Get Social:

Malia Jensen’s Sculptures Of Sensory Longing

Malia Jensen - Sculpture Malia Jensen - Sculpture

Malia Jensen - Sculpture

Malia Jensen juxtaposes deep sensory textures with completely opposite objects or animals to create a feeling of longing, sexuality, desire, or play. The pillow, tragically, will never be comfortable enough, born from cutting board wood. Likewise, the breast, shaped from a block of salt lick, will never be able to feel a tongue the way that it should. Each carefully chosen medium breathes a new heavy sadness into the life of these objects, condemned to mirror reality without all the glorious amenities or enjoyments.

Of her work, in ArtSlant Magazine, Jensen states, “You can seduce someone in, and they might be laughing for a while, but they realize this is somewhat dark. There’s a deep sadness in a lot of work. It’s like finding a human condition in an animal parallel.”

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Ai Weiwei Throws Paint All Over His Friends Wearing Expensive Designer Clothes

Ai Weiwei photograph - Designer Jacquemus

Ai Weiwei photograph - Designer KTZ

Ai Weiwei photograph - Designer Phoebe English

Ai Weiwei photograph - Designer Proper Gang

Ai Weiwei is causing a stir once again. This time his project involves 14 outfits from 14 different designers, left over paint, a custom built pedestal, his friends, a camera and a rebellious streak. Asked by V magazine to be involved in this special collaborative series in conjunction with Comme des Garçons, Weiwei was sent a box of the designers one-off creations and was allowed free reign to create an editorial campaign for the magazine. He proceeded to dowse his friends and colleagues wearing the clothes with the paint he had accumulated from his earlier 2006/2008 Colored Vases project.

Following his anarchic philosophy and approach to art, Weiwei throws colors all over the delicate and expensive outfits with abandon, just like he did in his vase series. He continues to destroy the hierarchies we have come to accept (this time those of the fashion world, and how to represent clothing as a commodity). Not one to stick to the rules or to adhere to people’s expectations, Weiwei arguably destroys the original craftsmanship of these outfits – many of which took large teams of skilled tailors days to finish. The results have had mixed reviews. One of the designers, Shaun Samson (who had lilac paint splashed all over his plaid ensemble) shares his thoughts:

I don’t know if it’s sad or positive that he decided to do the project this way, but the outcome is beautiful. (Source)

Some may say Weiwei has destroyed others’ works of art, but the controversial artist sees it very differently:

Pouring a color on an outfit creates a new condition for the design. It creates a midpoint between two conflicting ideas. Gravity and the shape of the clothes combine to create a unique moment. Using these cultural products as ready-mades celebrates and reinterprets the intention of creativity. I think this act shows my respect toward their creativity. (Source)

(Via Hyperallergic)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

What You See Is What You Get: Beer As Pantone

Txaber - design concept Txaber - design concept Txaber - design concept Txaber - design concept

Spanish graphic designer Txaber has come up with an ingenious idea. Now we can see what is on the inside – on the outside. He has teamed up the colors of different beer with various shades of Pantone. At this stage this snappy idea is only a design concept – Txaber has said no companies are interested in producing, “but hopefully they will see the light.” The simplicity of this packaging has struck a chord with many people, and is an expansion of a similar idea launched last year.

Called Beertone, two Swiss designers Alexander Michelbach and Daniel Eugster created a color wheel also based on Pantone guides. They envisioned a beer lover to assemble this color wheel and choose their preferred brew from it. Every type of beer has it’s own swatch with all relevant information: brewery name, alcohol content, an image of the bottle and numerical values for its color in CMYK, RGB, and HTML. With over 202 colors (and separate beer types) Michelbach and Eugster no doubt would have been kept busy taste testing.

