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Benjamin Edmiston’s Constructed Chaos

 

We have featured the work of Brooklyn based Benjamin Edmiston in the past (here). His recent pieces project a heightened confidence in collage making. His work looks as if he utilizes absolutely everything he can find. Scraps and swatches of paper litter his wacky folk art worlds. The viewer is presented with a scene of meticulously constructed chaos. In dissecting the layers one finds zany circumstances presented with precision.    

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Aaron Vinton

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Illustrative print work by current (or past?) Cal Arts design student Aaron Vinton. I really like his style and color use! Special reflection!

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Pinched, Pulled And Crumpled Wood Sculptures From Cha Jong-Rye

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The work of Korean artist Cha Jong-Rye looks like anything but wood.  Her large pieces hang on the wall as if they were draped cloth, strange liquids, and geological formations.  Her peculiar choice of medium undoubtedly references these and other ideas of nature and the home.  She painstakingly carves her work from wood, often from hundreds of small pieces.  She seems to crumple, pinch, and pull a material that’s especially rigid, typically found as a tree or house.  They’re temptingly tactile – if no one in the gallery noticed I’d nearly be enticed to drag my fingers across their surface. [via]

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Steve Gorman Reanimates

Steve Gorman’s ceramic works explore his obsession with nature,  animal and human forms, and even his interests in fashion. His sculptures are fantastic and futuristic forms that live between the fine line of abstracting and figuration.  Steve’s current exhibit titled Reanimate at the Nerman Museum Of Contemporary Art in Overland Park Kansas is not to be missed. The show will be up until May 8th.

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Mario Soria’s Eccentric Hyper-Real Paintings Of Pop Culture Icons

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Spanish artist Mario Soria creates stunning collage-esque paintings of iconic American images and figures such as Andy Warhol, Woody Allen, Marlene Dietrich, Audrey Hepburn, Sophia Loren, John F. Kennedy, and Abraham Lincoln. His portraits are hyper-realistic, but the seemingly random array of objects and contexts he places these figures within lends the work some eccentricity, a sense that is heightened by his use of embellished canvases and the simulated 3D effect of some of these protrusions.

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Mysterious Meyoko

meyokoinkdrawigI was perusing the Beautiful/Decay Creative Pic Flickr Pool this morning and came across Meyoko’s densely delicate ink drawings. Half Arcimboldo’s grotesque fruit heads, half seething with creatures from the garden of  Hieronymous Bosch‘s earthly delights, Meyoko’s works flit, tangle, weave, drip, and feather their way into strange specters. I realized I’ve seen her work before, somewhere, though I can’t recall exactly, so when it popped up on our Flickr page like a repeat-dream I was strangely enchanted- fitting I suppose! More works after the jump. I can’t seem to find any other information about her aside from her Flickr page. So, Meyoko, if you want to tell us who you are (or anyone knows the whereabouts of this mysterious ink-chanteuse) let me know!

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Wendy Ploger

Wendy Ploger is a New York-based photographer. In her series, INSIDE :: OUT, each piece is a pair of photographs that play off of each other. One photo was taken outside while one was taken inside, but that’s really the least interesting part. Placed next to each other, each photo complements the other with an obscure tension — pointing out each other’s beauty and flaws, commonalities and differences. None of the photos were staged which also sets up a contrast between the spontaneity of what each individual photo captures and the calculated pairings for presentation. Couldn’t have been easy.  

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Mary O’Malley’s Sea Creature Encrusted Pottery Mimics Our Daily Fight Against Nature

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Mary O’Malley is a New York based potter trained in traditional English and Japanese techniques. Her work is primarily an ode to her craft and an homage to her childhood spent by the sea. However, it is also structured around delicate binaries involving the human need to search for beauty. She states:

“The technical difficulties I began to encounter when enveloping the service ware with ferocious and unforgiving aquatic life got me thinking about a common need we all have to control our own representation of beauty. There is so much fastidious control involved in creating each one of the Bottom Feeder pieces, but with ceramics there is always a margin for error, and some degree of control must be sacrificed. The composition of barnacles and crustaceans populating each piece, the way the iron oxide discovers every nook of the creatures I’ve created, the way the tentacles warp in the firings, etc., is always a surprise. I’m never exactly sure how anything’s going to turn out.”

She fuses different modalities, both literally in her potting techniques as well as what each form represents. The more classic aspects of porcelain, the cream white tea pot, the gold rimmed vase, correlates with a more tamed, predictable side of life. These pure little moments of calm crafting are then overtaken by octopus tentacles, barnacles, and coral, representing the aspect of chaos the is inevitable in everyday life. She explains:

“This play between total control and inevitability has sustained my interest and attention because it mimics life in so many ways: we try our hardest to compose the aesthetics surrounding us—from the buildings and environments we live in to the way we dress and present ourselves. Our daily fight against nature is a fruitless pursuit, yet one we never seem willing to abandon. I find this play between forces endlessly challenging. The dance that results from trying to find a balance between what we can control and what we cannot is where I believe true beauty lies.” (Via Colossal)

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