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Professor Teaches Human Anatomy By Painting Students Bodies

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DiazRmitPainting10

At RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, lecturer Claudia Diaz has implemented an unconventional project in order to inspire her anatomy students. After teaching  human anatomy for over 20 years, Diaz decided to try something new as she found the regular routine of anatomical memorization boring and uninspired. Over the past 3 years, Diaz has explored human anatomy with her students by having them paint the bodies of 10 students, revealing tendons and bones that would be visible if the person’s skin were stripped. Featured in these photographs is chiropractic student Zac O’Brien who patiently sat for around 18 hours while fellow students painted him. The finished result is what Diaz likes to call “anatomical man,” first brought to one of her classes in 2010.

”We walked him in and I still remember the looks on the kids’ faces. They were just in awe,” she said. ”I realised it shocked them, it inspired them and it motivated them.” Previously shy about taking off their clothes so classmates could study their bodies, the students began to shed their inhibitions through this painting exercise. ”I couldn’t get the kids to keep their clothes on. They were all throwing them off,” Dr Diaz said. (via)

This project seems to follow a trend in the merging of science and art, specifically within the study of human anatomy, and the direct involvement of real human bodies in order to reveal the beauty of the human body, inside and out.

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Heavy Metal Art: Banks Violette And Seven Other Artists On The Spectrum Of Dark And Gritty

Banks Violette

Banks Violette

Skinner

Skinner

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Ben Venom

This weekend on Beautiful Decay we want to welcome you over to the dark side, where a vast amount of artists are churning out contemporary art fueled by the fire of Metal.  A multitude of artists these days are making art inspired by the crushing sounds and dark spirit of Heavy Metal, Death Metal and Doom music, all of which weave in and out of several other genres.

I’ve been a huge fan for a while now of the work made by artists Skinner, Ben Venom and Martin Durazo, which are strongly informed by Heavy Metal.  This past week after chatting with artist and Beautiful Decay owner, Amir H. Fallah and artist Skinner and reaching out on Facebook to learn more about artists tied into this music scene, I was turned onto a breadth of incredible artists.  A lot of artists working with metal as inspiration have strong crossover into design and illustration, album art, posters (especially for the band Mastadon), band merch and murals.  There’s also a strong genre of work that explores dark spiritual matter, mythology and death that is absolutely captivating.  You can expect upcoming coverage of these sub-genres in coming weeks.

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This Is What Humans Looked Like 30,000 Years Ago

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The Paris-based sculptor Elisabeth Daynès listens to bones, to the remains of our evolutionary ancestors that have lived up to three million years ago. Throughout her prolific 20 year career, the “paleoartist” has worked from the skulls of wooly mammoths to species of hominid to create vividly detailed figures. Based on 18 data points that mark the bone, she can use a computer to model facial features that she later shapes out of clay. She refers to research and other bone samples to determine the build of her subjects, and ultimately she creates a silicone cast, complete with delicate painted features: veins, goosebumps, blemishes.

In a final step towards humanizing her sculptures, Daynès includes prosthetic eyes, teeth, and hair, each of which is as historically and scientifically accurate as possible. Current research suggests that Neanderthals, for example, had red hair; for her uncanny hominids, that range from Homo sapien to Homo erectus, she uses a blend of human hair. In her mind’s eye, the artist draws an informed portrait of each subject she reanimates; from the bones, she can determine period, sex and age, along with finer details like culture, climate, diet, and health.

For Daynès, this process is as much an art as it is a science. Ultimately, she hopes to reconnect with our past, embarking on a forensic search of what makes us human. Dismayed by the ways in which early human ancestors are reviled as unintelligent brutes, she injects her creations with a powerful dose of humanity; their brows furrow with concentration, and their eyes are painfully gentle. She explains “missing” them when they leave her studio for a permanent home in a museum. Take a look. (via Daily Mail and Lost at E Minor)

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All That Glitters Is Not Gold: Striking Diamond Paintings By South African Artist Kurt Pio

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One of the hottest talents to come out of South Africa lately is painter Kurt Pio. His practice includes printmaking, painting and sculptural pieces, exploring many different topics. But the most eye catching of his works, I think, would be his diamond series. A collection of abstract, fragmented, striking paintings of jewels, diamonds, and gems, his canvases are a display of his sensitivity to color.

With a background in interior design, Pio thinks of the designer’s point of view while painting his fine art pieces. He likes to create work that will suit the environment they could be placed in, and is finely tuned to the colors and atmosphere of his surroundings. This may have something to do with growing up in the picturesque Cape Town and appreciating it’s unique aesthetic.

You are constantly told by foreigners that the city is very beautiful. It’s a constant thing that you hear. But until you go traveling and compare your city to other places, that’s when you realize that what they say is true. I wanted to pay patronage to my home, and to celebrate the beautiful place that I’m living in. (Source)

Pio says the things around him are a massive influence on him; they are the things that make him the most excited. So, taking mundane objects, he combines that with a love of colors and contrast to produce some beautiful work. The talented painter is looking forward to the future, and is currently obsessed with the idea of using gold in his work. But as we can see from Pio’s Diamond series, gold is not the only thing that glitters. (Via The Jealous Curator)

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Sound Decay: Modeselektor’s Evil Twin

 

If you work all day in front of a computer then you will without a doubt relate to this Modeselektor video  where two figures battle it out in a world full of videos within videos. I myself am always in a battle with my computer monitor where one window is closed only to reveal another window full of work and information that I have to digest.  The entire scenarios takes place on a computer monitor with the figures jumping back and forth from screen to screen creating a clever and playful effect courtesy of director Dent de Cuir.  Watch the full video after the jump!

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Ellen Nielsen

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Ellen Nielsen is a “Jack of all Trades.”  Her wide array of skills range from sewing to video performance with imagery that goes from Psychedelic, to the surreal and dabbles in a bit of the absurd.

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Susan Jamison

 

Susan Jamison - Gothic Splendor

Susan Jamison - Gothic Splendor

 

Taking inspiration from a variety of sources including, but not limited to fairy tales, Renaissance portraiture, and botanical illustration,  Susan Jamison paints women adorned with vibrant pink embroidery patterns. In Jamison’s words, the animals and plants are carefully chosen for their symbolic meanings and lend the female figures a “contemporary, feminist inspired Snow White character.”

 

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André da Loba’s Cardboard Sculptures

André da Loba was born in 1979 in Portugal, to a mama and a centaur. In a family of nine brothers he was the ugliest. His nose was very big, and still is. As a result, his parents sent him to join a sea circus”.  His work has been published in a myriad of publications including the New York Times, Time Magazine, The New Yorker, Newsweek, and the Washington Post. “Currently he lives in New York City, where he is secretly happy”.

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