`s land” between the absurdity in our existence and the concrete concerns that come with our human mind or spirit. I am fascinated by the interacting vibrations between virtual reality, dreams and the basic common ground of our world`s so called reality. (Source)

Kiessling is interested in fragmented identities, and the fact that most of us now-a-days live our lives out in many different spheres or realities – in the physical as well as the digital. His painting series Shift is just another visual exploration of the theme that is becoming more and more relevant to this generation. (Via SuperSonic Art)

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Interview with Videos Collide artist Jeremy Bailey

Real-time software performance "Future of Theatre"

There is never a dull moment in Jeremy Bailey’s performances – I’d like go ahead the deliveries of his stand-up/software demos/karaoke sessions as the funnier “artistic” Steve Jobs. In “The Future of Theatre” debuting tonight, he plays “this hopeless and foolish slave trying desperately to conjure his machine to do increasingly absurd tasks of questionable use. Computers are the new chauvinist modernists.”

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Liam Henry

LiamHenry3England’s Liam Henry takes wonderful film photographs.  They give a feeling of chilly, sparse, wooded exploration and wandering.

Check out more work at his site and his flickr.

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uberkraaft

British artist Matt Williams A.K.A Uberkraaft  should be renamed Uberkool! He’s got a beautiful portfolio full of ultra detailed black and white illustrations as well as perfectly colored pieces that are bold but not too pushy. More visual eye candy after the jump!

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Dido Fontana

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Dido Fontana‘s photography-vérité, is candid, relaxed, naturalistic (okay, not natural for everyone) and funny.  Using film and developer, acid and dark rooms he discovers his girls and their midnight romps are beautiful, it just might be their off day and that’s okay.

Read more about Dido in this interview & check out some preview images from his newly release book.

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