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Nychos’ Head Splitting GRaffiti

When it comes to graffiti the weirder the better and Austrian writer Nychos delivers on every front. From bold candy coated lettering that is slashed and dashed with spilling guts to heads splitting into a dozen pieces this talented writer does not disappoint. Check out a more murals by Nychos and a short video of his collaboration with Flying Fortress after the jump.

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Toyin Odutola

 

Toyin Odutola’s arresting drawings map every curve, line, and pore on the human body.

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Bionic Beauty Viktoria Modesta Shows Off Her Futuristic Prosthetic Leg

prosthetic leg

Viktoria Modesta - Music

prosthetic leg

Viktoria Modesta - Music

Singer and model Viktoria Modesta isn’t satisfied with just the practical everyday. After having to amputate her leg because of medical reasons, she’s reinvented herself as a cyborg pop star, performing graceful pirouettes and sexy catwalks, completely unencumbered by her prosthetic limb.

In her collaboration with Channel 4, Modesta released a music video (watch it after the jump) called “Prototype,” which features her doing a breathtaking dance using her bionic leg like the blade of a knife. It’s a dramatic display of sci-fi elegance, one that ends with the slogan, “Some of us were born to be different; some of us were born to take risks.”

Modesta echoed this sentiment in past interviews, saying, “The time for boring ethical discussions around disability is over. It’s only through feelings of admiration, aspiration, curiosity and envy that we can move forward.” (via Bored Panda)

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Robot Makes Paintings

 

I always thought that robots would one day make all the art in the world but I never imagined that the day would be so near. Benjamin Grosser’s Interactive Robotic Painting Machine uses artificial intelligence to paint its own body of work and to make its own decisions. While doing so, it listens to its environment and considers what it hears as input into the painting process. In the absence of someone or something else making sound in its presence, the machine, like many artists, listens to itself. Watch a video of the robot in action after the jump!

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Painting With Thread: Stephanie Kelly’s Finely Detailed Embroidery Dwellings

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Stephanie Kelly art

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Salt Lake City based artist Stephanie Kelly creates beautifully detailed illustrations out of thread. The series featured here is entitled “Dwellings” and speaks to the theme of domesticity that informs Kelly’s use of embroidery and her attempt to reclaim craft as fine art. Painting with thread instead of oils gives her work depth and tactility, creating rich and voluminous textures and blends. Kelly embroiders thread and fabric wallpaper pieces onto stretched canvases, which gives her work this remarkably detailed multi-textured design. Kelly began as a painter and illustrator, and was eventually given the opportunity to work with whatever medium she desired and decided to combine her skills with her love of craft. Kelly says her grandmother taught her to embroider and that this has largely inspired the domestic theme that permeates her work. Kelly’s painter’s eye applied to embroidery reminds me of the last embroidery work I posted, featuring Ana Tereza Barboza. You can watch a video profile of Kelly after the jump. (via from89)

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Matthew Palladino

Lesbian Jail Wedding

23 year old artist Matthew Palladino has been getting a good amount of press, from his show at Park Life to his interview on Fecal Face, and it’s really no surprise because his pieces are conceptually unique and universally beautiful. I’m intrigued by the subjects of his paintings and sometimes titles of his work, for instance, the painting above is titled “Lesbian Jail Wedding”.

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Cristina de Middel’s Photographs Narrate The Story Of A Mythical Boy From Nigeria

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Documentary photographer Cristina de Middel’s striking new series, This is What Hatred Did, displays a collection of beautifully cinematic photographs that bend the boundary between reality and magic. Her photographs are both playful, yet inherently insightful. The series acts as a photographic narrative of Amos Tutuola’s book, “My Life in the Bush of Ghosts,” a novel loosely based on Yoruba folklore. Written in child’s prose, the book follows a 5 year old Nigerian child whose village was attacked by soldiers, leaving him without his mother, and provoking him to flee in order to avoid the chaos. He manages to find his way into a magical bush where no humans are allowed. The novel follows him for 30 years, during which he achieves many states of being. Tutuola’s book, published in 1964, caused him to flee the country due to a violent reaction, leading him to open a new path for African literature. Cristina de Middel explains the series; she states:

“The series “This Is What Hatred Did” (derived from the mysterious last sentence of the book) aims to provide an illustrated contemporary version of the book, adapting the characters, and ambiance to the current situation of the country. The “Bush” is now the Lagosian neighborhood of Makoko, a floating slum with its own rules, commanded by Kings and community leaders, often the subject of popular media coverage. A place where logic does not prevail and forbidden for those who do not belong. With the conviction that contemporary issues should be described in a way that includes the agent’s traditions, perspectives, fears, and hopes, this series documents the enhanced reality of one of the most iconic places in Nigeria.”

Cristina de Middel, a spanish born artist now living on London, is known for her important, self-published photo book, The Afronauts, 2012.

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The light Is Wiggly In This Shell Game: New Paintings By Melissa Brown

dowsing700h_960nightsurf1_960ShellGameCoverImageMelissa Brown is a printmaker who has turned her attention towards painting and animation.  Her paintings repeat imagery in the way a print might, but also take on the physical quality of paint.  This hybridity allows the paintings to have elements that are both familiar and strange.  Brown’s animation is also a hybrid of print and paint.  The animation you are about to click on is set to a mellow carnivalesque tune.  Melissa has worked with games, in their various forms, to create her art.  She has used the folded paper Fortune Teller we all used in grade school, and all the way up to an all-night performance on how to win the State Lottery in front of a movie screen filled with diagrams.  Brown’s new animation keeps with this interest in games.  It is based on an old street con, the shell game.  You can see that animation in the Dinter Project Room.

When I have spoken to Melissa about her work she always starts by telling me something very technical, like something about the lighting, but we eventually talk about how the patterns and spaces in the work make us feel.  This new work has a sort of physical effect on me, like a great bass line that comes out of nowhere, and, even though you’re in a bad mood, makes you dance with your seat belt on at a red light in your car at an intersection.  Brown is in a group show at a Bright Lyons called Freak Furniture Fan Club with two other great printmakers Leif Golberg and Erin Rosenthal.

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