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Shirt Of The Month!

 

Each month, Beautiful/Decay will release a new shirt on the Beautiful/Decay shop before they hit any retail stores. The shirts will be printed in unique color ways in a select print run of just 300 shirts. Oh, and did we mention that we’ll be giving you a 33% discount off retail prices, pricing them at just $20 a shirt?

 

Here’s a rundown of the B/D monthly shirt release:

 

– Available in advance before the season ships to retailers
– Unique color way printed in a select run of 300 shirts
– 33% discount off retail price, at just $20 a shirt

 

First Release “Lost Face” by Vladimir (Waldez) Snegotskiy aka Ctrl-V


Vladimir Sengotskiy creates his hypercolor fantasmagoric creations in multi-media, ranging from print, web, motion and beyond. His recent design for Beautiful/Decay apparel is a neo-neon medusa’s head mask, seething with bright purple, yellow, blue and brown snakes and line confetti. Carnival masques meets facepaint!

 

CLICK HERE TO PURCHASE LOST FACE!

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Brendan Flanagan

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Observing Brendan Flanagan’s paintings is like walking through a dark dream of regrets, fears, and loneliness. Vague, human-like figures in physical, emotional, or silent turmoil completely transient within their own surreal environment.

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Sarah Sze Forages And Deposits A New Installation At Venice Biennale

Sarah Sze - Installation Sarah Sze - Installation Sarah Sze - Installation

Sarah Sze’s installations incorporate everyday items from toothpicks to light bulbs, and “Triple Point,” her most recent endeavor at the Venice Biennale, is no different. Ladders, paper scraps, aluminum rods, sleeping bags, and other finely scavenged items collect and assemble to create a whole new type of machinery: a thinking one that has to do with re-assessing value and investigating the romanticism of objects at play with one another in this never-ending Milky Way of constructs.

According to The New York Times, Sze “wanted the installation to bleed out into the environment.’’ This is relevant to not only the pavilion itself, where the bulk of her work sprawls from room to room and outward onto the exterior landscaping, but also the neighboring community.

Blazing a cryptic trail, before the opening, Sze deposited a series of fake rocks (aluminum structures wrapped in photographs of rocks) sporadically in unexpected places, sometimes, with local businesses, who now house them in unconventional spaces, often along with their own imaginative origin stories. The intention is to lead patrons into the exhibit slowly, almost subconsciously, as though foraging their own trail into the surprising wilderness of Sze’s art.

More images of the installation and a video after the jump.

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Rocky Davies’ Florescent Mash-ups Feature 1980’s Villains On Fictional Album Covers

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For fans of pop-culture mash-ups, Rocky Davies has an amusing  throwback for you. The artist takes iconic villains of the 1980’s and fuses them with the music of the same era. Its outcome is a bizarre series of fictional album covers. Using fonts and colors that are reminiscent of the time, Davies creates slick designs that channel a darker version of Lisa Frank art.

The stark black backgrounds give way to fluorescent accents, and nearly all of his designs feature his subjects wearing Wayfarer sunglasses. Looking impossibly cool, these characters intermingle with bold, geometric patterns and a lot of lens flare. Lyrics from songs like the Eurythmics’ Sweet Dreams (Are Made Of This)are designed around the floating head portraits and take on a new meaning.

Davies’ series comes at the right time. It’s no doubt nostalgic, and it speaks to those who were coming of age in the 80’s. There’s enough time between their popularity and present day for people to realize how borderline cheesy these things were. These fake album covers are both an homage and poke fun at an era of visual excess. (Via Brother Tedd)

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Morgan Blair

sadpyramid Morgan Blair is an artist based out of Brooklyn, NY. Her paintings are a psychedelic mind trip with attitude. It’s an adventure just visiting her site. If you can get past the first page, it’s definitely worth checking out her other work!