Whether it is a color wheel or a yet-to-be-realized design concept, the idea of marketing brewed beer based on slick packaging seems to a popular one. Txaber’s approach is an elegant, simple, understated one and shows the best side of the world’s third most popular drink. Ranging from Pale Ale to Imperial Stout, these designers have got the range covered. “Because beer comes in more colors than yellow or blurry.” (Via Lost At E Minor)

Currently Trending

Interview: Sean Pecknold

unknown-4 

Sean Pecknold is a Seattle based artist who has created some incredibly poignant videos and animations. The video “White Winter Hymnal” for Fleet Foxes–a sort of time-turning-backwards retrogression via a magical crank — recently caught our eye here at B/D. Sean recently discussed that, as well his other works, inspiration, and  process behind creating his magical shorts.

 

Currently Trending

Chad Wys’s Readymades

Illinois-born artist Chad Wys‘s latest series Readymades ’11 consists of mixed media pieces that deconstruct found objects – such as frames, china and porcelain – by distorting and adding paint. The playfulness of the work completely reinvents the objects to make the familiar completely unfamiliar whilst adding new layers to bric-a-brac found around the home. More after the jump.

Currently Trending

Christine Morla

Christine Morla, Mixed Media

Inspired by her Filipino American and family background, Christine Morla‘s “sculpture-paintings” are crafted in such a meticuluos yet delicate manner, that is hard not to notice the layers and layers of paper woven flowers that are made up of Filipino snacks packaging that she uses as inspiration for the color palette in the pieces. The craft of weaving was passed down by her own father and using these many cultural references from her own family and culture, she crafts these representations of both abstract and digital environments highlighted in vibrant patchworks of colors.

Currently Trending

Danielle Duer’s Beautiful Oddities

I first encountered the work of Nashville-based painter and visual artist Danielle Duer at a local restaurant-slash-coffeeshop. The order line separating me from my hipster-approved gourmet grilled cheese — well, it was long, but I didn’t mind. All the while that we inched forward, salivating obscenely, my eyes were glued to the walls of the establishment, for it was there that a number of Duer’s creations hung. I may or may not have jostled a few fellow salivaters aside so as to get a clearer view of each piece, hanging there against haphazardly stuccoed walls beneath little strips of birch bark that simply read “Danielle Duer.” First thought: I want one.

Duer’s paintings and drawings couple dainty details with fanciful landscapes, all rendered in vivid color. Ships sail in from far off places and bears cavort on unicycles in imaginative scenes that would look right at home on book covers. As the artist once said, she learned as a child to create places, whether through writing, painting, or drawing, that were smothered with the most “delicious, bizarre scenery.” As her creations show, she is also well aware of the importance of “oddities and peculiarities” in making something beautiful.

Take a closer look at Danielle Duer’s beautiful somethings after the jump.

Currently Trending

Melissa Cooke’s Hyperrealistic Graphite Renderings Mimic Double Exposure Photographs

Melissa Cooke - graphite drawing Melissa Cooke - graphite drawing Melissa Cooke - graphite drawing Melissa Cooke - graphite drawing

Super talented Melissa Cooke draws so realistically that you would think her renderings are photographs. Instead of using pencil lines to outline her subjects and draft her compositions, she achieves incredible depth by dusting layers of graphite onto paper with a dry brush. Flirting between different mediums (photography, drawing and painting), she is an expert of achieving highly detailed, strongly contrasting, striking images.

For her series The Between Spaces, she blends two different angles together in one drawing, achieving an impressive effect of superimposed snapshots. Thanks to her unique graphite technique, her highlights seem to glow and radiate off the page. Hair turns from being a series of fine white lines dusted over a darker layer to being a delicate web of strands. Eyes have detailed reflections; the skin Cooke draws have pores; the faces have a complex structure of wrinkles and lines. Cooke says of her series:

The drawings ride the line between what is physical and emotional, inner and outer, real and fantasy. Elements that are innately indescribable.  There is a richness in those spaces that I can explore visually. (Source)

Moving on from portraiture, Cooke has also tried her hand at still lifes – objects that she finds in her daily life. Inspired by an abandoned wig she found in the dandelions, she started her series of objects.

These still lives evoke the figure while hinting at a larger narrative. There is both an attraction and repulsion to these discarded objects, like evidence left at a crime scene. That tension is something that has always inspired me, and will continue to propel me forward with the new body of work. (Source)

Currently Trending