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Kimberly Clark’s Severed Head

Artist collective Kimberly Clark present the hedonistic but also deeply disturbing image of an exaggerated nightlife, on the borderline of excess. Scenes from parties, static images or movements in suspension and representations of blissfulness, provocation, glamour, desolation, boredom, stimulation, the concentrated remains of a nightlong euphoria jumbled together with cosmetics (empty Marlboro packets, bottles and cans of beer, lipstick, etc), compose a kind of group portrait (or self-portrait?) with explicit signs of psychological fluctuation. At the centre is always the female figure, trendy attractive, narcissistic and, at the same time, a live-size simulacrum, juxtaposing stereotypes of the female identity with shocking views of the night and mounds of consumer rubbish.-Thanos Stathopoulos

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Adam Tullie

I am really enjoying Los Angeles-based artist Adam Tullie’s recent portfolio of drawings. He uses painstakingly intricate mark-making to create simple shapes, hinting at tribal masks. Adam Tullie recently featured his work in San Francisco, I may just have a friend of mine over there pick up a few of his show’s postcards for my wall.

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Barry Underwood’s Light Art Installations

Barry Underwood’s images are documentations of full-scale installations that are built on-site in the landscape. Using illusion, imagination, and narrative, his photographs explore the potential of the ordinary. Approaching his photographs with a theatrical sensibility, much like a cinematographer or set designer would. By reading the landscape and altering the vista through lights and photographic effects, he transform everyday scenes into unique images. Light and color alter the perception of space, while defamiliarizing common objects. Space collapses, while the lights that he installs appear as intrusions and interventions. This combination renders the forms in the landscape abstract. Inspired by cinema, land art, and contemporary painting, the resulting photographs are both surreal and familiar. They suggest a larger narrative, and yet that narrative remains elusive and mystifying.

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Last Day To Save On Our Mega Mystery Sale!

Today is the very last day to take advantage of our big Mystery Pack sale. We’re slashing our already discounted Mystery Packs for both magazines and t-shirts. This is your chance to save a bundle of cash, get a killer surprise package in the mail, and have fun all at once. It’s like Beautiful/Decay throwing you a surprise party and giving you the best gift ever! Sale ends tonight at Midnight PST

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Lucas Soi

lucas soiLucas Soi is a Canadian artist living and working in Vancouver, B.C. His interdisciplinary
practice involves work on paper, installation and video.

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Killer Heels Exhibit Shows 400 Years Of High Heel Evolution

Chau Har Lee. “Blade Heel,” 2010. Perspex, stainless steel, leather. Courtesy of Chau Har Lee. Photo: Jay Zukerkorn

Chau Har Lee. “Blade Heel,” 2010. Perspex, stainless steel, leather. Courtesy of Chau Har Lee. Photo: Jay Zukerkorn

Noritaka Tatehana. “Atom,” 2012–13. Faux leather. Courtesy of Noritaka Tatehana. Photo: Jay Zukerkorn

Noritaka Tatehana. “Atom,” 2012–13. Faux leather. Courtesy of Noritaka Tatehana. Photo: Jay Zukerkorn

Winde Rienstra. “Bamboo Heel,” 2012. Bamboo, glue, plastic cable ties. Courtesy of Winde Rienstra. Photo: Jay Zukerkorn

Winde Rienstra. “Bamboo Heel,” 2012. Bamboo, glue, plastic cable ties. Courtesy of Winde Rienstra. Photo: Jay Zukerkorn

Iris van Herpen X United Nude. “Beyond Wilderness,” 2013. Courtesy of United Nude. Photo: Jay Zukerkorn

Iris van Herpen X United Nude. “Beyond Wilderness,” 2013. Courtesy of United Nude. Photo: Jay Zukerkorn

Killer Heels,” a new exhibit at the Brooklyn Museum, traverses the decades from the 17th century up to now, displaying iconic shoes such as Marilyn Monroe’s stilettos alongside modern 3D-printed heels by designer Iris van Herpen. Needless to say, these heels put the “haute” in “haute couture,” one of them featuring 8-inch stilettos that forces the wearer on her toes. Another, a pair of Manchu platform shoes, look almost like jeweled music boxes set on pedestals.

