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Andy Vible Replaces Heads With Miscellaneous Objects In His FIgurative Sculpture

Recent MICA grad Andy Vible makes “life-size sculptures of human bodies whose heads have been replaced by everyday objects”.

Straightforward enough. Or maybe not. By decapitating his sculptures he makes us feel slightly uncomfortable. In a way, we’ve lost our heads too, and that’s a good place to start. Without a head (without a brain), we are left fully subject to Vible’s will. He has our attention. And that’s where the “everyday objects” come into play. Vible inserts these elements (cctv cameras, loudspeakers, reference globes, birdhouses, etc.) into his works in order to “communicate in a type of language that everyone understands”. In common language and without our personal projections, the works are able to come across clearly. Click the link and hit your bookmark button. You know what to do.

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Stuff Vs. Stuff

This is what happens in the B/D closet when we’re not around.

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Abstract ‘Paintings’ Made From Coogi Sweaters

Jayson Musson painting1 Jayson Musson painting3

Jayson Musson painting6

The abstract ‘paintings’ by artist Jayson Musson (also known by his alter-ego Hennessy Youngman) are created from piecing together Coogi sweaters, a brand of sweater popular in the late 1980’s and early 90’s.  The sweaters carry especially specific associations – Clifford Huxtable of the TV sitcom the Cosby Show or the rapper Notorious B.I.G.  However, the sweaters are also known for a specific style that lends itself well to abstract art.  Musson elaborates:

“The thing I found most alluring about Coogi sweaters was how painterly they were. They seemingly lingered on the borders of gestural abstraction. I made the joke, “That Coogi looks like a Pollock”. Over the course of the following weeks, I began collecting images of the sweaters, studying their composition. They seemed to defy the traditional logic of the textile, opting instead to appear spontaneous and created by hand rather than machine-made. Each sweater, though a manufactured object seemed to seek its own authenticity.” [via]

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HUH. Magazine

HUH. magazineHUH. Magazine is a new free zine coming out of the UK. The color newsprint showcases some pretty neat art and photography from all around the world. You can find the dope zine in bookshops and galleries in London, NYC, Stockholm, Paris, and Chicago. Plus if you order it online, all you need to pay is postage. Pretty legit.

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Literally Balling: Victor Solomon Transforms Basketball Backboards Into Delicate Stained Glass

Victor Solomon Victor Solomon - Stained Glass and Mixed MediaVictor Solomon - Stained Glass and Mixed Media

Some may say basketball is their religion. Well, if you worship the game, then these stained glass basketball backboards might be right up your alley. Like stained glass windows that depict religious icons in churches and cathedrals, artist Victor Solomon places breathtaking and beautiful stained glass windows in place of basketball backboards. These are not likely to be used at any court that you’ve ever seen, as they are likely to shatter into a thousand pieces. Each piece is ornamented in luxurious materials and gems, including the basketball goal’s net and rim. This series, cleverly titled Literally Balling, embodies the lavish lifestyle and luxury that NBA all-stars. These superstars being like royalty, Victor Solomon adds an age old, delicate art to their domain.

Solomon hand assembles these brilliant and intricate creations in the timeless beauty of the Tiffany Style. What is ironic about this work is that although hypnotizing to look at, none of the remarkable basketball goals are by any means functional. They are as fragile and as easily broken as success and wealth. If a basketball player gets injured, they can be done with playing the game forever. Their career could be over. Solomon’s goals embody this brilliance, power, and delicateness that a life in the sports industry can have. If you want to see more of Victor Solomon’s amazing work, you can see more of his work here.

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Andres Serrano And Three Other Artists Make Work About Death

Andres Serrano

Andres Serrano

Tereza Zelenkova

Tereza Zelenkova

Berlinde De Bruyckere

Berlinde De Bruyckere

Death becomes us all eventually, as we are exploring in the works covered in this two part article.  In light of the Halloween season, and the historical implications of death of this season, we are highlighting artists who create work that addresses or is informed by death and dying.  Part 1 included and discussed the works of Damien Hirst, Doris Salcedo, Angelo Filomeno, Konrad Smolenski and Joel Peter Witkin.  Here we examine the work of Andres Serrano, Berlinde De Bruyckere, Tereza Zelenkova and Oskar Dawicki.

Andres Serrano has built a reputation creating imagery that is shocking and confronts the viewer with heavy content, unapologetically.  His series on death takes this to the next level. Each image, a close-up intimate composition of the deceased subject, is titled according to the cause of death.  The Death Series functions as a mirror of our own mortality, delivered rawly and beautifully in rich colors and blank stares.

The work of Berlinde De Bruyckere is rough and organic, abstractly anatomical and animalistic in delivery.  The artist’s sculptural work emanates a quality that lies somewhere between a murder scene and a meat locker.  De Bruyckere’s pieces have a realistic quality of flesh torn apart yet are executed with fairly common artistic materials such as wax, wood, iron, cotton and wool is captivating.

Tereza Zelenkova created a series entitled Supreme Vice during a journey through the deserts of the Southwest.  Captured in the bleakest and most barren of environments, Zelenkova’s photographic works meditate on death through a poetic narrative that seems to address a spiritual continuum that overlaps life and death and creates a bridge between the two polarities.  The black and white series, that spans grey areas of mortality, is bound in a book, also entitled Supreme Vice.

The obituary series by Oskar Dawicki which was first exhibited in 2004 in a show aptly titled “The end of the world by accident” is far more ironic than the previously mentioned works.  The photographic works capture collages Dawicki assembled of actual obituaries he discovered in the newspaper.  The names of the deceased in the images appear to be celebrities and other famous figures at first glance.  The works toy with the spectrum of perception of significance in the value of human life and death.

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The Collaborative Paintings Of Young Sons

Michael Ricioppo drew liverman painting

Michael Ricioppo drew liverman

Drew Liverman

I’ve known Drew Liverman longer than most other people in my life. Since the age of 14 we’ve gotten into all sorts of trouble together. At times we’ve lost touch for a year here or there but I feel a special connection to him that only happens when you spend your formative teenage years skateboarding and getting in trouble for graffiti together. One thing has been made clear over the last two decades of friendship with Drew. This guy is a creative super talent. I’ve always admired Drew’s creative abilities with anything that he takes on, whether it be our teenage graffiti shenanigans or his raw ability to jump from design, illustration, or painting with ease. With that said it’s no wonder that Young Sons, Drew’s latest collaborative project with Michael Ricioppo is also a visual feast.

Young Sons takes the concept of collaborative painting to new heights. Mixing a cornucopia of visual references from abstract expressionism to saturday morning cartoons, Ricioppo and Liverman work back and forth in unison and with intuitive speed canceling out, editing, and adding to one another’s marks. The result is a controlled chaos of line and form that is a bold mix of stream of consciousness and disciplined control.

See the work of Young Sons at Mass Gallery in Austin Texas through November 24th 2013 and read Andrew Bourne’s interview with them on Bomb.

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Hyperdub and Darkstar’s Gold Music Video

Evan Boehm is part of the interactive duo Sembler.  This is a digital mixed media project using “DIY technology” and real images from CAT scans, MRIs, and cadavers.

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