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Eddy De Azevedo Recreates Rothko Paintings From Discarded Lighters

Eddy De Azevedo - Photography Eddy De Azevedo - Photography Eddy De Azevedo - Photography

Eddy De Azevedo used discarded lighters he had found and assembled them to into reimagined Mark Rothko works. Using Rothko’s color field paintings as a guide, De Azevedo created a photographic series using hundreds of lighters. He carefully collected and arranged the objects, which vary in color, size, and luminosity. When grouped together, his photographs are pleasing to look at as a whole or for their individual details.

The lighters work well as an interpretation of Rothko’s paintings. The original color fields are not flat colors, but vary in intensity, hue, and brush stroke. Much like these paintings, De Azevedo breaks up large areas of colors by staggering lighters and placing opaque and translucent ones next to each other.

De Azevedo is interested in the impact of a simple image. It’s why he is inspired by painters who work with large color fields. To him, these pieces have cross-cultural appeal. We all have a relationship to color, albeit all a different one. De Azevedo further enhances these paintings by adding objects. The lighters, paired with color, can be rich with meaning. In this way, he is creating an image that is more complex just beyond recreating Rothko’s works.

These images are just one part in De Azevedo’s series titled Walking My Dog. As the artist would go on long walks with his pet, he noticed all of the debris present along the ocean shore. He began collecting all of the scraps, which included more than 600 lighters, 1000 bottle caps, 200 fisherman gloves, and 2000 plastic bottles. De Azevedo has recycled this discard into appealing and colorful works of art. But, the staggering amount of material he has to work with is a good reminder of how much waste we actually produce, and our responsibility to take better care of the environment. (Via Feature Shoot)

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Jens Hesse’s Paintings on Corduroy Imitate Digital Distortions

German painter Jens Hesse’s work  is influenced by digital glitches and distortions. Cleverly using corduroy fabric as a base, Hesse creates fragmented images that are abstract and representational at once showing a glimpse of reality and creating unexpected abstract moments via imperfections in technology.

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Andres Medina’s Haunted Photographs

Spanish Photographer Andres Medina has a knack for creating beauty with very little. There’s really not too much action in a lot of his photographs. Somehow, though, he frames such emptiness with beautiful lighting and technique in a way that amplifies the emptiness of the world in a really appealing way. Some of Medina’s best stuff is taken at night. You can almost feel the moist, cold air in his night photos, and your ears prick up as you are drawn into their silent world. The pictures celebrate our passive surroundings, as the lack of animated subject matter minimizes distraction. Some things are centered around such an internalized power source that you have to black out the rest of the world just to notice them.

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YouCube


YouCube Demo Video from Aaron Meyers on Vimeo.

Friend and past-professor Aaron Meyers created this amazing project on his free-time. It allows you to map YouTube videos onto an interactive 3D cube and then save it to a database so you can show your friends. As you spin around a YouCube, the sounds of the different videos fade in and out. Its seriously amazing. My video is the last on the list but the first one to be created during the trial run… its called ‘Hamster Wheel’, so look for it! Aaron’s also worked on the awesome Radiohead video House of Cards. You can see more of his projects after the jump.

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Michael Clark

 

I’ll be the first to admit that I know absolutely nothing about dance, especially when it comes to ballet. I am, however, a huge Fall fan, which led me to these videos of choreography by Michael Clark, a British dancer who famously shook up the modern dance world by staging avant-garde productions often set to experimental or post-punk music. These clips come from a 1988 ballet called “I Am Curious, Orange” which was scored entirely by The Fall. As far as I can tell, there hasn’t been much proper documentation done of this work, but these YouTube clips, taken from Charles Atlas’ long out of print film Hail the New Puritan will have to suffice.

 

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Manuel de révolte au travail

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The brilliant aspect about instructional illustrations is that they speak for themselves (don’t miss the story in its ordered entirety by clicking on Read More below). But if you’re further wondering what this little beauty was intended for, it comes to us thanks to Packard Jennings and the Centennial Society who describes this as a “small, sixteen-page pamphlet… produced to put inside the postage-paid, business-reply envelopes that come with junk mail offers. Every envelope collected is stuffed with the pamphlet and mailed back to its original company.” Feel like participating in some subtle revolts of your own? I would recommend checking out their participate link!

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Jeff Muhs Paints Slipstream Sunsets Of Color

abstraction abstraction abstraction Jeff Muhs - Painting
Painter Jeff Muhs‘ latest series “Slipstream” features bright smears of color birthed from newsprint chaos. According to a press release, the series tries to bring the viewer to a “crossroad of intention and chance, where color and motion are freed from an objective context and becomes the subject itself.” The result is what feels almost like a vortex of hues that is floating in space, devoid of any real world shape or form.
According to Muhs’s biography, he draws much of his inspiration from the natural world. This influence is clear in the jewel-toned colors he uses and the organic way he allows the shapes to emerge from the background. Though there isn’t anything fabulously new about Muhs’s art, there is a meditative quality to it that makes you pause and take a moment to simply appreciate the colors of his work, much as you might do for a sunset. (via Dark Silence in Suburbia)

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Real Life Crime Events Constructed Out of Tape

tape art

tape art paintings
  Brad Kuhl and Monique Leyton tape art

Artist duo Brad Kuhl and Monique Leyton create large tapestries illustrated with various colors of acrylic, bookbinding, and packing tape. The subjects of their tape art is real life crime stories and offer social commentary based on themes of attraction and repulsion, fame and infamy, crime, morality and entertainment, and safety and danger. In “Elite Deviance,” specific references include the scandals of Enron, Martha Stewart, Jack Abramoff, and Bernie Madoff. In “Blunt Object,” Kuhl and Leyton depict news crime scenes in which the use of a blunt object was instrumental in a murder. By using this tape as a medium, the duo brighten up scenes of crime, illuminating darker aspects of our culture’s psyche. “We liked how the tape associated with police tape and ideas blossomed from there of what to make,” Leyton said. Originally from the States, they are currently living in Beijing where the city’s rapid evolution inspires their work. Most recently, they have started to work with new material, something that’s still adhesive, but not tape. “Elite Deviance” could be the last project they complete using this particular medium. (via juxtapoz)

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