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Jessica Dalva’s Beautiful Sculptures Explore Inexpressible Moments Of Internal Struggle

"Barghest, or Look After Me" (detail view)

“Barghest, or Look After Me” (detail view)

"Viscera, or What More Can I Give"

“Viscera, or What More Can I Give”



"Abyss" (detail view)

“Abyss” (detail view)

Jessica Dalva is a Los Angeles-based artist who creates beautiful, wall-mounted sculptures depicting dark, fantasy imagery and the exploration of internal struggle. Recurring throughout her works is the feminine figure in various states of intensity and solemnity, such as sinking in a sea of grasping hands or engaged in somber rituals. Like religious artifacts, each sculpture carries a spiritual energy intended to resonate with the viewer. With metaphorical, mythological prowess, Dalva visually expresses the torments and transformations of subjectivity, from personal battles against fear, to moments of rapture and emotional healing.

Dalva’s works are currently being exhibited in a feature show titled Hapax Legomena at the La Luz de Jesus Gallery. “Hapax Legomena” refers to words that only occur once in a text or within a language, which often makes them untranslatable; Dalva uses the term to explore the singularity and ephemeral nature of an individual’s inner struggle. As outlined on the exhibition page:

“These experiences can be difficult to convey due to the lack of a context to anchor them, as well as the inherent gap between understanding and expression. The pieces are singular expressions of an idea, hapax legomena, in that they are representing distinctive concepts, as well as attempting to communicate the untranslatable through the imperfect language of art.” (Source)

An encounter with Dalva’s work is intended to be a subjective event, representative in some intuitive way of the hurdles encountered by everyone. Dalva’s darkly mystical works do an incredible job communicating the physicality of emotional pain and restoration; with their eyes fogged and eerie, the feminine figures become transcended forms, their bodies acting as expressive vehicles. It is left to the viewer to interpret the spiritual/emotional passage in which they are engaged.

Dalva’s show is on display until May 31st. Visit her website, Instagram, and Tumblr to follow her work. (Via Hi-Fructose)

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Awkward Family Photos Exhibits Only The Most Embarrassing Childhood Portraits





The magic of the family photograph lies in its flaws, and the curatorial team at website Awkward Family Photos has reminded us of this fact by collecting and cataloguing all of our charming photographic failings and reminding us that for every perfect chiclet smile, there’s a disgruntled side-eye or a bad haircut. The online collection is a testament to the bonds of family, and each accident betrays the touching vulnerability of each relationship.

The family photo album is a fragile, private thing; when made public, these images constitute a powerful and uncomfortable archive of American tradition and cultural shifts. While a photograph of mother, son, and daughter dressed to the nines in shoulder-padded polka-dots and acid wash jeans might have been swell in the ’80s, it serves now as a painful and permanent reminder of our fleeting coolness and relevance. In one image, a young man seductively holds a live snake; in a similarly embarrassing assertion of power within the family, a father superimposes himself over a cheesy portrait with now-outdated technology.

As family structures and fashion choices continue to shift, Awkward Family Photos is a visual historical narrative worthy of being preserved. And it will have its moment of glory in an upcoming exhibition at Santa Monica’s California Heritage Museum. The collection is to be arranged and hung in accordance with the following categories: “Family Portrait, Siblings, Vacation, Kids, Holidays, Weddings, Dad, Mom, Grandparents, Birthdays, and Family Pet.”

Exhibition goers will be invited to sit for their own portraits, which are to be added to the collection. This refreshing series is about embracing the awkward within us all; through each image, there are clear hints of love, charm, and unabashed playfulness. (via My Modern Met)

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B/D Best of 2010 – Gehard Demetz


Gehard Demetz was born in 1972, in Bolzano, Italy. Currently he lives and works in Val Gardena on these amazing woodcarvings. His vision is on point, and his work is nothing short than breathtaking. Check it out.

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I’ll start this post by saying that I’m not a fan of Lady Gaga’s music but you can’t deny that this video is one of the most bizarre, creative, disturbing music videos that has been made in the last couple of years.




Directed by Jonas Åkerlund (Madonna, Prodigy), the epic 8 minute video starts slow but right around the 3 minute mark all hell brakes loose as she is tossed off a balcony and left a bloody mess, riding around in a tricked out wheelchair with a bedazzled neck brace, dancing in crutches and bustier and matching helmet. The costumes alone deserve an award.

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Rob Bondgren


Rob Bondgren is an artist coming out of Chicago. His artwork takes a bit of reality and pushes it into a hallucinogenic state.

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Right on the thin line of what appears “real”, as in realistically painted, and an imaginary world of unrealistic things painted against expectation (with a subversive materiality), is where Eckart Hahn resides.  An object becomes the representation of the object, at the moment Hahn departs so realistically from the tactile world as we understand it, and a tension forms there in the vacuum left by Hahn’s desertion of the “actual”. Because of this schism of realistic unreality the paintings are activated, bringing a heightened awareness to the question of what the meaning might be, while still not unsealing the hermetic narratives with in.  Very much in the surrealist tradition, as Hahn comes by his image through a kind of directed automatism, (a strategy that seeks to short circuit the rigors and restrictions of scientific reason and Newtonian conclusions), the viewer receives the image somewhere in the unconscious while simultaneously seeking to interpret the paintings with the analytical mind.  And there we are caught in between, in a liminal space of possibility.

See Hahn’s solo show at Pablo’s Birthday in NYC through June 16th.

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105 Pariis

105 Pariis is the portfolio of  Dusseldorf, Germany based designer Enis Maksutovski. Enis effortlessly changes gears across a wide array of mediums from video, illustration, and photography with ease bringing us candy coated visuals that pack a powerful punch. More of his works after the jump.

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Alejandro Bombín’s Work May Look Like Digital Glitches But They Are In Fact Meticulously Detailed Paintings

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Alejandro Bombín’s paintings are deceptive. At first glance, many of them appear to be old, faded images from vintage publications that were scanned into the computer. Something went awry and now they look glitchy. But, what they actually are is meticulously detailed acrylic works that produce a digital mistake by hand.

By dividing up the image into rows (take a look at the detail above), Bombín is able to draw the the picture and fracture it by shifting the picture right or left from its original center. He uses a pointillist technique and pairs pure colors together, which from far away forms a cohesive image. And, at the same time, these colors and the texture from it are reminiscent of a lo-res, pixelated image.

The distorted images point to our desire to hold onto the past and the failings that we experience with technology. Digitizing something ensures that we’ll have it forever. Photographs and newspaper clippings? Not so much. But what happens when technology fails us too? Bombín’s paintings remind us that both can be fickle and that there are no guarantees.

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