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Stunning Photographs Of A Landfill Mansion Made Out Of Trash

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Mark Andrew Boyer, a Graduate student at UC Berkeley’s Journalism school, met Bob Anderson (the man featured on Boyer’s photographs), a former professional boxer, while on a walk through The Albany Bulb, a landfill situated on a fist-shaped peninsula that juts into the San Francisco Bay.

The Albany Bulb, serves the community’s poorest, as many homeless men and women call it, home.

 “I was walking on the shore and heard some hammering in the distance. I followed the sound, and there was this guy building this huge structure.” -Boyer

That guy, as Boyer recalls him, is Bob Anderson, a man who has lived in the landfield since 2011 when he was forced to move out of his Berkley home after his mother’s death-since then he has become homeless. Before that, Anderson had been a professional boxer living and fighting in Las Vegas.

Bob is certainly not your average homeless man.

Anderson’s current place stands strong and tall amongst the highest of trash mounds found at The Albany Bulb. Its astonishing look- one that contains unintended artistic merit- captured the eye of Boyer whom was later compelled to photograph the life of Anderson is his landfill mansion.

The journalist spent a week with Anderson photographing him and his three-story domain, which upon closer inspection was even more amazing than it looked from the outside.

“There could be a shipping pallet next to a mirror next to a piece of plywood next to a mandolin that he’s shoved in between the cracks. It’s a really interesting mix of objects, it’s ever changing. Every time I went back it looked completely different. I went out for a walk once and he had stuck a wind surfing sail on the top of it.”

(via Slate)

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Toyin Odutola

 

Toyin Odutola’s arresting drawings map every curve, line, and pore on the human body.

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Artwork Of The Day: 212 Slaves

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, written by Mark Twain, has been the source of much controversy over the years due to the frequent use of the  “N word”and other racial slurs. In this piece, An artist called Someguy has blacked out the entire text of the book, except for the 212 instances of the word.

This piece brings to light many interesting points in the debate of censorship and hate speech. It was announced in the begining of 2011 that one book publisher with rights to ‘Huckleberry Finn’ will re-release the book with all instances of the word replaced by the “slave” instead. What do you think about this situation? Should this hateful word be stricken from the pages of all books or should we not censor the works of authors and writers?

 

 

 

 

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The Art Of Disappearing: Stefanie Klavens Documents Vanishing Drive-Ins

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Stefanie Klavens has a love for 20th century pop culture and Americana. In her articulate photographic series, titled “Vanishing Drive-Ins,” Klavens documents the disintegration of the American drive-in. Once a popular social and entertainment aspect, it has been slowly disappearing from the United States. As Klavens explains, “The drive-in has suffered the same fate as the single screen theater. Before World War II the drive-in was a modest trend, but after the war the craze began in earnest, peaking in popularity in the late 1950s and early 1960’s. Drive-ins were ideal for the modern family, everyone jumped into the car, no babysitter needed. ‘Car culture’ had officially arrived as a dominant force on the American scene.”

Despite the rapid popularity of the drive-in, they simply could not stand the test of time. Klavens attributes their decline to the evolution of technology and altered views of land: “Over time, changing real estate values began to have an effect on the drive-in. Land became too valuable for a summer-only business. Widespread adoption of daylight saving time in the mid 1960’s subtracted an hour from outdoor evening screening time. The decline was further hastened by the advent of VCRs and home video rentals. In the 1950s there were over 4,000 drive-ins nationwide. Today there are fewer than 400.”

These photographs, with their heavily saturated colors and blurry prolonged exposures, showcase some of the few drive-ins that are still functioning with a romantic nostalgia. The structures and signage may be antiquated, but the car types and models are a dead ringer for our era.

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A Kassen at Gallery Nicolai Wallner

Gallery Nicolai Wallner in Copenhagen recently opened a new solo exhibition by Copenhagen based art collective A Kassen. The group describes their work as “…performative installation and sculpture. Actions, discretely part of the exhibition space, are characteristc of A Kassen’s works. The actions may even be so discrete, they don’t get noticed. But if they do get noticed, they contain strong elements of humor and surprise.” The group’s discretely humorous style can be found in pieces in which the four sides of the frame have been planed down and the resulting sawdust has been transferred onto paper with glue. Another example is Permanent Reflection, a piece that is described in the press release: “Permanent Reflection consists of four framed photos that are placed perpendicular to each other in two separate corners of the exhibition space. The images appear to be distorted by reflections due to the framing glass, but are in fact photographs capturing the reflection of the site”. The show is on view through May 18th 2013.

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Tom Sachs Puts His Collection of Homemade Boomboxes On Display

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We all love a good boombox – but probably not as much as Tom Sachs. He has dedicated a whole exhibition to speakers, cables, and different sound system configurations. Tom Sachs: Boombox Retrospective 1999–2015 is exactly what it sounds like – a display of functional boomboxes made by Sachs and play 60 minute playlist created by the artist, friends and fans created throughout the show (Kanye West being one contributor). A fan of 1980’s street culture combined with his D.I.Y and punk ethos, Sachs has been fashioning different sound systems for a long time – he has even crafted functional ceramic boomboxes in the past.

With his love for raw materials, assemblage and with his homemade aesthetic, Sachs has created many unstated feats of engineering. His past projects include recreating Knoll office furniture out of only telephone books and duct tape, building a whole McDonalds store out of plywood and glue, and making numerous Hello Kitty sculptures out of anything from foam core to bronze. But this show is the first time we see just how many time Scahs can rebuild one theme over and over again.

Louis Grachos from The Contemporary Austin explains how impressed they are with Sach’s work, and how his ideologies and attitude match the city his pieces are shown in:

I have worked with Tom Sachs on several projects in the past, and I am very excited to introduce his work to Austin [Texas]. Like Austin, Tom takes his eccentricities seriously. The maverick spirit of self-reliance and attention to hand-crafted precision that come through in his work will keenly resonate with our audiences in Central Texas and beyond. (Source)

(Via The Creator’s Project)

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Paul Rice

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Paul Rice makes some striking posters for bands and movies.

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Robert Minervini

Robert Minervini’s paintings are an accurate representation of how the true Los Angeles appears to me. Polluted atmosphere, palm trees (not native to LA) implanted everywhere, crumbling and tired buildings, freeway ramps… this is what my home looks like.

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