Get Social:

Eudes De Santana

4614379577_ca5006eb48_z

Barcelona based fashion/advertising photographer and director, Eudes De Santana, originally went to school for graphic design. While finishing his degree, he worked on photographic commissions for fashion editorials, catalogs, and advertising campaigns. His work, exuding hip energy and sex, has us fantasize for this sort of lifestyle.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Chadwick Gibson’s curious sculptures

"View-Alters", Two Viewmatser Model-L Front Pieces, 2006

"View-Alters", Two Viewmatser Model-L Front Pieces, 2006

Los Angeles based artist Chadwick Gibson makes sculpture/devices that border on usability and absurdity by making the innards of various playground-use balls visible in his “Time Out Series” (can you still play tennis when your tennis balls are flipped inside out?), and combining the functionalities and inherent experiences in an elevator and a guillotine with the piece “Speed of Judgment” (mimicking a beheading followed by the sensation of floating above ones headless body).

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Awesome Video Of The Day: Robert Rauchenberg’s Monogram

Robert Rauchenberg is undoubtably one of the most important artists of our times. In this video he discusses how one of his most famous works “Monogram.”

Currently Trending

Plant Life at Western Exhibitions

Western Exhibitions in Chicago, IL recently opened an exhibition entitled Plant Life. The show was curated by Geoffrey Todd Smith and is on view through March 9th. The show brings together a group of artists with a wide variety of techniques as they approach the subject of plants, flowers, and weeds. From traditional still lifes to experimental assemblage the show injects life into age old motifs. From the press release: “Plant Life is a group exhibition of artists who take flowers, plants or weeds as their subject. Each artist transforms and manipulates, formally and conceptually, their leafy content through a variety of materials and manners of expression, asserting their idiosyncratic visions by obsessing over materials, offering the plants new context while broadening the relationship to their human neighbors.” The show features Jonathan GardenerChinatsu IkedaHeidi NortonTyson ReederMindy Rose SchwartzEric Wert, and Scott Wolniak.

Currently Trending

Kour Pour Recreates Carpets In Every Painstaking Detail

Kour Pour - PaintingKour Pour - Painting Kour Pour - Painting Kour Pour - Painting

Taking images from auction catalogs, artist Kour Pour translates intricately-patterned carpets onto paneled surfaces. The multi-step process is labor intensive, not to mention large – his work is 8 feet tall. First, Pour scans in the image of a rug and burns it on a silk screen. Then, he uses a broom to begin his underpainting (the texture gives it an appearance of a textile). Afterwards, he silkscreens the design to the panel and begins the work of painting every painstaking detail. The final step is to use an electrical sander to erase the painted surface and expose the layers of the under-painting. What results is work that looks like an faded, well-worn rug.

Pour is both British and Persian, and when he was younger, his father owned a rug shop in England. His work is tied to this past, as he explains in his artist statement:

Carpets were a part of my childhood growing up in England. I remember my Father’s rug shop, and how he would hand-dye sections of carpets that had faded away, in order to bring them back to their original colours. I felt that in doing this, my Father was making an effort to maintain all their history and meaning, as if he was bringing the carpets back to life. When I first moved to Los Angeles I had feelings of displacement and much like the faded carpets, I too felt a part of my history disappear. I started the carpet painting series and noticed how art and objects could play an increasingly important role in our diverse society. Through making these paintings I am constantly learning more about my background and the rich mix of culture that surrounds me and the carpets.

By recreating carpets, Pour highlights their meaning as object, as well as the implications of their surface design. They signify an object of privilege (as their originals come from an auction catalog), and our commodity-based consumer culture. Beyond that, the patterns of animals and men on horses is representational of globalization, a culture’s history, and more.  (Via Bmore Art and Flat Surface)

Currently Trending

Celebrate New Year’s with…Gin & Tonic Mist?

Why drink Gin & Tonics the old fashioned way through liquid, when you can suit up in a plastic hazmat rain coat and inhale your alcohol through the air? Food architects Bompas & Parr turn boozin’ into a brand new experience.

Currently Trending

Vintage Board Games from the Soviet Union

Retronaut recently posted a gallery of early Soviet-era Russian board game designs and illustrations. The images seem to be taken from a LiveJournal user by the name of babs71. You’ll find some seriously gorgeous propaganda here. The vintage illustrations depict workers young and old, soldiers bravely entering battle to defend the Motherland,and some nicely stylized industrial complexes. Find more hammer and sickle goodness after the jump.

Currently Trending

The Clayton Brothers Visit The Same Thrift Shop For Four Years For Their Latest Exhibit

clayton-Open-Public1

clayton-Open-Public3

clayton-Open-Public7

Artist duo Christian and Rob Clayton, who exhibit as The Clayton Brothers, found their muse at Sun Thrift, inspiring their latest show “Open to the Public.” Three to four years in the making, the artists visited the shop almost every other day to browse and people watch. Rob Clayton says:

“There are two aspects to this show: one side of it is the store itself and the employees that run it, and more importantly, the other side is the people that go there to get things they need.” (Source)

A third aspect could be said to be the pieces that the brothers purchased and brought into their studio, and sometimes into their finished works. Drawn to the handmade and personal the artists speculate on the embedded stories the objects can’t tell. They see the store itself as a curated collection of sorts, where the employees determine the exhibition by making connections and creating categories. Christian and Rob, inspired by this method of organization, say it inspired the way they worked for this show.

When creating, the brothers have an interesting method of collaboration. They work simultaneously in the same studio, leaving unfinished pieces out for the other to be inspired by and often to add to.

Rob elaborates, “At the studio we don’t say, ‘This is mine, that’s yours.’ We refer to the drawings that haven’t made it into the process yet as carcasses. If a painting sits around for a while, one of us will usually grab it all of a sudden and change it in some way. It’s a constant give and take.” Christian adds, “When do get into a heated spot with a piece, we know each other well enough to let things stew.” (Source)

Their different approaches and techniques are evident in this collection, and it is particularly apt. The varied stylistic choices — assemblage, drawing, collage—speak to the patchwork merchandise in the store as well as to the diverse shoppers.

“The characters that inhabit Open to the Public are overall a sweet bunch. They might look disjointed and fractured, or some might say disturbing, but our overall intent with these drawings was to gain an honest understanding of ourselves as humans. The objects that are discarded or donated to the thrift store become a direct reflection on us as people. We look at the objects like archaeologists, and there is narration attached to all of it. The stories of peoples lives, creative heartfelt moments, messages left for loved ones, forgotten memories… this is what has been driving our characters.” (Source)

Currently Trending