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Marvelous Tiny Worlds Made Inside Toilet Paper Rolls

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For her project Rouleaux, the French multimedia artist Annastassia Elias builds tiny world within single toilet paper rolls. Lit from behind, her delightful cardboard scenes appear like stills from a mysterious work of shadow puppetry. Here, the roll, most commonly a piece of trash associated with the mundane rituals of domestic life, becomes elevated to the realm of high art. Elias’s visual narratives span time and space; as surely as summer swings fade to frigid snowmen, we move from an underwater universe to the barber shop around the corner.

Caught between the circular borders of the toilet paper roll, Elias’s characters seem to emerge from the cardboard of their own volition. Each racehorse and dinosaur is constructed from cut pieces of paper that share their color with the naked roll itself. The artist chooses not to paint either the rolls or the scenes that emerge from within them, allowing the textured, sand-hued paper to maintain a uniform circularity; ultimately, each tiny world appears to be eternally collapsing into itself. Horses run in circles, and a weary man and his donkey, who lowers his head in exhaustion, appear to trudge forward down a path that will only lead to the start.

Fitting in the palm of one’s hand, Elias’s delicate pieces remind us of the preciousness of even the most banal moments. Beneath sheets of toilet tissue, we might discover secret universes, available only to those with a childlike imagination and a thirst for adventure. Rouleaux is now available as a book, and the pieces are currently on view at the National Museum of Singapore until August 3, 2014. (via Demilked)

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Want To Be Featured In The Next Beautiful/Decay Book?

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Greetings from the Future! This is an update to let everyone know that our Future Perfect project is progressing…well, perfectly. With new submissions coming in each and every day, we’re looking forward to receiving your image of what a better tomorrow will look like. The deadline for all artists to submit work is March 29th and is quickly approaching. Visit the Future Perfect website for the details and submission guidelines and start picturing the future today!


Create your vision for a better tomorrow and get featured in Beautiful/Decay book 6.

We want to see the world you want to live in, your Future Perfect. Submit your work of art based on the Future Perfect theme; you are free to use any medium and interpret the theme as you see fit. On March 29th we will pick one lucky person from the submissions who will get a package of Beautiful/Decay goods valued at $300 and a 10-15 page interview in Beautiful/Decay book 6! Up to 70 additional future perfect submissions will also be selected and published.

Share your vision, plan a better tomorrow and join Beautiful/Decay to create a Future Perfect.

Click to Visit Future Perfect

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Jake Fried’s Psychedelic “Moving Paintings”

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Raw Data from Jake Fried on Vimeo.

It’s problematic calling the work of Jake Fried either animation or painting – it is a bit more than both.  Fried uses exceptionally simple materials: White-Out, coffee, ink, gouche, and paper.  He creates and image, and adds countless layers.  The result is an evolving and unfolding psychedelic image.  Fried appropriately calls this type of experimental animation “moving paintings”. Using the image of a face as its foundation, Fried quickly elaborates on the painting barely allowing the viewer’s brain to keep pace.  You can see more of Fried’s work previously featured here.  [via]

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Optical Illusion Paintings Look Like Cavernous Holes In Gallery Walls

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Artist Gina Ruggeri skillfully plays with perspective and spatial illusion.  Her work often takes the form of painted Mylar cutouts employing trope-l’oeil techniques.  Natural objects such as logs, stones, and smoke seem to float off the wall and into the gallery space.  In other work the white walls give way to rot, decay, and caverns.  Though Ruggeri’s work is eye-catching a definite and clear painting tradition stands out in her work.  She frequently forgoes the traditional canvas for plastic film but her composition and techniques is reminiscent of past styles.  The background landscapes of Renaissance portraits appear to have outgrown their frames (and conventional physics for that matter) and now unfold directly on the gallery walls.

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Austin Lee Strips Away And Finds The Core Of His Subjects

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A portrait tries to capture the essence of a subject. By honing in on a solitary figure usually from the chest up, we’re able to delve into the eyes and see beneath the surface. There’s some seriousness involved because the traditional portrait is used to capture a visual record which can act as a long standing account of that subject. Taking this and flipping it, painter Austin Lee creates cartoon-like portraits of re-imagined people and animals. Bursting with neon color and loose line, his subjects have nothing to hide and let it all hang out. His work associates with characterture and gestural expression mostly ending up as vignette laden pictures.

With titles like Dunno, Mr. Worry, Facepalm, and Taboo the idea of community and friends surface as the subject for many of his pictures. In one, two figures appear in the front windshield of a car, the anticipation in their faces is that of a destination thay are unfamiliar with. In another, “Crush” a Mona Lisa type portrait peers out from a cabinet frame portraying someone the artist has a crush on?

Using a similar approach Lee creates heads out of 3D prints and acrylic paint. These look like self-portraits and capture certain aspects of his personality with the least amount of rendering.  To some degree both his painting and prints reference minimalism in their quest to strip away and find the core of its subject.

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Surreal Animated Gifs Created By Reassembling Images

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BillDomonkos is a visual artist and filmmaker who we previously featured in May 2011. Most recently, he has begun posting gifs he’s made to his Tumblr page. If you’re familiar with any of his film work, then the animated gifs should resonate with you as they similarly reflect Domonkos’ aesthetic. In both forms, he collides and combine ideas and images using digital effects, editing, and manipulation to assemble a new experience of form. His work is largely informed by the elusive part of cinema, the ineffability of an expression that can only be sensed by evoking particular images, sounds, and feelings. The endless loops of the animated gif form brings something new to Domonkos’ aesthetic, allowing for the endless contrast of an animated image with a static image. His work reminds me of the last gif artist I posted, Tony Kinglux, who uses a similar process and method when creating his gifs, though there are obvious differences in their overall aesthetics. Domonkos lives and works in San Francisco.

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Robby Day

 

Robby Day’s delicate and intimate pen illustrations have a mysterious quality to them that makes one wonder who are these figures and what world do they live in. Are they shamans from another galaxy performing secret rituals or ancient beasts that lived deep in the woods? Look at the rest of Robby’s work after the jump and decide for yourself!

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Laser-Cut Wooden Records

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These aren’t your typical vinyl records.  Actually, they’re not vinyl at all.  Amanda Ghassaei seems to have perfectly situated herself between being a scientist and artist.  This project illustrates that well.  For it Ghassaei uses a laser to burn grooves into a variety of materials such as wood, acrylic, and paper.  The grooves are about two times larger than they would be on a regular record.  However, these DIY records are still entirely playable.  Check out the video after the jump to see her laser-cut records in action.

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