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A Museum Of Broken Relationships

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These photographs are images of a unique museum collection.  The Museum of Broken Relationships originally began as a project in Croatia by Zagreb based artists Olinka Vištica and Dražen Grubišić now tours internationally.  While many may destroy the painful mementos of a failed relationship, the museum seeks to transform the impulse into a creative one.  The museum points out other rituals such as funerals, marriages, and even graduation farewells while break-up do not have a formal ceremony.  In a way the museum offers one to assist with the emotional impact of an ended reltionship.  For this reason, the museum encourages people to donate personal belongings to be exhibited as “their love legacy as a sort of a ritual, a solemn ceremony.”

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Paul Ward Photographs The Scream

It seems talent is coming at a younger age these days. At only 22 years old South Afcrian Paul Ward is a photographer to watch and follow with more work in his portfolio than most seasoned vets. His series of people simply looking at the camera and screaming is simple yet breathtaking group of images. Scream with Paul Ward and friends after the jump.

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Lisa Park’s Brainwaves Used To Create Performance Art

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Eunoia from Lisa Park on Vimeo.

Artist Lisa Park‘s performance titled Euonia – a Greek word that can be translated as “beautiful thinking”.  The title is apt as Park’s thought’s are central the beauty of her performance.  She makes use of an EEG headset which monitors various brainwaves and eye movement.  The resulting information is translated into sound directed to one of five speakers.  A shallow pan of water sits on each speaker, vibrating and shimmering with each of Park’s various thoughts.  Park associated each of the five speakers with a different emotion and would recall various memories of people important to her in order to manipulate the speakers.  She had hoped to develop the ability, through practice, to end her performance in silence but could not – an outcome perhaps more interesting than she had intended.  It may be the brain is much more difficult to quiet than it seems.  Be sure to check out the video to see Lisa Park’s brain in action.  [via]

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Nicola Samorì Corrupts Art History

Nicola Samorì makes seductive, profound paintings by layering and fusing images on canvas, wood or copper and then obliterating them by scratching, erasing, fingering and painting over the surfaces multiple times. By violating the golden rule of all museums (“Please do not touch the artwork.”) Samorìis making art history by corrupting his own work and imposing a new Samorì on top. The resulting layers of paint create a new skin that bears the bruises and permanent marks of all prior creative efforts.
Selecting portraits and still life’s from classical paintings but also sourcing random faces and images from the Web, Samorì is engaged in a project about time and corrosion.

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Sonny Smith 100 Records

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I believe we were at Adobe Books on 16th Street in San Francisco when Sonny Smith first told me about his ambitious project 100 Records. It was one of many conversations Sonny was having with other artists; simply asking them if they would make artwork for the record cover of a fictitious band. The exhibit opened a few weeks ago at Gallery 16 and instead of writing more about the project, I would invite you to read Victoria Gannon’s review on Art Practical. I would also suggest that you watch KQED‘s feature with words from Sonny Smith himself. Exhibition closes May 28th. Will travel to other cities this Summer/Fall. Enjoy more images after the jump…

*All images courtesy of Gallery 16 San Francisco

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Adeline Mai Explores Profound Intimacy Inn Her Breathtaking Nudes

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Like looking into the private thoughts of a diary, photographer Adeline Mai creates narratives of intimacy, portraying poetic scenes of human interaction.  In her body of work, she creates ethereal images of profound closeness between her subjects.  With titles like J’ai Embrassé L’Aube D’Été, French for I Embraced the Summer Dawn, Weightlessness, and Dirty Weekend, the names of each series are just as lyrical as the photographs itself. The Parisian artist captures stunning images of contorting bodies, displaying breathtaking views of the human body. In her series I Embraced the Summer Dawn, each photograph contains a stark emptiness except for the two, nude figures beautifully entwined as if they are attempting to become one body. This same sense of intimacy is embodied in her series Dirty Weekend. Only instead of gracefully posed, flawless bodies, we are now given a view of a more natural nudity, out in the woods and in more candid positions. Mai not only captures a playful kind of nakedness, but a shared closeness between clothed subjects as well.  She is a master at capturing tender moments between her subjects and laying them out for all to see.

Mai having the ability to brilliantly capture light on her subjects, her series Weightlessness includes floating figures with soft, warm light consuming their surroundings. These figures appear to be floating, but they are actually underwater! The photographer has turned this normally cool-colored environment into a glow of yellows, reds, and oranges. Adeline Mai’s entrancing photography pulls you in to its intimate scenes of magnificent nudes being swallowed up by a sea of color or by human embrace.

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Branded: Michael Murphy Creates A Floating Human Portrait Out Of 100 Laser-Cut Logos

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Michael Murphy is a Brooklyn-based artist known for his perception-challenging sculptural installations. Featured here is a new work titled “Branded,” commissioned by the Manhattan creative consultancy Lippincott. In an exploration of the term “brand identity,” Murphy used 100 laser-cut images of graphic logos to create a human face—more specifically, the face of his daughter, Iris Isadora. Portions of her photo where printed across each logo. From a distance, the image appears complete; move closer, however, and the portions break apart into distinct logos—Starbucks, Instagram, and KFC among them. Watch the video above and see how the installation changes form depending on one’s vantage point.

Lippincott believes that a company’s brand represents not only an identity, but a possibility; “it is who you are and who you aspire to be” (Source). By constructing a human face out of logos, Murphy’s work intends to represent how brands themselves can function similar to living entities, changing and growing along with the cultural trends. The fact that perspective changes the form and cohesion of the installation suggests that one’s own experience of a brand can function within a subjective framework.

In addition to Lippincott, Murphy’s other clientele have included TIME Magazine, Washington Life, and Art for Obama. For the past two years he has been collaborating with Michael Jordan and Nike in the creation of retail centerpieces for the Jordan Brand. View Murphy’s website to learn more. Isadora is a musician whose work can be heard here.

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Dynamic Artists Join Forces To Create A Hybrid Series Of Disfigured Faces

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When two great artists come together with completely different styles, amazing things can happen. Artists Grady Gordon and Derek Albeck have come together to create a collaborative series in which Gordon starts one of their artworks, and Albeck will finish it. Both artists working in graphite, their work fits together naturally. However, there solo work provides a stark contrast to each other’s styles. Gordon often works in monotype, creating his pigment from ground up cow bones. His organic, abstract techniques could not be more different than his collaborator. Albeck’s work is exceptionally detailed, rendering photorealistic drawings with graphite. When you mix these two opposite methods of creating art together, the results are incredibly unique.

When Gordan and Albeck join forces, their work becomes a hybrid series of morphing, deformed faces that are not of this world. These highly expressive faces are missing many parts such as eyes, a nose, or a mouth at some times. Even the hand that is included in this series appears to have contorting fingers and twisted bones. The winding line work confuses our perception until we cannot tell which end is which, or even, which part is the inside or the outside of the head. You can see this captivating series at the exhibition Sometimes I See You Look At Me Like That at The Smoking Nun Gallery in San Francisco, Califonrnia. You don’t want to miss it, as it ends next month on July 17th.

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