Get Social:

Made With Color Presents: Colette Robbins’ Landscape Paintings Made With Graphite And Dremel Sanders

Colette Robbins

Colette Robbins

Colette Robbins

Beautiful/Decay has partnered with premiere website building platform Made With Color  to bring you some of the most exciting contemporary artists working today. Made With Color allows you to create a website that is professional and accessible with just a few clicks and no coding. This week we bring you the desolate and eerie landscapes of Colette Robbins .

New York based artist Colette Robbins’ intricate works on paper lie somewhere between the medium of drawing and painting. Colette painstakingly creates each drawing by dissolving graphite powder with water to create thousands of transparent layers of graphite in a technique borrowed from old master glaze painting. She then takes various erasers and even a Dremel sanding tool to the surface to add highlights and other details. The result is a wondrous world of imaginary landscapes with monolithic heads that may remind you of Easter Island or some other ancient ruin filled with mystique and awe.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Zander Blom

Untitled or The Boulevard, Bedroom 1 Corner 2, 5.11pm, Friday 1 June 2007

Untitled or The Boulevard, Bedroom 1 Corner 2, 5.11pm, Friday 1 June 2007

Zander Blom creates photographs derived from constructed paper installed throughout his London studio recalling Modernist abstraction as demonstrated by Mondrian and Schwitters. The crisp and jagged explosions of shape and color cascade along the nooks and crevices of corners and in-between spaces of ceiling and walls, creating disorienting movement and illusion.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Abstract ‘Paintings’ Made From Coogi Sweaters

Jayson Musson painting1 Jayson Musson painting3

Jayson Musson painting6

The abstract ‘paintings’ by artist Jayson Musson (also known by his alter-ego Hennessy Youngman) are created from piecing together Coogi sweaters, a brand of sweater popular in the late 1980’s and early 90’s.  The sweaters carry especially specific associations – Clifford Huxtable of the TV sitcom the Cosby Show or the rapper Notorious B.I.G.  However, the sweaters are also known for a specific style that lends itself well to abstract art.  Musson elaborates:

“The thing I found most alluring about Coogi sweaters was how painterly they were. They seemingly lingered on the borders of gestural abstraction. I made the joke, “That Coogi looks like a Pollock”. Over the course of the following weeks, I began collecting images of the sweaters, studying their composition. They seemed to defy the traditional logic of the textile, opting instead to appear spontaneous and created by hand rather than machine-made. Each sweater, though a manufactured object seemed to seek its own authenticity.” [via]

Currently Trending

Rob Bondgren

Rainbowlickbd

Rob Bondgren is an artist coming out of Chicago. His artwork takes a bit of reality and pushes it into a hallucinogenic state.

Currently Trending

Surprising Reactions To George Ferrandi Falling Asleep On Strangers In Subway

George Ferrandi - Performance

Personal space, something that’s cherished in the United States, is put to the test in Brooklyn-based artist George Ferrandi’s series, I Felt Like I Knew You. This site-specific performance features Ferrandi on the crowded New York City subway. In her words, she transforms the space between two people from being stiff and guarded to something that resembles a space friends would share. Essentially, she sits in a packed subway car, rests her head on a stranger’s shoulders, and documents what happens through iPhone videos shot by Angela Gilland.

Not surprisingly, not everyone is receptive to Ferrandi’s invasion of their “personal bubble.” Some people wake her up or passive aggressively move their shoulder. Some, however, just let her rest. In an interview with Katherine Brooks of the Huffington Post, Ferrandi was asked if she learned anything from the project. Her response:

For me, this piece taps into the mystery and fragility of how we relate and communicate to each other as human animals, full of signs secret even to ourselves. It’s given me a deeper understanding of the way New Yorkers evolve to maintain their privacy in public spaces. We carry our energy so closely. We’re often pressed up against each other on the train with a kind of “I wish I wasn’t touching you” energy that is invisible but respected. This is part of why so many people are touched by a photo of one man resting his head on the shoulder of another; it challenges a preconception about tenderness between strangers, especially in New York. And it offers a tiny counterpoint to the Culture of Fear being cultivated in America.

All images are stills from iPhone videos. They make you ponder how you would act if Ferrandi put her head on your shoulder. Would you engage her or move your shoulder? (Via Huffington Post)

Currently Trending

A Neon Message From Your Environment

Jung Lee - Public Art Jung Lee - Public ArtJung Lee - Public Art

We interrupt this broadcast to bring you an important message from your environment courtesy of Jung Lee, master translator, whose photographs place neon signage in unconventional places, working as emotive subtitles.

Each piece reminds us– it’s not necessarily the people we are searching for in relation to love, but the lingering romanticism of time and space: the feeling of earth cradling our fall.

Currently Trending

Shadow Is A Cyberpunk Dance Performance With Drones

Shadow - Rhizomatiks Elevenplay
Shadow - Rhizomatiks Elevenplay Shadow - Rhizomatiks Elevenplay

“Shadow” is a technological and artistic collaboration between design collective Rhizomatiks and dance troupe elevenplay. Featuring a dancer alongside three drones, “Shadow” feels like a cyberpunk performance from the future. It’s a surreal technodream of algorithmic and human elegance.

The strobe lights make the performance almost feel like glitchy stop motion. It also plays with shadow and light, by turns making the dancer’s shadow look larger than life and then, in the next moment, like a doll spinning on top of a music box.
Both Rhizomatiks and elevenplay hail from Japan, where they are a part of a wave of multidisciplinary artists that seek to explore the intersections of man and machine. In an interview with D&AD, Rhizomatiks says,
“We all have passion for and expertise in technical matters, and wanted to use this to set our imagination free across the disciplinary boundaries of design, art and entertainment. We like to challenge existing formats, from interactive to spatial design.”  (h/t Laughing Squid)

Currently Trending

Jason Rood’s Bearded Monsters

I love Jason Rood’s illustrations and the way he incorporates his sense of humor into his work.  Especially his beard series; so tight!

Currently Trending