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Julian Melchiorri’s Incredible Light Sculpture Made From Silk Worm Proteins

Julian Melchiorri Julian MelchiorriJulian MelchiorriJulian Melchiorri

London based design engineer Julian Melchiorri has been inventing amazing things in the laboratory for a while now. The outcomes he produces are a beautiful mix between art and science, and are meant to solve urban problems in an environmentally focused way. His latest project Cocoon is a light sculpture consisting of a 3D printed shell, and proteins from worm silk, crafted into nanoprisms, which form the body of the sculpture. Illuminated from within by a single 1 Watt LED light, Cocoon is a wonderful example of refraction and reflections, and the understated beauty of light.

Melchiorri explains the science behind how we normally view light and how the silk worm protein breaks up rays differently.

Light is an electromagnetic radiation having a wavelength in a range of 400 nanometers. Each section of this wavelength is perceived by us in colors from blue to green and red. When we look at a light emission we usually perceive a white source due to the smallness of its wavelength that unify all the colors. When a ray of light passing through the material gets diffracted by the nano-prisms, the light wavelength is sparse until its real composition is revealed. (Source)

Cocoon is a visual experiment combining different materials, technologies and shapes. It is an innovative way of challenging our perceptions and understanding of seemingly simple things around us, in this case, light. Melchiorri and his experiments are a perfect example of the parallels between art and science. The two different areas have the same curiosity, usually about the same phenomena, and are geared toward some type of improvement. You can see Melchiorri’s other visionary projects (Silk Leaf, and Exhale) here and a video of Cocoon after the jump. (Via My Amp Goes To 11)

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Photographer Dan Busta Gets Dotty On Naked Women

Dan Busta- Photograph

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Los Angeles photographer Dan Busta has a couple very interesting photographic series exploring single-themed concepts at length. This one, Dots, is fairly self explanatory: naked women covered in dots, posing within rooms also covered in dots. What the images offer is part optical illusion and part good old fashioned sensuality. The natural beauty of the models stripped down to the most basic elements of form and pose. Through his exploration of this distinct concept, and through the manipulation of dot and background colors, Busta harnesses a unique way to showcase the beauty of these women in a flattering way.

Busta is no stranger to photographing people. He has photographed the rich and famous, his website is a yearbook of actors and celebrities we know and love. Another interesting project of his, Ghosts, shows a white-clothed figure standing in various settings. Busta’s exploration of themed projects continues to be a strong point in his work, and something that sets him apart as a photographer. It’s exciting to think of what he will do next!

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Jens Hesse’s Paintings on Corduroy Imitate Digital Distortions

German painter Jens Hesse’s work  is influenced by digital glitches and distortions. Cleverly using corduroy fabric as a base, Hesse creates fragmented images that are abstract and representational at once showing a glimpse of reality and creating unexpected abstract moments via imperfections in technology.

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Low Viscosity: Todd Davis’s Exquisite Photographs Of Neon Colored Smoke

Todd DavisTodd Davis  Todd Davis Todd Davis

Photographer Todd Davis doesn’t just take snapshots of gas and fluids, he creates beautiful, ever-interesting abstract images that are impressive and captivating. In his Viscosity Series, he presents different forms of smoke in hundreds of variations – as a colored lump, twisting and turning in on itself, or as a light and airy wisp, silently falling down and fading into the background. Reminiscent of lava lamps, or science experiments when you test different chemicals out against one another, Davis’ work is a gorgeous juxtaposition between weightlessness and form. The smoke exists on the boundary of disappearing or falling apart. Here’s an excerpt from his representative gallery:

The Viscosity Series is a photographic study of the fleeting, random shapes created when two or more dissimilar fluids are introduced. The series is called Viscosity because fluids of different densities permit a moment of suspension before they disseminate in the other giving one the appearance of being more viscous. (Source)

In true abstract fashion, his photos take on many different ideas and images. They can look like paint thrown at a wall and left to coagulate into gooey lumps, or some strange marshmallow cake that’s spilled over the edges of it’s dish, or like a blob of inks and dyes dumped into a glass of water.

Davis not only is able to flatter inanimate subjects (including beverages and tabletop set ups), he also takes beautiful portraiture photography, showing off his skill with intricate lighting configurations. 

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Exit Through The Gift Shop

Last night I was invited to attend a preview of Exit Through The Gift Shop, the much hyped documentary by the street artist Banksy. By now, you all know that I’m an avid documentary junkie. I’ll watch a documentary about paint drying on a wall if it’s well made. I’ll admit, I went into the screening room expecting to hate it- so was Banksy able to win me over?

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The Ecstasy Of Death: Paul Fryer’s Eerie And Darkly Passionate Sculptural Installations

Paul Fryer - Sculpture Paul Fryer - Sculpture Paul Fryer - Sculpture Paul Fryer - Sculpture

Paul Fryer is an artist based in London, England. We featured his works in 2011, but his stunning sculptural installations—which explore agony and human folly in passionate tandem—warrant a second examination. His works unsettle the cultural imagination by coupling mortality with religious imagery, depicting human figures on the verge of destruction and death.

One notable work is a sculpture of winged Lucifer, thrashing amidst a net of telegraph cords that suspend him above the altar steps of the Holy Trinity Church, Marylebone. This piece was part of a solo exhibition called Let There Be More Light, shown in October of 2008. The dramatic lighting casts Lucifer in dramatic shadows, and his tarnished, corpse-like skin gleams with antiquity and the torture of life-within-death. This work signifies the fallible human, and the chaos and terror of one’s own making. The venue—with its stained glass windows and domed ceiling—provides the perfect space for this dramatic, allegorical scene to unfold.

Also shown here is Fryer’s “Blue Pieta” (2010), the martyr in the electric chair, and Lilith (2010), a fallen angel bound to a platform by golden wires. In more recent years, Fryer has created jellyfish-like sculptures out of Murano crystal. You can view more of his strange and dark world on his website. (Via Empty Kingdom)

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Isabelle Wenzel’s Manipulations Of The Human Body

Dutch photographer Isabelle Wenzel’s playful photographs bend, twist and manipulate the human form into new and unknown positions. Whether it’s tackling the idea of the artist as artifact or manipulating the minimal and mundane motions of office workers Wenzel pushes the envelope of how we see the human form and how simple juxtapositions and movements can completely transform the most familiar image into the unknown.  (via)

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Sharjah Biennial : Day 2

I finally arrived in Sharjah after a grueling 20 hour flight. After dropping my bags at the hotel I headed straight towards the hotel.  Sharjah & Dubai are filled with intriguing visual stimuli. Some of the most interesting images in Dubai are the posters, photos, and paintings of the various Sheikhs. My favorite of these signs is the massive ligh tbox depicting Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan on the famous Sheik Zayed Road.

 

 

 I’ve been to Dubai and Sharjah several times and have always loved these sun visors on the backs of cars. You’ll see them all over the place depicting the royal family behind a flapping U.A.E flag. I’m sure that we’ll be seeing images of Obama on the backs of car windows in no time.

 

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