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Christo And Jeanne-Claude’s Massive Fabric-Accented Landscapes

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Christo and Jeanne-Claude wrap and accent their environments with millions of square feet of rope shroud and fabric. Their wrapped and accented installations recontextualize the objects and their surrounding spaces, asking the viewer to consider both the presence and absence of the wrapped objects and the perception of new landscapes. At once conceptually simple and physically difficult to bring to complete fruition, the new environments are breathtaking in their starkness and beauty. Their installations often consume years of commitment and devotion. Wrapped Trees were the outcome of 32 years of effort.

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Vintage Portraiture Without An App

 Kathryn Mayo Winter and Douglas Winter - Photography Kathryn Mayo Winter and Douglas Winter - Photography Kathryn Mayo Winter and Douglas Winter - Photography

Kathryn Mayo and Doug Winter, a husband and wife photography team based in Sacramento, collaborate with their models to create vintage portraits, seemingly of the past, using the traditional wet plate collodion process. This type of photography was born in the 1850s, but soon faded from the foreground, due to the proliferation of more practical, less time consuming processes involving dry gelatin emulsion.

However, in today’s fast-paced iPhone app culture, where formatting is clean, easy, and instantaneous, ironically, the slow painstaking process is exactly what this artistic pair prefer about collodion. Mayo elaborates, “Each image takes about 15-20 minutes to complete from focusing the camera, coating and sensitizing the plate, exposing, and processing. So, models need to have patience as not each image comes out perfect, and it takes a few to get one we like–sometimes, there are times when the chemistry isn’t working up to par and we don’t get anything at all.” Regardless of outcome, their passion is not just about product, but discovery and investigation. Mayo continues, “I love the idea of using a process steeped in history and with the ghosts of photographers who have come before me.  It is a process that is wholly addicting.”

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Van Arno

 

Van Arno’s surreal narrative paintings are heroic figurative works featuring religious, folk, pop culture, and mythical heroes in whirlwind scenes that fall in the tradition of fellow low brow painters such as Robert Williams and Todd Schorr.

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Ryan Kenny

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Ryan Kenny’s photos seem to be about quiet moments of youthful exploration. Like those days when the city just boils over and you head up to Ojai to catch your breath for an afternoon. You and your favorite people are driving through those oak trees and no one’s really talking but that’s how it needs to be. These images are like that–catching your breath.

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Patrick Kyle’s Amazing Cut Paper Sculptures

Kyle Bean uses everyday materials such as colored paper and newspapers to create mind blowing sculptures. From police shields to cityscapes, no project is too big for Kyle’s paper wizardry!

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Larson & Shindelman’s Geolocation Series Captures the Locations Behind Tweets

For their series Geolocation, Nate Larson and Marni Shindelman mined for Tweets with publicly available GPS coordinates. They then traveled to and photographed those data-suggested locations and present their photographs with said Tweets as captions. The results are sometimes funny, sometimes poignant, and successful in exposing perhaps how little people think of what data they are putting out into the world and how easily it can be appropriated.

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Eddy De Azevedo Recreates Rothko Paintings From Discarded Lighters

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Eddy De Azevedo used discarded lighters he had found and assembled them to into reimagined Mark Rothko works. Using Rothko’s color field paintings as a guide, De Azevedo created a photographic series using hundreds of lighters. He carefully collected and arranged the objects, which vary in color, size, and luminosity. When grouped together, his photographs are pleasing to look at as a whole or for their individual details.

The lighters work well as an interpretation of Rothko’s paintings. The original color fields are not flat colors, but vary in intensity, hue, and brush stroke. Much like these paintings, De Azevedo breaks up large areas of colors by staggering lighters and placing opaque and translucent ones next to each other.

De Azevedo is interested in the impact of a simple image. It’s why he is inspired by painters who work with large color fields. To him, these pieces have cross-cultural appeal. We all have a relationship to color, albeit all a different one. De Azevedo further enhances these paintings by adding objects. The lighters, paired with color, can be rich with meaning. In this way, he is creating an image that is more complex just beyond recreating Rothko’s works.

These images are just one part in De Azevedo’s series titled Walking My Dog. As the artist would go on long walks with his pet, he noticed all of the debris present along the ocean shore. He began collecting all of the scraps, which included more than 600 lighters, 1000 bottle caps, 200 fisherman gloves, and 2000 plastic bottles. De Azevedo has recycled this discard into appealing and colorful works of art. But, the staggering amount of material he has to work with is a good reminder of how much waste we actually produce, and our responsibility to take better care of the environment. (Via Feature Shoot)

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Vintage Photographs Of The Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade Balloons

Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade

Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade

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Thanksgiving Floats

In lieu of kitschy turkey paintings I decided it would be fun to collect a few vintage images of the annual Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. The earliest of these was taken in 1931, and the newest in 1975.

The tradition started in 1924, tying in for the second-oldest Thanksgiving parade in the United States along with America’s Thanksgiving Parade in Detroit. The Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade has been a staple of New York life since the late 20’s; the popularity grew as the parade started to get televised in the 1950’s. Till’ this day, there’s nothing more iconic than the giant balloons that stroll across the city during this time of the year.

Until 1980-90’s the balloons in the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade came in two varieties. The first and oldest is the novelty balloon class, which fit on the heads of the performers. The second, and most famous, is the full-size balloon class, primarily consisting of licensed pop-culture characters.

On behalf of the B/D team, we want to wish you all a very happy thanksgiving. May you spend this day with your loved ones, and yummy food!

(Images via Daily News & Huff Post)

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