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Chun Kwang Young’s Intricate Topographical Sculptures Crafted With Newspaper, Each Telling Its Own Endless Story

Chun Kwang Young- Newspaper SculptureChun Kwang Young- Newspaper Sculpture Chun Kwang Young- Newspaper Sculpture Chun Kwang Young- Newspaper Sculpture

Korean artist Chun Kwang Young began sculpting when he came to New York as a means to processing what he witnessed as a materialistic society ceaselessly searching for “more.” Using newspapers, which he folds into small prisms, these sculptures form as a compilation of our verbal recording of history, opinion, and discovery. Figuratively, the sculptures emerge like topographical maps of rocky landscapes, or planetary surfaces. Points and crags describing a rocky terrain that is nearly unnavigable. Metaphorically, this work is a culmination of the floating lexicon of our time; the ongoing conversation of man compiled in a three dimensional format, echoing the voices that pass each day through our print media. Each figure is a time capsule of pieced data and voice. Although the sculptures themselves are mute, each has a strong story to tell. As Young describes his work:

“Every piece of information is the end product of a struggle for hegemony, as well as an accumulation of human experience. One hypothesis ceaselessly conflicts with another, and finally becomes a new knowledge. While these kinds of processes are sometimes made in a peaceful way through debates and publications, they sometimes happen in the shape of physical conflicts like wars led by the governing class.”

His work is a symbolic expression of how words form into actions and become words again- a speech becomes a call to action, which becomes a war, which is then recounted through story. Everything seamless weaves into itself, a cyclical timeline we hardly noticed as we are so permanently bound to it. (Excerpt from Source)

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Satan’s Mask

Satan as a headless-masquerade holding ghost on an abandoned island floating in the deep, dark void of space creating life from clay and striking them down, all in front of tiny children. Yes! Amazing excerpt from a stop motion version of Mark Twain’s Mysterious Stranger, by Will Vinton. Censored from many TV stations. Yes!

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Montreal’s Cœur de Pirate Makes Her LA Debut

Cœur de Pirate

“I heard my song at Whole Foods like a half an hour ago… this is weird”, said Montreal’s Cœur de Pirate, aka Béatrice Martin who performed this past weekend in LA at the El Rey Theatre in front of a very enthusiastic crowd. At only 23 years old, she already has two award winning LP’s under her belt and three new nominations from the ADISQ (Association québécoise de l’industrie du disque, du spectacle et de la vidéo) this year, and she was invited to perform at the Francofolies first American event, A Tribute to Édith Piaf at New York’s Beacon Theatre tonight. I was more than happy that the busy young singer/songwriter graciously sat down with me to chat before her LA debut.

“It’s my first California tour, I did Portland and Sasquatch about a year ago when I was still pregnant so that was intense”.  “I wasn’t expecting such a turn out” she says about her show at San Francisco’s Great American Music Hall the night before. “I thought 3 people were gonna show up… it was packed… people that don’t know French and they’re just singing… it was really nice so I’m excited about tonight”.

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Cayce Zavaglia’s Incredibly Real Embroidered Portraits That Look Like Paint


American artist Cayce Zavaglia considers herself a painter.  “Although the medium employed is crewel embroidery wool, the technique borrows more from the worlds of drawing and painting”, the artist comments on her statement.

Manipulating color, especially paint with a brush, is obviously easier than manipulating color with varying wool strings and needles. That seems kind of impossible, don’t you think? Zavaglia makes it looks like a seamless process, laborious but not too difficult to actually achieve.

“Initially, working with an established range of wool colors proved frustrating.”

Painterly portraits demand for loose brushstrokes and intermingling colors, varying tones, and contrasting hues; creating a technique that would allow her to do this with wool strings was something that Zavaglia struggled with. However, with time, she came up with a system of sewing the threads in a sequence that would ultimately give the allusion of a certain color or tone. The system allowed for the threads to mimic the depth,volume, and form that we are familiar with in paintings and color drawings.

My work unabashedly nods its head to the tradition of tapestry and my own love of craft. Using wool instead of oils has allowed me to broaden the dialogue between portrait and process as well as propose a new definition for the word “painting”.

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Artist Interview: Jeremiah Maddock

Jeremiah Maddock is a hard guy to pin down. Many have spoken of him as some sort of ghost- a shadowy figure that passes through bars and cafes with a suitcase full of muted drawings, and an unknown past. This legend surrounding the artist, who lives -most of the time- in New York City, creating richly patterned mixed media works populated with ghoulish creatures and tramps, is likely a product of his obvious lack of desire for external validation. It’s clear that Maddock, who has no personal website, maintains a very pure process; he is interested more in the act of creating -and the motivations behind such an act- than any finished product.

I caught up with Jeremiah in-between his extensive travels throughout the interior of the country. Read the interview after the jump, which includes the artist’s thoughts on steez-biting Mayans, art fairs with Josh Keyes in high school, and collaborating with the dead.

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Mathew Borrett’s Maze-Like Drawings Of Secret Rooms

Mathew Borrett’s intensely detailed drawings of maze-like rooms and secret compartments that seem to never end are mysterious puzzles that fade into the nothingness of the stark white paper that they are drawn on.

“From a very early age I used to have frequent dreams about finding hidden rooms between rooms in my house. Usually some facet of my fears or desires would be present in these rooms. As a Lego fanatic, I’d often find fantastic new Lego sets I didn’t know existed (which made waking up a disappointment). Later we moved into an old farmhouse with lots of nooks and crannies and a basement that often flooded. It underwent a lot of renovation over the 17 years we lived there, and I was always fascinated when a wall was removed or temporarily breached and you could pass from one room to another in a new way. The scope of the dreams expanded to include strange gaps and holes and secret shafts that dropped away into spooky abysses. Sometimes I’d explore basements beneath the basement, or attics beyond the attic. I think I’ve probably explored a thousand different dream versions of that old house.”

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Douglas Kelley Show: Barnaby Whitfield Interview

B/D has been a fan of Barnaby Whitfield’s work since we featured him way back in issue X. We’re totally in love with his beautifully rendered and grotesquely exquisite pastels but were surprised to find that he is dabbling in the world of performance. Watch Barnaby’s performance as well as a informal roundtable discussion about the performance and his work in this video for the Douglas Kelley Show. Keep up the good work Barnaby!

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…You Is Fine!

We all know that Valentines day is a scam created by greedy corporations looking for an excuse to make an extra buck. However I have to admit that this is one valentines day gift I wouldn’t mind getting behind. I introduce to you the Love Is Lame series of teddy bears by NYC based designer Chad Silver. What started as an art school project has turned into a full fledged company that helps you say those  five affectionate words to your loved one.

Via Refinery 29

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