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John Malloy

John Malloy - Illustration

Surreal illustrations by John Malloy.

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Little People In A Big World

I usually wouldn’t describe street art as “sweet” but there is something delicate, nostalgic, and endearing about street artist Slinkachu’s “Little People” project. Started in 2006, Slinkachu paints miniature model train set characters, which he stages and sets in city streets. The works are documented via photographs but Slinkachu views them more as site specific installations. The scenes reflect the loneliness and melancholy that his cast of characters feel from living in the city, where these tiny people are lost and overwhelmed in a world not built for them.

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Ruben Ireland

In his dream-like art and illustrations, London-based graphic artist and illustrator  Ruben Ireland mixes traditional techniques — ink and acrylic — with non-traditional techniques — dirty water, food and weathered paper — and modern techniques — Photoshop and a wacom tablet. Women are fused with natural elements and despite the soft textures appear stronger and more beautiful for it. 

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Alex Roulette’s Fabricated America

Nostalgic paintings by Alex Roulette of a fabricated American experience.

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The Colorful World of Icelandic Graphic Designer Hrefna Sigurðardóttir

Young Icelandic designer, Hrefna Sigurðardóttir has a graphic sensibility that is bold and bright. Originally spotted via The Fox is Black, her portfolio is an eclectic mix of illustrative typography and design to art direction and styling, including several collaborations with photographer Magnus Anderson.

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Installation As Poetic Monument

Chris Lavery - InstallationChris Lavery - InstallationChris Lavery - Installation

Christopher Lavery’s sculptures and installations work as poetic monuments– stretching beyond one particular brand or medium, and focusing, instead, on the art of humanity in relation to our natural state of dreaming.

For instance, Cloudscape (top image above), a collection of representational clouds, stands as tall as 42 feet and hovers alongside Pena Blvd. in Denver, Colorado. Each piece, made of steel, solar panels, polygal, and LED lighting, allows us to reconsider our own relationship with the sky– how a cloud is a talisman or connector: nature’s billboard, ephemerally reminding us to look up and inward.

Big Gold Word Bubble (plan and model, 2nd and 3rd image above), his latest endeavor, after completion, will stand 14’ tall and examine this idea of how, parallel to the clouds, language is both concrete and abstract: a beautifully harmonized collective word bubble and diversely individualized journey of interpretation. To help support its construction and transit to Art in the Park at Elm Park in Worcester, MA, click here. To view more Cloudscape installation shots, scroll down after the jump.

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“Thingamajigs” Exhibition

OpenEyedDreams

The upcoming exhibition Thingamajigs, curated by Meenakshi Thirukode brings together individuals whose creative practice cannot be categorized under traditional tags. The show features a plethora of artists who push the boundaries of their practice, including prior B/D featured experimental group Lucky Dragons, B/D staff writer Colleen Asper, and B/D’s own Amir H. Fallah! A bevvy of Beautiful/Decay articles of history and memorabilia (including some of the first ever, hand-photocopied ‘zine versions) will be on display, alongside Amir’s painting. If you find yourself on a spiritual or artistic journey to India, be sure to check out this exhibition at Gallery Open Eye Dreams.

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Rafael Gómezbarros’ Giant Ant Installations Shed Light on the Plight Of Migrant Workers

Rafael Gómezbarros
Rafael Gómezbarros
Rafael Gómezbarros
 Rafael Gómezbarros

Casa Tomada is a project of traveling installations started in 2007 by Colombian artist Rafael Gómezbarros in which giant sculptures of ants are fixed in swarms on buildings and structures. Self-described as “urban intervention” by Gómezbarros, the ants have been showcased in locations varying from London to Cuba with a very specific goal in mind: shedding light on immigration, forced displacement, and uprooting through historical points of departure for travelers and immigrants. The 2-foot ants themselves are crafted out of tree branches for legs and two joined skull casts made of fiberglass resin and fabric to make up the torso, making for a particularly morbid, visceral depiction of migrant workers in Latin America who are looked at as nothing more than vermin.

When placed on the facades of government buildings and blank gallery walls alike, the ants give off a chilling sense of foreboding and encroachment. By placing them in swarms, Gómezbarros makes the insects even more strikingly representative of the peasants displaced by war and strife in Gómezbarros’ native Colombia. The giant insects that make up Casa Tomada, which translates to Seized House, are certainly works that are bound to linger with viewers, whether in nightmares or otherwise.

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