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Allison L. Wade Turns Her Own Break-Up Text Messages Into Art

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Breaking up is hard to do. And, if executed via text message, it can be even harder.

In her solo exhibition, “It’s Not You,” artist Allison L. Wade explores the proliferating plague of the break-up text. Featuring much-anticipated new additions to her acclaimed series, “Break-Up Texts,” this exhibition once again draws inspiration from the artist’s own love life.

Presented as blocks of text set against painted and photographic backdrops, the text messages featured in “It’s Not You” include those both “sent and received by the artist during dissolving personal relationships.” Citing irony as the basis of her series, Wade’s seemingly arbitrary selection of backdrops—spanning solid, lurid colors, computer-generated gradients, and peculiar images lacking context—emphasize the level of detachment present in the modern-day break-up text.

By pairing emotionally-charged, life-changing words with generic, ambivalent backgrounds, Wade successfully demonstrates the inherent disconnect between break-up texts and the emotions that prompt them.

While some of the text messages featured in “It’s Not You” are bizarrely comical (“Sorry I have been out of touch this week. There was a snow storm and I have been watching movies”), others are undeniably poignant, such as the bleak declaration, “I knew you would do this to me.” Whether silly or sad, it is certain that, as individuals in the 21st Century, there is a break-up text we can all relate to. (via Rick Wester Fine Art)

Check out “It’s Not You” now through January 10, 2015 at New York’s Rick Wester Fine Art!

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MARQUISMONTES

Collaborators Marquismontes must be a fashion shoot chameleon, able to shoot in hundreds of various styles, looks, and techniques that keeps the viewer on their toes and wondering what  they’ll do next!

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Eduardo Kobra’s Street Art Inserts Nostalgic Imagery Into Contemporary Environments

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Take a stroll along the High Line in NYC and you can’t help but notice Chelsea’s very own eye-popping mural by Eduardo Kobra on 25th and 10th. This towering piece of street art infuses a rainbow bolt of color into Manhattan’s skyline, emoting nostalgic imagery: re-imagining Alfred Eisenstaedt’s 1945 classic photograph “VJ Day in Times Square.” Likewise, if you live along the west coast in LA, you might have noticed Kobra’s psychedelic Mt. Rushmore redeux at 1255 La Brea Ave, exposing the art of democracy.

Interestingly, this artist is not from America, but São Paulo, where his passion for blending vintage or classic iconic imagery into contemporary settings first emerged in the late 1980s and has traveled internationally ever since. The intention was and is to pay homage to the parts of a country’s past or remind the city inhabitants of their historical precedents–  emphasizing a certain level of romanticism.

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Peat Duggins

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Watercolor, gouache and ink paintings by once Austin, TX now Cambridge, MA artist Peat Duggins.  The detail images are telling of a cartoon-apocalypse and I have to say I’m not a morbid or pessimistic person, however I enjoy dooms-day movies and I’m growing fond on such themes in artwork where humans are gone and nature takes over.  This is different though, it’s sweet.

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Michael Steele’s Pop Culture Cluster Paintings

Michael Steele lives and works in Australia. He utilizes familiar elements from cartoons and films such as Back To The Future, Ghostbusters, Masters Of The Universe, and Star Wars to create pop culture cluster paintings. Typography, characters, weapons, landmarks, and other recognizable objects are consolidated into one large iconographic mass. Deciphering what the objects are sourced from allows for a dissection and assimilation of pop culture while also commenting on the bombardment of entertainment and advertisement.

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Seishi

It’s hard to pull off creepy, minimal, beautiful, and dark all in the same video but it’s accomplished in Stefan Werc‘s Seishi video.

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Ewa Juszkiewicz Paints Surreal Portraits Of Mollusk-Headed Women

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The women in Ewa Juszkiewicz‘s portraits have experienced a decapitation of an unusual sort: their heads replaced by a series of inanimate object from plants to mollusks.

“In my paintings I take critical view on the way women have been pictured in history of painting and other visual media up to today,” Juszkiewicz explains in her artist’s statement. “I work mostly in the field of portrait, which I intend to approach from a different angle that avoids focusing on the appearance.”

Her paintings, which are based on real historical portraits, seem to draw on some sort of surreal symbolism, perhaps meaningful partly because of their inscrutability. “I am interested in how the replacement of the face by different forms changes the perception of the human figure,” Juszkiewicz says.

In pursuit of that, she erases the identities of the women she portrays, completing their objectification literally. Her subjects are robbed of any sort of expression, instead gazing out at the viewer with an impassive beetle’s head or a shroud of cloth. (via Artnau)

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Meredith Dittmar Sculpts The Scale Of The Universe In Clay

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Portland based Meredith Dittmar draws on the world around her as inspiration for her delicately formed compositions. Made entirely from polymer clay, she twists, squeezes, slices and weaves different shades together to form her distinctive artworks. Reminiscent of fantasy computer games, scientific drawings and algorithms, and including organic forms of vines, leaves and trees, Dittmar’s work is a beautiful combination of science and art; man and nature; patterns and rhythms.

She cites her influences as:

“the mushrooms found in our forest, Eames power of 10, and the visualizations of complex math, science, and especially theoretical physics.”

The idea of a “Cosmic Zoom” that Dittmar displays in her work is very evident. She simultaneously depicts the Universe at a large scale, including cities, forests and planets; while also focusing in on it at a minute scale – including quarks, atoms and molecule structures.
She often includes some sort of figures in her work to add a human scale.
These can be anything from human hands holding a form, or body parts being split open by triangles. Known also for designing different characters in polymer, Dittmar sculpts these into her landscapes. Alien-like creatures with big eyes bring a strange sense of humanity to her work. They make you feel like you are viewing your own world, and something quite different. Dittmar and her creations definitely bring a new sense of wonder to the simple things around us. She points out, that maybe things aren’t that simple, after all.

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