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The Singh Twins

My favorite painters, the Singh Twins, talk about their commissioned works for Liverpool European Capital of Culture 08. The Singh twins recontextualize a traditional style of Indian Miniature painting with pop culture references to create something lovely and new.

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Jon Rafman

The embedded video above comes from the latest project by Montreal-based media artist Jon Rafman. Kool-Aid Man in Second Life offers to give Internet users free guided tours of Second Life by Rafman’s avatar, the Kool-Aid Man. The aforementioned video is a promotional video showing scenes of the tour (by the way, apparently some of this may not be NSFW, though I watched the first minute or two and didn’t really notice anything bad). The subtlety of the video, and the entire project, is what makes it so engaging. There are all sorts of questions raised here: about the role of crafted pop culture icons in the new era of user generated content, about the nature of scenic beauty, about our interaction with kitsch. Someone take the tour and let us know how it is!

PS: Check out this essay Rafman wrote on Google Street View. Very compelling stuff.

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Dustin Yellin Densley Collaged Lifesize Figures Are Beautifully Suspended Between Layers Of Glass

Dustin Yellin - Sculpture 3

Dustin Yellin - Sculpture 6 Dustin Yellin - Sculpture 7 Dustin Yellin - Sculpture 8

Glass boxes reveal human silhouettes made out of drawings, newspapers and discarded cutouts of images. Dustin Yellin, an artist based in New York, piles up layers of glass sheets and ripped up medias. It took up to 6 years for the artist to complete this work initially produced for New York City Ballet’s annual Art Series. He was influenced by the movement and the discipline of the dancers.

The artist’s work consists on drawing on slides of glass. He collects newspapers, magazines and cuts out heads and shapes he finds interesting to apply to the character he is working on. He only depicts humans. By stacking up the collages, drawings and the slides of glasses he creates a “window sandwich”. The 3D silhouette designed in the end is poetic, colorful and up close extremely creative. He calls the series of his 12 characters, “Psychogeographies”, or archive in the shape of humans.

His purpose is to redefine the insides of individuals. In order to bring humans together and to evolve together towards a brighter future, we need to make one.
He claims that countries, borders and religions are not relevant when it comes to human kind. Instead of being divided by external elements, Dustin Yellin believes in exchanging as much as we can before the world of differences we produce and live in collapses. (via High Fructose). 

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Cornelia Konrads’ Anti Gravity Installations

Cornelia Konrads’ outdoor installations would appear normal on the moon where gravity is not a concern but on Earth they trick the eye and make viewers take a second look. Installing site specific works internationally, Konrads’ works appear to be in a constant flux, moving up, down, side to side and everywhere in between as if they areconstructing and deconstructing themselves over and over again. (via colossal)

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Facundo Arganaraz’s Reinvigorated Images

Facundo Arganaraz lives and work in San Francisco. Using entirely found imagery and a crisp design sensibility Arganaraz alters and skews in order to create a modern dialogue with vintage visuals. His subject matter and acrylic with screen print technique is reminiscent of Christopher Wool and Andy Warhol as he too utilizes a design based aesthetic in which he incorporates text, multiples of the same imagery, and washed out color fields. In his own words: “Living among the vestiges of cultural entropy, I am using anachronistic elements and discarded images not for their nostalgic value but as remains (debris, waste, etc.) of 20th century utopias on the making. Mostly comprised of found photographs, photocopies, and pages from vintage books depicting modern designs and/or environments, I recruit this imagery (retro esthetics) as a mark-making tool, already packed and charged (ready-made?) with pictorial formal elements. Their core forms serve only to organize visual fields into dynamic, constructed compositions that hold a structural relation to the surface they organize.”

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Pia Bramley’s Ink Wash Drawings

Pia Bramley uses ink wash to make impressionist drawings that are marvelous embodiments of the word Dreamy. But unlike surrealist artists, who consciously try to render a dreamscape and thereby make us think more about the idea of said painting being an interesting dream, Pia’s just make you feel like you’re dreaming when you look at her work. Which we could probably all agree is a real treat. If they look familiar, you might have seen them in the New York Times or on plates from Anthropologie.

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PornoGraphics

PornoGraphics is a design studio out of Barcelona, Spain. They recently shot us an email and I noticed the name seemed familiar, so I went back through my brain vault and remembered seeing this video a few weeks ago. The titles and graphics they created are awesome and their other work is great too. Well done.

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Ulrich Collette’s Spliced Portraits Shows Incredible Genetic Similarities In Relatives

Ulrich Collette

Father / Son: Denis, 60 & Mathieu, 25 years

Ulrich Collette

Grandmother / Granddaughter: Ginette, 62, & Ismaëlle,12

Ulrich Collette

Daughter / Mother: Marie-Pier 18 & N’sira, 49

Ulrich Collette

Father / Son: Denis, 53 & William, 28 years

Photography has long been used to document the scientific process and display visual evidence, so when Ulric Collette began to use the medium to show how genetics can exhibit itself, it was both the obvious similarities, and differences, that caught everyone’s attention. Working out of Quebec, Canada, Ulric, a self-taught photographer and graphic designer, began the photoseries in 2008 where family member’s faces were spliced together to create portraits that compared physical appearance with contrasting ages. The process seems like a no-brainer, but it was truly born from an accident. The photographer explains, “I was attempting to create something totally different with another project, and in the process I came up with the first picture, me and my then 7-year-old son,”. Realizing the easily viewed comparison between generations when shown spliced together, Ulric began to enlist the help of others to show the effects of genetics. He continues, “I decided to try the same process with a few family members and the project was born.”

Collette uses specific portraits edited down from hundreds of tightly-controlled photos, to create his finished works. Acknowledging that even with the advances of editing software, it is still very difficult to find an appropriate match that works, he explains the difficulty of the project, “I need to take a lot of pictures in a controlled environment of each model, compare the picture to one another, chose the right ones and stick them together in Photoshop” .

The photographer used many of his own family members to investigate these connections, including his daughter and mother (above, Ginette & Ismaëlle), and even himself and his own brother (below, Christopher & Ulric). Collette explains, “The reaction to the project never ceases to surprise me…A few of the ones I’m in shocked me – me and my brother Christopher, for example, we totally look the same!” (via huffington post and bbc)

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