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Bat For Lashes’ New Album, The Haunted Man is out Later this Month. Preview Six Songs Now

It’s been sometime since we’ve heard from Natasha Khan’s Bat For Lashes, but that all changes on Oct. 23 when her new album, The Haunted Man is released in the US on Capital Records. The Guardian has a preview of six songs that I’ve been listening to on repeat . She’s playing a handful of shows in Europe in the next couple of months so definitely try to see her live if you can. What do you think of the cover photo by Ryan McGinley?

Want more Bat For Lashes? Check out the video for the new single Laura after the jump!

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Graphic Paper Cut Outs Transformed Into Street Art

Joe Boruchow graphic cut outs Joe Boruchow street art1

Joe Boruchow street art9

Street Artist Joe Boruchow is an expert at manipulating positive and negative space.  His work intertwines stark black and white graphic cut outs, often cleverly playing each off the other.  Boruchow’s street art compositions are made up of simple but powerful images, wheat paste posters in public spaces.  He interacts with his work, much like a stencil or etching, indeed, frequently creating corresponding cut paper pieces of his posters.  While adeptly balancing positive and negative space in each poster, Boruchow also give careful attention to the postivie and negative space of the city.  His posters can be found filling empty areas of doorways, windows, and walls.

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John Mooney

Good luck finding this guy on the web. Heres a hint: he’s NOT John Mooney the blues guitarist. Aren’t these oil paintings great though? His shows covered Scotland, Helsinki, London and Poland, Contemporary Art Society, Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Scottish Arts Council and Dundee Art Gallery.

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Next Day Flyers Presents: Ian Addison Hall

Ian Addison Hall’s Patterns of Science series is named after a program created by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (Unesco) shortly after World War II. The program’s purpose was to prevent an apocalyptic third world war by promoting intercultural understanding. At the time many thought the fundamental cause of international conflict was humanity’s failure to realize the ideals of a world community and that we are all grounded in common values.

Using vintage catalog imagery, each piece in this series explores the relationship between the patterns that exist in fashion and the patterns that comprise human genetics. While a clothing pattern is designed to make the wearer look and feel different than everyone else, when expanded over the model’s exposed skin it instead represents the common biological and emotional framework that we all share. Acknowledging the shared traits that we all share will encourage empathy, compassion, and better understanding.

 

Presented by the offset rack card printing company, Next Day Flyers.

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Sasquatch 2011

A fun animated video created by World Famous to promote the Sasquatch Music Festival Line-Up. Full video after the jump.

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Matt Mahurin’s Widely Varied Creative Output

 

Illustrator/Photographer/Filmmaker Matt Mahurin has published illustrations in Time Magazine, Rolling Stone, The New York Time, and more. He’s compiled photo essays on the homeless, people infected with HIV/AIDS, the Texas prison system, and more. He’s directed music videos for artists like Tom Waits, R.E.M., Metallica, David Byrne, and MORE. That word- “more”, comes to mind a lot when going through Mahurin’s work. He just seems to be doing everything at once. And he does it so well. I’m always astounded when I come across a multidisciplinary artist making work in each of his or her chosen platforms that’s just as good, if not better than that of artists who choose to focus in only one area of practice. I mean it’s just not fair. Check out more of Mahurin’s widely varied projects after the jump.

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Lucy Glendinning’s Strange And Beautiful Feathered Figures

Lucy Glendinning

Lucy Glendinning

Lucy Glendinning

Lucy Glendinning

British sculptor Lucy Glendinning creates  ‘Feather Child’, a bird-like, human-like  creature. This strange project originates from Glendinning’s fascination with personal visions, expectations and fears about the future of a highly technologically advanced society. ‘Feather Child’, acting as a semiotic medium,  specifically embodies Glendinning’s questions about the future of genetic manipulation in such a world. The feathers, apart from making a point about what a possible genetically manipulated being might look like, are also a reference to the classic tale of human hubris: Greek mythology’s Icarus.

The feathered child begs its spectator to ponder upon the reality of such fantastical but absurd creations in a world where this will most certainly become a possibility. Will we be able to resist altering our physical abilities and looks if we had to ability to change them? Furthermore, will we, like Icarus, defy our abilities, change them, and as a consequence have everything we worked for fall apart?

Time will only tell what the future has in store for us. (via IGNANT)

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Paintings Depict Environmental Low And High Brow Decadence

Jean Lowe - Painting

Jean Lowe - PaintingJean Lowe - Painting How does our plastic/synthetic “throw away” culture affect not only our values, but also our environment? Walmart retail may seem cost effective and conservative, but in a glutton abundance, it’s possibly just as decadent as the upper echelons of collecting from the Renaissance or Baroque times. By placing disposal items such as Coors beer, shelves or detergent, and bargain bin t-shirts under a canopy of classically rich “painted” ceilings in her work, Jean Lowe cleverly examines these ironies and more.

Regarding this fiscal clashing, David Pagel suggests, “This compromise between high art and low culture suggests that splitting the difference between extremes creates a mutation both queasy and questionable.”

This is what makes each piece striking– Lowe is not just easily questioning consumerism’s role in art, but instead asking us to consider where art lives and who it lives for. It’s not just about “what” but “how” such blending or bleeding confuses, masks, or tempers our own sense of place and thought.

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