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A Temple Of Love Built Out Of Neon Colors, Geometric Patterns And Bold Typography

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If the Beatles were right and all you need is love, I’ll take Morag Myerscough and Luke Morgan’s version thank you very much. Built for the Festival of Love held in Southbank Centre, London (June 28 – August 31, 2014), The Temple of Agape is a visual feast. Neon colors, geometric patterns, and bold typography combine to make love a vibrant, exciting place to be.

The structures are inspired by those encountered by Myerscough in India and elsewhere in Asia where bamboo is used extensively for scaffolding as well as the Watts Towers in LA. The vibrant colours and handpainted lettering are similarly inspired.

Much of the success of the design is due to the restraint shown by Myerscough and Morgan, which may seem counterintuitive when looking at the riotous structure. Look closer, though, and you’ll see that there is one typeface and one type treatment. The color palette is strictly controlled, a neon rainbow, plus pink, black, and white. All of the shapes are simple and geometric; even the counters of the letters are removed, streamlining the shapes of the letters. Minimizing the design elements allows the installation to be ebullient but not overwhelming.

The Festival celebrates the legalization of Same Sex Couple Act by choosing seven Greek words describing love. Myerscough and Morgan’s were given Agape, a spiritual, selfless love; the love of humanity. Their temple represents the power of love to conquer hate.

“The Temple stands proud like a peacock with its giant Martin Luther King quote, expressing the power of love to the world,” say Myerscough and Morgan. “Inside its heart is calm and dappled with light for contemplating complex emotions, a place that can transform with Love expressed within.”

This is a temporary construction, which is a shame. The world could use more love, especially when it’s executed so beautifully. (Via Creative Review) Photos by Gareth Gardner.

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A Day In Decay: Mammoth Signs

For the last 4 years I’ve made a pilgrimage to Mammoth Lakes for the holidays to get a break from work and get some quality snowboarding in on one of the best mountains in the world. I didn’t do much work during my trip but lucky for you I managed to photograph a handful of vintage signs that can be found in tiny towns between Los Angeles and Mammoth. I’m not sure what it is but these old signs have a certain character that you just don’t see in signage these days. Here are a few of my favorites.

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Renzo Razzetto

The illustrations of a free spirit and a wandering mind. How refreshing. In lieu of the “carnal” nature of these plates, I have to say “well done”! Is that “Cheesy”?
Its “refreshing” to see art on such a cathartic level executed beyond stick figures scratched on a notebook. “Cheers”!

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Tetsuya Ishida

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Like clues in a crime scene, Tetsuya Ishida’s paintings use a million tiny details to tell their story. The note on the table, the eerie playtime carnage–Ishida’s work often speaks of the uncertain union between Man and Machine. But I think the most unsettling thing about his paintings is that the human figures’ reactions range only from complacency to mild concern, as if I re-enacted deadly car accidents with my toys on a daily basis. In a tragic act of irony, Ishida himself was hit and killed by a train in 2005.

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Government, Conspiracy and Art Converge at SMoCA In COVERT OPERATIONS

Ahmed Basiony, 30 Days of Running in the Place (still), 2010/2011. Two-channel color digital video installation with two-channel soundtrack; run time and dimensions variable. Footage from the 2010 performance of 30 Days of Running in the Place and the 2011 Tahrir Square protests, edited by Shady El Noshokaty. Courtesy of the Basiony Estate. © Basiony Estate

Ahmed Basiony, 30 Days of Running in the Place (still), 2010/2011. Two-channel color digital video installation with two-channel soundtrack; run time and dimensions variable. Footage from the 2010 performance of 30 Days of Running in the Place and the 2011 Tahrir Square protests, edited by Shady El Noshokaty. Courtesy of the Basiony Estate. © Basiony Estate

Jenny Holzer, Ribs, 2010. Eleven LED signs with blue, red and white diodes, text: US government documents, 58 1/4 x 5 1/4 x 5 3/4 inches each. Courtesy of the artist and Cheim & Read, New York. © 2010 Jenny Holzer, member Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Richard-Max Tremblay

Jenny Holzer, Ribs, 2010. Eleven LED signs with blue, red and white diodes, text: US government documents, 58 1/4 x 5 1/4 x 5 3/4 inches each. Courtesy of the artist and Cheim & Read, New York. © 2010 Jenny Holzer, member Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Richard-Max Tremblay

Trevor Paglen, Untitled (Reaper Drone), 2010. Chromogenic print, 48 x 60 inches. Courtesy the artist and Altman Siegel, San Francisco; Metro Pictures, New York; and Galerie Thomas Zander, Cologne. © Trevor Paglen

Trevor Paglen, Untitled (Reaper Drone), 2010. Chromogenic print, 48 x 60 inches. Courtesy the artist and Altman Siegel, San Francisco; Metro Pictures, New York; and Galerie Thomas Zander, Cologne. © Trevor Paglen

Covert Operations: Investigating the Known Unknowns, curated by Claire C. Carter, recently opened at Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art (SMoCA), occupying the museum’s four exhibition spaces with intense focus.  Encompassing digital media works, large scale photography and interactive installations, the exhibition questions what we know and what we think we know.

SMoCA writes: “Covert Operations: Investigating the Known Unknowns is the first major survey of a generation of artists working in the violent and uncertain decade following the 9/11 terrorist attacks to collect and reveal previously unreported or under-reported information. This group of international artists includes Ahmed Basiony, Thomas Demand, Hasan Elahi, Harun Farocki, Jenny Holzer, Trevor Paglen and Taryn Simon. They use legal procedures as well as traditional research methods and resources such as the Freedom of Information Act, government archives, field research and insider connections. The thirty-seven artworks included in Covert Operations employ the tools of democracy to bear witness to attacks on liberty and to embrace democratic ideals, open government and civil rights.

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Lucas Soi

lucas soiLucas Soi is a Canadian artist living and working in Vancouver, B.C. His interdisciplinary
practice involves work on paper, installation and video.

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Gallery Tour – Blum & Poe

Keith Tyson

I may be a little late on the band-wagon, but I couldn’t not post about Keith Tyson’s solo exhibition at the Blum & Poe gallery, it’s way too good. The buildings large brick structure and Tyson’s sizable work are the perfect combination. The height and natural lighting in the gallery space is awe-inspiring.

This exhibition includes three bodies of Tysons work: Nature Paintings, Operator Paintings and Studio Wall Drawings. All three projects explore the “paradoxes about the nature of being” and touch upon the overwhelming link between humans and the complex systems that are constantly surrounding us. My personal favorite is Tyson’s Operator Paintings. For this project he utilizes mathematical theories and cosmological systems as a basis for his illustration, calling attention to the limitations and differences between two disparate forms of communication: math and art.

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The Sensual World

"The Sensual Presidents of the United States (1984)" by Eric Timothy Carlson. He took a presidential calendar and replaced all their faces with roses.


Here are some pictures that I took from the Synch Space opening two Saturdays ago to cobble together a follow up post albeit, ahem, very tardy (the show closed this past Saturday). It was really hilarious and awesome to see so many different interpretations of Kate Bush’s image and persona. Though, to tell you the truth, I don’t know too much about her and read up only about her the day before the opening (yikes!). I hope you won’t judge me on that admission tooo much.

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