Over the years, high heels have become a complex and controversial symbol, by turns fetishized and reviled. To explore this complexity, the 160 pairs in the exhibit are diverse. On the classical end of the spectrum, French shoes from the late 17th century are modest, with muted colors and crafted from silk and leather. Some heels are more whimsical, like the bright red “Eamz” by Rem D. Koolhaas, which brings to mind the plush vinyl of stools at a soda fountain. The Block Heel from Balenciaga strikes a more classic pose, looking infinitely wearable next to the elegant but tortured lines of Walter Steiger’s “Unicorn Tayss.”

According to Lisa Small, who organized and curated the exhibit, the heels are “difficult aesthetically or meant to be making different kinds of statements rather than the prototypical sexy stiletto.”

Killer Heels elevates the high heel to something more than an accessory. Museum-goers will contemplate its cultural identity, form, and function. They will marvel at the various incarnations from pump to peeptoe. And, upon leaving the exhibit, they will breathe a sigh of relief and thank the powers that be for the invention of the humble sneaker.

The exhibit will be on display until February 15, 2015. Visit the Brooklyn Museum online for directions and details regarding admission and museum hours.

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Roger Kelly

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In the year 2237, after we’ve all been forced to move to the Moon, we will keep warm with these post-apocalyptic future quilts. That is, of course, assuming rumors are proven false and the moon isn’t really the Death Star. Anyway, thats my take on London based artist Roger Kelly’s work. His pieces are not just a random collection of abstract shapes, but on close inspection, fragments of buildings, rocks, and trees all stitched together to create Kelly’s overwhelming vision.

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Mary Ellen Mark & Julie de Waroquier: Two Photographers who Capture Twins

Mary Ellen Mark, Heather and Kelsey Dietrick, 7 years old, Kelsey older by 66 minutes

Mary Ellen Mark, Heather and Kelsey Dietrick, 7 years old, Kelsey older by 66 minutes

Mary Ellen Mark, Ned and Fred Mitchell, 50 years old, Ned older by 30 seconds

Mary Ellen Mark, Ned and Fred Mitchell, 50 years old, Ned older by 30 seconds

Julie de Waroquier

Julie de Waroquier

 

Julie de Waroquier

Julie de Waroquier

Twins: an almost illogically impossible phenomenon where two people look exactly, or almost exactly, alike.  Stories of the bonds twins share are equally as fascinating; experiencing the same thoughts and dreams, or switching places to help one another out.  It’s no wonder that both Mary Ellen Mark and Julie de Waroquier were drawn to them as the subject matter for their photographs.

Mary Ellen Mark is a well-known photographer based in New York.  Considering herself both a documentary and a portrait photographer, Mark was drawn to twins as a unique subject of fascination over a long period of time.  She first travelled to the Twins Days Festival in Twinsburg, Ohio in 1998.  Enamored with the idea of making a full body of work on twins, Mark contacted the Festival in 2001 to arrange to do a documentary and portrait project there.  Over two years she captured portraits and interviewed her subjects, ending up with over a thousand pages of transcripts.  The photos themselves, created with the 20×24 poloroid, are stunning black and white images full of narrative and personality.

Julie de Waroquier is a French photographer and philosopher.  Her twin series is titled “Chimeras.”  Of it she wrote:

“twins have always fascinated me, and not only because I have a twin brother: they are almost magic, and yet they are real.  Indeed, the fact that two people look exactly the same whereas they are not the same person is astonishing.  It is like a real dream, or like a miracle.  In some past or present civilizations, twins are even considered as gods…or as monsters.”

Capturing her chimeras in dreamy landscapes, de Waroquier’s images take on a kind of mythical feeling of their own, furthering the sense that the existence of twins is both mysterious and special.

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