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HERB & DOROTHY – Arthouse Films

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This documentary features the story of self-made curators Herbert and Dorothy Vogel, a couple who began collecting works of unknown artists in the early 60s, crowding their little one bedroom apartment with tiny artworks by following two rules: 1. affordable, 2. small enough to fit in their apartment. The collection developed into one of the most important contemporary compilations – many of the amateurs they befriended in their early years continued on to become world renowned artists. Today, the collection is worth millions of dollars, but the couple has yet to sell a single piece. Their apartment got so packed, Dorothy reminisced, “Not even a toothpick could be squeezed in.” The couple donated a great part of their collection to the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C. The Vogels still live in the same little apartment, and have restarted their collection again. “Curatorial visionaries,” they started their collection on meager means, Herbert a postal clerk and Dorothy a librarian; even with the rising fame of their collection, the two have maintained a humble lifestyle, sharing their space with fresh art, 19 turtles, fish, and a cat!

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4 Hours Solid: Art Center GradMediaDesign Thesis Exhibition

This coming Wednesday and Saturday night, the thesis work from the GradMediaDesign department at Art Center will be on display at the South Campus Wind Tunnel, a former supersonic jet testing facility at 4 HOURS SOLID. On a personal note… I’m in this! Other graduate departments on campus (broadcast, fine art, environmental design, transportation design) will also be on display. The show will feature a very diverse group of work. The early versions of some of the thesis work has even been featured on BD in the past!

4 HOURS SOLID: Work and Ideas from the Graduate School at Art Center College of Design.

First Showing: Wednesday, April 18, 6-10 PM.
Second Shoring: Saturday, April 21, 8-10PM

Wind Tunnel Gallery, South Campus.
Art Center College of Design
950 South Raymond Ave., Pasadena, CA 91105

GradMediaDesign thesis project descriptions after the jump!

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Clement Valla Finds The Uncanny Landscapes In Google Earth

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If you’ve spent any time looking at Google Earth, you’ll notice that the photography isn’t always perfect; sometimes things appear a little weird. Brooklyn-based artist Clement Valla looks for these oddities, scouring the site and viewing places from different vantage points. At certain angles, highways appear as if they’re melting, dipping into ravines and rivers. It’s trippy. He collects these images and calls them Postcards From Google Earth.

These scenes aren’t the result of glitches or of errors in the algorithm, but are the logical result of the system. Valla explains, “They are an edge condition—an anomaly within the system, a nonstandard, an outlier, even, but not an error. These jarring moments expose how Google Earth works, focusing our attention on the software.” 3D images like we see here are generated through texture mapping, where the flat satellite image of earth is applied over 3D terrain. Most of the time this is seamless, but sometimes, when the spaces are so different, things look wrong. Valla goes on to remark:

Google Earth is a database disguised as a photographic representation. These uncanny images focus our attention on that process itself, and the network of algorithms, computers, storage systems, automated cameras, maps, pilots, engineers, photographers, surveyors and map-makers that generate them. (Via Amusing Planet)

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Claire Healy And Sean Cordeiro’s Recyclable Installations

Claire Healy and Sean Cordeiro - Installation

Claire Healy and Sean Cordeiro - Installation

Claire Healy and Sean Cordeiro - Installation

 

Claire Healy and Sean Cordeiro’s large scale installations leave us feeling a bit overwhelmed or claustrophobic, and this is perhaps maybe the point. Their installations use recyclables to not only emphasize the gluttony of spending, but even more so, to confront the looming power of clutter and our strange animalistic aversion and contrasting need for it.

Of their work, the two say, we “live in such an organized society where detritus is not an issue. You put your garbage in a bin, and it goes somewhere. When you start to look at detritus, you automatically think about refuse. Or even more about consumption…getting caught up in the cycle of consume, consume, consume. And how these objects start to quantify your life.”

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Devorah Sperber Pixelated Thread Spool Icons

Using hundreds of thread spools and a clear viewing sphere,  Devorah Sperber creates pixelated images of pop culture icons, famous logos, and reinterpretations of blue chip artworks. These works not only make viewers take a second look at the threaded installations but use the “wow” power of optical illusions to make us reconsider these famous icons and masterpieces from arts past.

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Andrew B. Myers

Andrew B. Myers is a photographer and image maker that lives and works in Toronto, Canada. His work is often characterized by its use of color and composition as well as it’s humorous take on pop culture. Not only are his images bold and captivating but his titles are fantastic. The above image is titled “Buyers Remorse.”

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Ramona Falls

Cool creative music video for Barsuck records recording artists, Ramona Falls. Directed by Stefan Nadelman. I wonder if this is made using all clip art?

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Gordon Parks’ Color Photographs Of Segregation

Gordon Parks was one of the seminal figures of twentieth century photography. A humanitarian with a deep commitment to social justice, he left behind a body of work that documents many of the most important aspects of American culture from the early 1940s up until his death in 2006, with a focus on race relations, poverty, Civil Rights, and urban life.

Recently The Gordon Parks Foundation discovered over 70 unpublished photographs by Parks at the bottom of an old storage box wrapped in paper and marked as “Segregation Series.” These never before series of images not only give us a glimpse into the everyday life of African Americans during the 50’s but are also in full color, something that is uncommon for photographs from that era.

Read more about the photographs in a great New York Times article written by Maurice Berger and visit the website of The Gordon Parks Foundation for more of Parks incredible images from one of the most important eras in American history.

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