Get Social:

You Need Art!

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Women Take To The Streets Wearing Menstrual Blood Stains

537f7659c2ae1861

Fed up with the shame surrounding their periods, the Spanish performance collective Sangre Menstrual took over the public streets in sets of white pants stained with menstrual blood. This performance artwork was politically motivated; as the group writes in their “Manifesto for the Visibility of the Period,” the taboo surrounding menstruation serves to oppress women and reinforce patriarchal systems.

By making a public display of their shedding uterine linings, the group hopes to reclaim the female body and free normal bodily functions from shame and judgement. Since the earliest books of the bible and before, menstruation has been viewed as unclean, and often women have even been kept separate from men during their periods. Sangre Menstrual, whose name literally translates to “menstrual blood,” intends to change all that. In their manifesto, the group of women write, “I stain [my pants], and it doesn’t make me sick. I stain [my pants] and I don’t find it disgusting.”

The implications of Sangre Menstrual’s street performance extend beyond menstruation and into larger debates surrounding reproduction and the female body. Like the feminist artist Barbara Kruger and her legendary print “Your Body Is A Battlefield,” the blood-stained performance aims to present the body as a political act of defiance. The manifesto states, “the visibility of the period [is meant] to increase the visibility of the body, as political space.” Do patriarchal, sexist institutions persist in part because of the repulsion with which we treat menstruation? Is this work of art a groundbreaking innovation or a silly shock tactic? (via BUST)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Guerrero Gallery

gal_works_750_cody.36inx36in.3900.72

With a fabulous inaugural exhibition under his belt, Andres Guerrero prepares to unleash another round of seriously fly to look at pieces tonight @ Guerrero Gallery! Just look at this handsome lineup he’s assembled; Adam Wallacavage, Albert Reyes, Alexis Mackenzie, Andy Diaz Hope, Brian Cooper, Chris Yormick, Cody Hoyt, Cody Hudson (above), Frohawk Two-Feathers, Greg Lamarche, Jacob Whibley, James Hopkins, James Marshall, Jay Howell, Jon Bocksel, KC Ortiz, Kelsey Brookes, Michael Rea, Michael Swaney, Mike Davis, Ryan Jaenke, Scott Anderson, Ted Pushinsky. Preview images below…..

Currently Trending

Pierre et Gilles

So silly, you’ve got to take them seriously. This is definitely a couple steps above Sears family portraits…all glitter and magic.

Currently Trending

Mickael Jou Combines Photography And Dance To Defy Laws Of Gravity And Levitate Through The Air

Mickael Jou - Photography

Jou1

Mickael Jou - Photography

Mickael Jou - Photography

The intensity and electricity in Mickael Jou’s photography can only be matched by his equally immaculate dancing skills. In his series Air Through my Ashes, Jou captures the precise positions of his dance through the lens of a camera. Each movement, leap, and bend is shown being done not on a stage, but through city streets, in breathtaking nature, and even in a grocery store. Jou, now living in Berlin, was trained as a dancer, and started out dancing through the streets of Paris. He got the idea to photograph himself after so many tourists began taking pictures of him as he danced. He then taught himself how to use a camera and turned his dancing into frozen moments in time where he can levitate and defy gravity.

Jou’s dance positions are turned into still statues that pulsate with energy in each photograph. The incredible scenery of the images is almost as breathtaking as Jou’s suspension in mid air. The series has a kind of magic to it that transports the viewer into a world where your feet never need to touch the ground. What makes each composition so dynamic is not only the sheer power felt in the dancer’s stance, but also the addition of a scarf in the dance movements. This scarf that often appears adds color and balance to the rhythm of each photograph as it floats alongside this multi-talented dancer. Jou combines these two art forms harmoniously to create ethereal and graceful photographs. He explains how using these two mediums further his creative vision and expression:

My self-portraits help me express the emotions that I feel while dancing. Dance is a very powerful art form, and I try to translate my emotions into my photography.

Currently Trending

Brian Vu’s ‘No Bad Days’ series

 

Brian Vu’s latest collage series, No Bad Days, cleverly juxtaposes religious iconography with skyscapes to shield the identity of its subjects. Stunning!

Currently Trending

Pejac’s Trompe L’oeil Street Art Will Fool You Into Opening That Door

pejac-9 street art street art street art

Street artist Pejac uses trompe l’oeil to fool our eye in everyday places. The Spanish creative paints realistic-looking doors and windows that’ll make you do a double take while walking by. His skilled artworks perfectly blend colors and textures to give them the appearance that you could reach out and touch them.

In addition to the optical illusions, Pejac also paints playful and serious scenes, often using silhouetted figures. A young girl – a giant – uses the power of a magnifying glass and the sun to set tiny figures on fire. Another person attempts to deface a wall, but the splatter features Manet’s iconic The Luncheon on the Grass. And, in a more poignant piece, a portrait of the world appears to run down a sewage drain.

The common thread of Pejac’s work is that it is all clever – in its execution and concept. Even though the imagery is disparate, you can tell it’s his signature. (via WETHEURBAN)

Currently Trending

Anne Wölk

German artist Anne Wölk uses film stills as her main source of inspiration for these surreal paintings that are in a permanent state of flux.

Currently Trending