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Alexandra Kehayoglou’s Carpets Look Like Lush Pastures and Grasslands

Alexandra Kehayoglou carpet

 Alexandra Kehayoglou

Alexandra Kehayoglou

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Argentinian artist, Alexandra Kehayoglou creates rugs that look like pastures and meadows. The grassland carpet seeks to mimic the appearance of naturally occurring, but fast disappearing Argentinian landscapes.

Kehayoglou grew up around textile artists, her family followed a textile tradition that was developed thousands of years ago in Asia Minor. After graduating with a degree in visual arts, Kehayoglou returned to her roots making carpets as her ancestors did, but with a twist. As varied as the grasslands and natural scenery of South America, the carpets are beautiful representations of natural and cultural heritage.

Carpet weaving is innate knowledge for me. It makes me feel connected to another time. It is a way of building meanings throughout my life and that of my ancestors.

Her creations carry a strong message of sustainability; these carpets are made from wool often found in mounds of leftover fabrics behind factories. (Via DD.AA.)

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Walter Niedemayr And Four Other Artists Who Create Artwork Inspired By Winter

Walter Martin & Paloma Muñoz, Traveler

Walter Martin & Paloma Muñoz, Traveler

Mark Thompson, In My Time of Need

Mark Thompson, In My Time of Need

Walter Niedermayr

Walter Niedermayr

Kim Dorland, Untitled

Kim Dorland, Untitled

There is a special feeling associated with winter, evoked by the likes of The Polar Express, time with friends and family, and adventures in snow-covered nature.  The below artists have all created work that, for me at least, brings to mind that magical winter spirit.

Italian artist Walter Niedemayr’s photographs are winter scenes presenting images of startling beauty.  Upon further study, his works invite contemplation about man’s evolving relationship to the environment.

Though his work is largely about nature and human’s relationship to it, Toronto-based artist Kim Dorland’s phantasmagoric woodland-scapes often have a spiritual feeling about them.  With the right amount of imagination, they evoke the sense of silence and feeling of peace a wintery landscape can inspire.

The miniature worlds created by Walter Martin and his partner, Paloma Muñoz, are surreal little stories encapsulated in a photograph or a snow globe.  Some of the works have a darker feeling to them, possessing a strangeness that inspires a sense of winter wonder—the idea for the work seemingly coming from a bizarre Christmas fairy tale.

Based on memories, Mark Thompson’s paintings are snapshots of times and spaces that became rooted in his mind.   First making a viewer feel an icy chill while imagining herself transplanted into Thompson’s paintings, we then might imagine it being the view while looking out from a cozy cabin, a fire blazing.

Each of these artists carefully constructs a narrative, evoking feelings associated with winter and all its beauty, danger, mystery and magic.

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Ethereal Portraits By Merve Morkoç Showcase Horrific Beauty

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Beauty is a treasured thing in our culture, and Turkish artist Merve Morkoç, aka Lakor mis, turns this ideal on its head. At first glance their paintings are of seemingly young, glowing-skinned models, but a longer gaze reveals that these subjects all have something seriously wrong with them. Coupled with their well-coiffed hair are fantastical disfigurations that you’d see in a horror film. Warped eyelids, caved in faces, and rashes exist on these young women.

Any sort of pleasant response you initially had is probably gone, and the works are like a train wreck that you can’t look away from. The strange details are intriguing, and it speaks to Morkoç’s expert handling of the medium that they are easily able to fool us into thinking something that’s repulsive is actually beautiful. (Via Hi Fructose)

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Skeleton Swimsuit

We all look the same inside.

(Via Culthole)

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Takayuki Hori X-Rays Origami Animals To Highlight Pollution In Japan

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Origami is both impressive in its folded construction as well as its ability to signify the need for change by urging us to look beyond the paper forms. Animals are no doubt the most popular subject, and Japanese artist Takayuki Hori has a twist on the conventional foldings. He crafts these animals to appear as victims of Japan’s urban pollution, and the pieces expose the sad truths of what happens to these creatures. Hori showcases garbage in their insides using X-ray-like detail. If you look closely, you can see tiny bottles and other trash within the stomachs and ribcages.

These works appear in Hori’s exhibition Oritsunagumono (which means “things folded and connected”) which critiques the polluted coastal waterways and the effects they have on its inhabitants. Images are printed onto translucent sheets of paper and later folded into their origami shapes. The result are a ghostly tribute and haunting reminder of our impact on the environment. (Via Fast Co. Design)

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Emily-Jane Robinson

Emily-Jane Robinson’s photography portfolio is filled with interesting and well taken images documenting Emily’s life and friends. Some of the photos walk the thin line of looking like the standard “look what me and all my sexy drunk friends did last weekend” but there are a handful of very strong photographs that capture all the youthful energy of Emily’s life without the usual cliche trappings. I’ve selected 10 of my favorite photos from her  work below.

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Suzanne Heintz Photographs the American Dream With Her Mannequin Family

Suzanne Heintz Suzanne Heintz Suzanne Heintz Suzanne Heintz

Photographer Suzanes Heintz is a self-proclaimed spinster. As a single woman, she got fed up with the bombardment of questions about when she was going to get married. Tired of being pittied, she decided to confront this issue head on. She purchased two mannequins – one male and one female child – and the series Life Once Removed was born. Dressing up and posing with her fake family, she stages witty representations of the American Dream. Ski trips, vacations, and stereotypical romantic moments are all acted out by Heintz, and she sets the scene perfectly. These colorful images feel saturated, in both how they look and the emotional exuberance of the her expression and body language.

Heintz rejects the notion that to be a successful woman means that you have to fulfill a laundry list of achievements, not limited to an education, career, home, family, accomplishment, and enlightenment. In an interview with Feature Shoot, she explains why she created Life Once Removed:

I’m simply trying to get people to open up their minds and quit clinging to antiquated notions of what a successful life looks like. I want people to lighten up on each other and themselves, and embrace their lives for who it has made them, with or without the Mrs., PhD. or Esq. attached.

All of these photographs are shot on location. When Heintz lays her head in mannequin’s husband’s lap while in the park, it’s totally real, and an important aspect to Heintz’s series. She goes on to say:

While I need the public to act as character and context for the actual photo or video, I also need their responses to make the effort a success as an instigator for social change. The reaction can vary from a raised eyebrow with a head turn, to a blast of laughter, to taking their own snapshots while posing with the mannequins. It depends a lot on the location. But most importantly, it stops people in their tracks long enough to ask me what the heck I’m doing. Because the project is so audacious and flat-out funny, it helps me reach the public, and actually get them to let their guard down long enough for me to have a conversation with them. (Via Feature Shoot)

 

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Bas Princen

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Dutch photographer Bas Princen is interested in capturing desolate landscapes throughout the world. Shooting in China, the US, and elsewhere, Princen seeks out areas where man has attempted (and usually failed) to shape a stark and harsh natural environment into a more livable space.

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