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Luis Dourado’s Departure series

Luis Dourado‘s Departure series’ digital manipulation of photography contorts and distorts geography to explore the power of imagination. The photographs of Spanish and Portugese mountains are regarded as departures away from civilisation, as the once formidable are changed into beautiful geometric patterning by Douardo’s imaginative capability. More after the jump.

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Aleksandra Domanović Striking Paper-Stack Prints

Aleksandra Domanović

Aleksandra Domanović stacks

Aleksandra Domanović stack sculptures

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Aleksandra Domanović deals with sculpture that echoes monuments from the past from her native (former) Yugoslavia. While some sculptures take on more traditional forms of post-Communist leaders, the Berlin-based artist also began experimenting with unique materials in her work. 19:30 Stacks was created by piling size A3 and A4 paper with photos printed on their sides with ink-jet printing. First creating a massive PDF file of a photo, Domanović set the printer to ‘border-less print’ setting, which coated the ends of each paper, and when stacked upon each other, revealed the finished image.

For a time this work was open-sourced so that anyone could make one for themselves by downloading the file (now broken), printing it out, and then placing it between 1500 empty pages on the top and bottom of the printed stack. According to her artist statement, Domanović’s “work focuses on profound social and media-technological transformations, and their interdependence. Some of her projects give form to the relationships of meaning imposed by archival models. Others suggest alternate models that draw on her observations of shared memory and feelings of community. Domanovic uses material related to her autobiography — the television, music, and monumental art of Yugoslavia — as well as materials that claim transcendence of the personal and national, such as Getty Images’ database of stock photography and (on the blog Vvork, which she co-edits) international contemporary art production.” (via u1u11)

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Illustrator Stefan Glerum Gives A Contemporary And Pop Take On The Ancient Art Of The Stained Glass

Stefan Glerum - Stained Glass Stefan Glerum - Stained Glass Stefan Glerum - Stained Glass Stefan Glerum - Stained Glass

Stefan Glerum is a Dutch artist known for his playful and eye-popping illustrations. He spent four years studying illustration at Academy St. Joost and also worked as an assistant to Joost Swarte, a celebrated comic book artist. His work is characterized by clownish figures engaged in various dynamic acts. Described as “a melting pot of illustration heritage,” Glerum’s style draws on the Art Deco, Russian Constructivist, Italian Futurist, and Bauhaus movements, infusing this creative mash-up with popular themes (Source).

Recently, on the wall of a housing complex in Amsterdam, Glerum designed a massive and unique work of site-based art: two stained glass windows installed on a housing complex that depict a cartoonish collage of the location’s history. Located on the front and back of the building, each window is 60 feet high. Heren 5 Architects built the complex, and Atelier Schmit fabricated the stained glass. The AFK supported the completion of this project.

The longer you look at this stunning work, the more you’ll unravel about the surrounding location. First and foremost, the windows are aligned like a chimneystack, referring to a Oostergasfabriek (a nineteenth-century gas factory) that once stood out in that area of Amsterdam. Following the abandonment of the factory at the beginning of the twentieth century, the area hosted other industrial and public spaces. The front window shows a swimming pool, an animal shelter, and the Don Bosco School; the back depicts a public bathing room for factory workers, the laboratory of Professor Ernst Laqueur, and musicians of the Red Fanfare who formerly rehearsed there. You can read a more thorough description of each window on Glerum’s website, and there is a video about the construction here.

What makes the windows so spectacular is the artist’s seamless combination of historical periods and human environments. From military maneuvers to the coal industry to animal care, his loony figures crash together in a time-transcending and spirited symphony. Glerum’s art is not unknown to B/D; he is included in our Book 7: Class Clowns, and even designed the cover art. If you enjoy Glerum’s work—and, furthermore, are curious about artists who use similar styles of humor to engage and challenge us—you can purchase a copy of Book 7 on our shop page. Limited copies are still available.

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James Gallagher

Check out the collages of James Gallagher on the Pool Gallery site.

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Michael Caine’s Political Fairytales

Michael Caine’s current work situates American political figures, both past and present, in altered 18th century paintings and Christian religious kitsch, referencing scenes from Alice in Wonderland, Bambi, and the Wizard of Oz. Drawing on the lineage of political cartooning in these pictures, Caines treats Richard Nixon, JFK, and Carl Rove, among others, with surprising tenderness and humor.

 

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A Traveling Installation Series Inspired by Famous Works of Architecture

 

 

French artist Xavier Veilhan is staging a series of site-specific sculptural installations in various international, architecturally significant structures as part of a project entitled Architectones. To kick off the series, the artist is presenting works at the Richard Neutra VDL Research House in L.A. The works on view at the Neutra VDL Research House (exhibit closes September 16th) are inspired by modernity, Richard Neutra, and the house itself, where the artist stayed with his family while completing each piece in the show; an echo of Neutra’s family life. Curated by Francois Perrin, the exhibit features models of cars and boats, a metal flag, and more.

Over the next year, the VDL project will be followed by Pierre Koenig’s Case Study House #21 (1958); the roof of Le Corbusier’s Cité Radieuse, Marseille (1952), (set for spring 2013); St. Bernadette du Banlay Church (1966) by Claude Parent and Paul Virilio, Nevers, France; and the Melnikov House (1929) in Moscow. After the jump, more pictures of the show. (Photographs by Joshua White).

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BEAUTIFUL/DECAY IS HIRING BLOG CONTRIBUTORS!

BD CONTRIBUTOR

Do you know thousands of artists and designers who need to get some well deserve exposure? Do love writing about art and want an outlet? Do you want over a million monthly readers from around the world  reading and hanging on your every word? Do you want to join Beautiful/Decay in our quest for all things groundbreaking and creative? If so then send a few short writing samples (or links) as well as a cover letter about why you want to join the Beautiful/Decay blog contributor team to contactbd(at)beautifuldecay.com.

We are looking for smart writers and contributors in all corners of the globe who have their hands on the pulse of the contemporary art and design world and want to join our independent group of writers, critics, and art enthusiasts. Writers must be able to commit to a minimum of five 300 word posts per week.  This is a paid part-time freelance position.

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Fabio Viale’s Marble Sculptures That Look Like Styrofoam

What at first may look like a Styrofoam Mona Lisa is actually incredibly detailed marble work by Italian artist Fabio Viale. Yes you read that right. Marble. Viale does some incredible work to modernize this “old-fashioned” medium, like re-creating Greek Korus torsos and hands covered in tattoos. He is able to transform this heavy, bulky material into creations that seem light and airy, like old beat up tires, popcorn or crumpled paper bags. Viale even went so far as to create a marble motorboat he called Ahgalla, which remarkably he used to navigate the rivers north of Italy. 

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