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Pinched, Pulled And Crumpled Wood Sculptures From Cha Jong-Rye

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The work of Korean artist Cha Jong-Rye looks like anything but wood.  Her large pieces hang on the wall as if they were draped cloth, strange liquids, and geological formations.  Her peculiar choice of medium undoubtedly references these and other ideas of nature and the home.  She painstakingly carves her work from wood, often from hundreds of small pieces.  She seems to crumple, pinch, and pull a material that’s especially rigid, typically found as a tree or house.  They’re temptingly tactile – if no one in the gallery noticed I’d nearly be enticed to drag my fingers across their surface. [via]

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Giants Carrying Power Lines from Choi + Shine

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These images are from the design studio of the architecture and design firm Choi + Shine.  The concept is to transform simple power line pylons into massive sculptures.  The firm says, “Making only minor alterations to well established steel-framed tower design, we have created a series of towers that are powerful, solemn and variable.”  The figures would be designed to interact with their function as well as the landscape.  Some figures would appear to be climbing up hill.  Others would crouch for increased strength as if to bear the weight of the wires on their shoulders.  All would serve to enhance the landscape while also serving a utilitarian purpose.

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While combining realism and expressionism, Mao Yanyang new works surprises the observer with very audacious paintings. Using daily broadcasted images he appeals to the spectator’s collective and individual memory shaped true years of media confrontation.

But there’s a very big difference between those known images and Mao Yanyang’s Works. The audacity of the artist’s ideas is expressed true the constant presence of several microphones in every single one of his paintings. This presence might seem kind of irrelevant and surreal, certainly when the artist is depicting war scenes, but they symbolize in fact the transformation of our world into an image consuming universe.

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Peter Wu- Segmented Reality

Wait- we haven’t featured Peter Wu on the blog yet?! Dude’s even from L.A!  Showpaper in NYC hipped me to the artist a couple months back, when they illustrated a cover with one of his segmented, semi-schizophrenic mixed media works, and my brain muscles are still tingling. Looks like he’s been doing a lot of sculpture lately and has a solo coming up at Greene Exhibitions fairly soon. A few images after the jump, but be sure to check out his website for more.

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Li Jikai


Li Jikai is a Chinese artist who makes wonderfully melancholy sculptures and paintings. And even though he is well known in Asia, I had never seen his work before visiting Dialogue Space Gallery’s booth at the LA Art Show – a massive art exhibition being held in the convention center downtown. His piece “Daydream” of a young boy laying on his back and holding his legs against his chest drew me straight towards it, so I battled the waves of artwork at the convention center to get a closer look. And after inspecting the piece and meeting the gallery’s director, I turned the corner and became totally entrenched in Jikai’s world full of lonely characters and heavy symbolism. Especially one piece that I found most interesting of a boy sitting underneath a giant mushroom, because it existed as both a sculpture as well as a painting. According to some online sources Li Jikai is a member of the Ego Generation – a group of Chinese artists born after 1970 who deal with personal matters in their work as opposed to cultural ones. However, it doesn’t really matter if he belongs to that movement or not, since his work is so powerful at expressing its intentions that it doesn’t need to be lumped into a group.

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非 Pixel Brush

Hi’s (非) digital paintings are full of juicy pixel brush strokes and texture. They have all the lushness of an oil painting but  minus the chemical smells.

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Woolly Pocket Presents: Andy Goldsworthy

British Artist Andy Goldsworthy is a master of ephemeral work, capturing the beauty of nature and tempering it with the fleeting nature of all organic things. Each one of his works is a collaboration with nature, and with each piece he strives to gain a closer understand of nature through these intimate interactions. Using his hands and “found tools,” Goldsworthy’s work is a celebration of the world outside the buildings that humans spend their lives inside. His photographs capture the sculpture moments after they are complete, afterwards the sculptures live on changing with the wind, rain and elements until it ceases to exist as Goldsworthy shaped it.

Such is the nature of the Woolly Pocket. Woolly Pocket allows the urban dweller to manipulate nature and incorporate plants into formerly inhospitable territory. Woolly Pocket can take over a wall, fence, living room or any structure and make you the sculptor of your surroundings. Our favorite aspect of Woolly Pocket is their Woolly School Gardens project that connect schools looking to start a garden with community members looking to support their efforts. Help kids get their hands dirty by visiting Wolly School Garden and find a school near you to sponsor.

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We Asked Leon Reid IV A Few Questions After His Studio Was Destroyed By Hurricane Sandy

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Last September, we visited Leon Reid IV‘s studio and brought back some photos. Less than a month later, Hurricane Sandy blew through the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast, leaving so many of us devastated. Leon’s studio is located right up against Newtown Creek in Greenpoint. When the storm hit, the creek flooded the studio with nasty, polluted water; damaging equipment, artwork, and the space itself. Slowly but surely, Leon’s working to bring things back together. We recently talked briefly about his rebuilding process and where things are headed going forward. Click past the jump for Leon’s account of the ordeal and some news from his studio. And stop by his booth at the Fountain Art Fair (March 8-10, 68 Lexington Ave.), where he’ll be showing some of the flooded works.

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