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Karen Knorr’s Photographs of Sacred Indian Interiors Consider Caste, Femininity, And it’s Relationship To The Animal World

Karen knorr india song

Karen knorr india song

Karen knorr india song

Karen Knorr’s past work from the 1980’s onwards took as its theme the ideas of power that underlie cultural heritage, playfully challenging the underlying assumptions of fine art collections in academies and museums in Europe through photography and video. Since 2008 her work has taken a new turn and focused its gaze on the upper caste culture of the Rajput in India and its relationship to the “other” through the use of photography, video and performance. The photographic series considers men’s space (mardana) and women’s space (zanana) in Mughal and Rajput palace architecture, havelis and mausoleums through large format digital photography.

Karen Knorr celebrates the rich visual culture, the foundation myths and stories of northern India, focusing on Rajasthan and using sacred and secular sites to consider caste, femininity and its relationship to the animal world. Interiors are painstakingly photographed with a large format Sinar P3 analogue camera and scanned to very high resolution. Live animals are inserted into the architectural sites, fusing high resolution digital with analogue photography. Animals photographed in sanctuaries, zoos and cities inhabit palaces, mausoleums , temples and holy sites, interrogating Indian cultural heritage and rigid hierarchies. Cranes, zebus, langurs, tigers and elephants mutate from princely pets to avatars of past feminine historic characters, blurring boundaries between reality and illusion and reinventing the Panchatantra for the 21st century. (via)

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Henriëtte van ’t Hoog’s Geometric Trompe L’oeil Installations

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Henriëtte van’t Hoog’ -  Trompe L’oeil Installation

Henriëtte van’t Hoog’ -  Trompe L’oeil Installation

Henriëtte van’t Hoog’ - Installation

Dutch artist Henriëtte van ’t Hoog’s installations look 3D, but are completely flat. She uses trompe l’oeil to give her work depth, designing space in a way so that our eye is fooled. To do so, she uses geometry and specifically placed and angled shapes, sometimes building out of the wall to create more complex structures. In an interview with Visual Discrepancies, van ’t Hoog describes why she makes her work. Not surprisingly, her explanation is light-hearted. She states:

…I have been poking around for a while hoping to make people aware of color and shape, and of non-existing space. In Joint I [above] transformed a little area into something new and unexpected, joking around with color and shape while not knowing where it would lead – just having fun, and working through ways that would perhaps mislead the audience.

van ’t Hoog’s color palette is light and very colorful, at times sickeningly so. She regularly uses day glo yellow and hot pinks, which vibrate against one another in industrial spaces and white walls of a gallery. Her installations are based on believability, meaning they must be precise; She paints crisp lines and plans the angles of extra walls and surfaces so that her work appears 3D at all viewpoints. Even though there is a lot of planning involved, van ’t Hoog wants to make it look effortless. It’s important to her that the viewer see something unexpected. Later with Visual Discrepancies, she says:

…I hope when people step inside this small space and see the play with the flat and the three-dimensional, the play with the perspective and the triangular objects and how a painted piece of paper is disturbing their expectation, together with the strength of the color, that their experience will hit the roof.

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How To Get Yourself Off The Canvas And Earn Some Money

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Warhol Dollar” (CC BY 2.0) by Incase.

“Art for art’s sake, money for God’s sake. Gimme the readys. Gimme the cash”, the band 10cc sang in the ‘70s. Kevin Godley, the band’s drummer, and Lol Creme, both former arts school students, were the creative force behind the Stockport-based art rock quartet.

Essentially, the message behind the line ‘Art’s for art’s sake’ is that producing a work of art should not need any justification – monetary or otherwise. But with Arts degrees costing three times as much as science-based subjects like Biology, according to research by Voucherbox, and student debt higher than it has ever been – the highest in the English-speaking world, claims an online BBC report – sometimes it can be hard to stick to those principles. Godley spent eight years, not the usual three, studying to be a graphic designer. Just imagine the debt he would have been in had he graduated in 2016.

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