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The Living Landscapes of Siobhan McBride

 

Landscapes are alive in the paintings of Siobhan McBride.  Different locations mesh into a single scene.  Memories and colors delicately surface in the foreground.  McBride’s paintings aren’t so much surreal scenes as they are subtly collaged images in paint.  Speaking of her work McBride says:

“I have come to think of my paintings as views of a place where magic reveals itself differently than it does in this world. The scenes are tense with anticipation or blushing in the aftermath of an unseen event. Paintings combine disparate yet familiar fragments into spaces that are still, anxious, and temperamental.”

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Masao Kinoshita’s Powerful Sculptures Are Skinned To Reveal Hulking Muscles

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With rippling, coiled muscles, the sculptures of Masao Kinoshita stand skinned and erect. Working with materials ranging from wood to resin to bronze, the Japanese sculptor uses an aesthetic we normally associate with natural history museums to render athletic, flexing creatures of the sea and land. Save for their multiple heads and engorged limbs, these beasts could easily be ancestors of man.

Kinoshita draws much of his inspiration from diverse mythologies, religions and folklores from around the globe. Fusing narratives across space and time, the horned maenads of ancient Greece live alongside the Yoga Asura deities of Buddhism in a visceral, animalistic universe where fitness reigns supreme. The Hindu god Ganesh poses confidently while a human baby and a small teddy bear develop muscles of similar size and strength.

Given the artist’s knowledge of folklore and spiritual histories, we might interpret his massive, hulking walrus as a nod to the beast mentioned in Alice in Wonderland, who is widely assumed to represent the Buddha. Built from wood, he would certainly seem at home in the story of “The Walrus and the Carpenter,” but his soulful eyes maintain a divine dignity that eluded Lewis Carroll’s infamous character.

Throughout Kinoshita’s impressive body of work, the physical and the metaphysical are allowed to coexist. Where modern religions condemn the pleasures of the body and exalt in those of the spirit, these sculptures present a world wherein the gods themselves are proud—even arrogant, as the case may be with those thong-wearing bodybuilders—to live within mortal anatomies. Take a look. (via HiFructose)

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LED Light Tubes That Seem To Never End

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The artwork of Hans Kotter is decidedly centered around light.  Here Kotter creates tubes of lights that appear to stretch on infinitely into the wall.  He uses color changing LED lights that shine behind a warped one way mirror.  The backing mirror then duplicates the LED lights infinitely.  Kotter’s piece are continually changing as the color of the lights gradually shift and as the viewer moves about the room.  Though technically constructed from Plexiglas, mirrors, and diodes, it is really the light endlessly bouncing between the mirrors that compose Kotter’s work.

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Mark Khaisman’s Film Noir ‘Drawings’ Made With Packing Tape And Lightboxes

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In the past, artist Mark Khaisman has used his signature style of translucent packing tape, acrylic paint/film panels and lightboxes to create an extension of drawing which focused on decorative objects (such as rugs, chairs and fabric patterns), luxury items (handbags) and portraiture (previously here). For his most recent series, Stills, the Ukranian-born, Philadephia-based Khaisman channels Hollywood’s Classic Era and Film Noir into layers of tape, hand-rolled and variously removed so the light shining through each image creates lines, texture and shading.

Although Khaisman freely sources images from a shared historical film lexicon, his work also takes on a thoroughly modern, almost pixelated feel and reference, particularly in his more colorful works. Says the artist of his signature process,

“The tape is the message. A parody on Marshall McLuhan’s famous quote could explain the superficial motives, which make up the work. Subjects are categorized into different groups: fragmented stills from classic cinema, iconic objects from art history, portraits. The works are exploring the familiar as our shared visual history; made of a familiar material formed into a familiar image, asking the viewer to recognize and complete the work, stimulating both memory and interpretation in the process.” 

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Amanda Boe’s Poetic Photos Of The In-Between

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Reveling in the small, quiet corners of everyday life, Bay Area photographer Amanda Boe explores themes of isolation, curiosity and mise-en-scene in her strange, stunning work. When looking through images from her series Here and There, it’s easy to let your mind wander into each frame, gently prompted to think about time, place, and what it feels like to be “passing through.” The crisp simplicity of her work is charged with her natural sensibilities as a curious, highly-engaged observer—collecting visual treats as she moves through the world. Boe investigates the places in-between the larger moments of life, and reports back with work that is meditative, personal and poetic.

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Amazing Waves – Sine Wave Animation by Daniel Sierra

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Oscillate is the MFA thesis project of digital artist Daniel Sierra.  The animation begins with a simple rolling sine wave.  However, things quickly get complex.  The waves fling dust, begin to smoke, and seem to catch fire.  The waves multiply and mutate.  Oscillate is an impressive animation by any standard, especially considering it is a school project (albeit an MFA thesis project).  Also, you’ll notice the credits are especially short.  While such animations typically have a staff of several, Sierra animated and composed the music entirely on his own.  [via]

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Daniel Eatock’s Common Object Sculptures

By stacking two otherwise banal objects and calling it art, Daniel Eatock‘s sculptures both make us laugh as well as re-view the objects around us as first and foremost formal objects and secondly as things we can use to, say, move a pile of dirt around. Try it! Look at all those little smooth squares your fingers are pushing. Look around you!

In his words ” […] I propose systems, templates, invitations and opportunities for collaboration, creating social networks where contributers shape the outcome and participate in the building of works. I embrace contradictions, and dilemmas. I like gray areas, oxymorons and the feeling of falling backwards. My favorite colour is the purple found in a soap bubble. I prefer to swap and exchange things rather than use money. I seek alignments, paradoxes, chance circumstance, loops, impossibilities and wit encountered in everyday life. I often change my mind, go full circle, and arrive at the beginning.” – Daniel Eatock

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Phil Hansen Overcomes Career-Ending Injury To Make Amazing Work

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Daudi, graphite on cups.  Work made for under $1

Daudi, graphite on cups. Work made for under $1

During his time in art school Phil Hansen developed a shake in his hand.  Interested in pointillism, a technique that involves many many small dots to make up an image, Hansen’s intense attention to detail exacerbated the only made the shake worse.  The problem led him to abandon art for some time.  But missing his calling, Hansen decided to seek an expert’s advice.  A neurologist told him he had permanent nerve damage and would never fully recover.  Deciding to “embrace the shake,” Hansen returned to art using a different approach.  Hansen realized that, “we have to first be limited, to become limitless.”  A creative through and through, Hansen developed projects whereby he would give himself a “limit,” and then figure out how to overcome it.  Deciding to make a work within certain parameters, Hansen came up with ideas such as creating a work of art for under $1, or a work made up of “karate chops,” or work made out of impermanent materials.  Challenging himself and the limits (non-limits) of his creativity, Hansen enjoys the process and channels his ideas into these various projects.

Inspiring by deciding to be inspired by his restrictions, Hansen landed a TED talk (see above).  His current project is a unique collaboration with the Rockefeller Foundation.  Hansen is creating art out of individual stories of philanthropy.  You can still submit a story, or read others here.

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