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B/D Holiday Sale- 20% off EVERYTHING!

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Beautiful/Decay is feeling festive this year….and so, we are having a holiday sale from now until January 1st. ALL merchandise on our online shop is 20% off! Yes everything, from B/D apparel, wallets, Beautiful/Decay subscriptions, jewelry, art zines and books….you name it! Just type in our special code BDXMAS20 at check out to save on your entire order! Hurry though- most orders must be placed by Dec. 16th-23rd to arrive in time for the Christmas holiday- check shipping deadlines after the jump!

Click here to SHOP NOW!

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Caroline Morin’s Dreamy Girls

Caroline Morin’s exquisite drawings of girls floating through space.

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Jennifer Sullivan- Bad Means Good

Jennifer Sullivan Paintings

When I first saw Jennifer Sullivan’s work I didn’t like it. But after looking at it for a few days it’s slowly growing on me. At first glance the paintings may seem naive and referencing the late 90’s craze of “bad painting” but I think there are some interesting things going on in the work that deserve a closer look.

Make sure to visit her site and explore the installations that sometimes accompany the work as well as Jennifer’s hilarious “feelings/Ideas” section where she ponders everything from “art based outfits” to “Artists That I Think Are Really Cool”.

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Will Ellis’ Haunting Photographs Of Broken, Muddied, And Forgotten NYC Treasures

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For Lost and Found, the photographer Will Ellis photographs objects collected from the deserted buildings, parks, and bays of New York City. Dating back to the first half of the 20th century, each recovered object is shot with the utmost care, regardless of condition or value. The artist’s long journeys in search of his discarded relics— traversing less frequented city spots with haunting names like Dead Horse Bay and North Brother Island— give historical and totemic meanings to each possession. Once relevant only to a forgotten child, a plastic toy shoe from the 1920s is studied under lights, archived by a seemingly objective lens, and repurposed as evidence of some imagined urban ancestry.

Ellis’s choice to incorporate animal bones into a few of the images strengthens the work’s genealogical impulse; a set of hospital keys, ripped from their locks and rusted beyond recognition, stands alongside a raccoon bone separated from its socket in time. Similarly, a horse bone from the city’s industrial age is visually equated with a pair of plastic doll arms; shot from the same angle, the eroded bone and muddied plastic occupy similar portions of the frame, each lit with expert precision.

As if part of a museum catalog, the series of 30 photographs provides a cohesive, if subjective, vision of history. Through the eyes of Lost and Found, the city’s children narrate its evolution, telling a visual story that begins with doll, touches on music book, and culminates in senior portrait. Ellis’s choice of a stark white backdrop and harsh lighting brilliantly avoids potential sentimentality; as the artist invites us into a distinctly nostalgic space, we are instructed to view the work with the utmost seriousness. Take a look. (via Feature Shoot)

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Stuntkid

farmville Jason Levesque aka Stuntkid is having an upcoming show May 4th – May 29th at the Jfergeson Gallery in VA.

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Peculiar Portraits Combine Vintage Photos And Extinct Birds

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Sara Angelucci’s intriguing series titled Aviary recalls the past to create strange portraits of birds that are superimposed onto anonymous nineteenth century cartes-de-visite (small, business card sized) photographs. It began by the artist studying the American Victoria area, and she connects its cultural, social, and ecological aspects conceptually to her work.

The nineteenth century was the United States’ colonial era when there was unprecedented expansion, exploration, and an interest in science and art. Family photo albums and commemorating memories were something new, as photography became increasingly common. The collection of cartes-de-visites were like trading cards, and the urge to collect didn’t stop there. People had cabinets of curiosities that included things like taxidermied birds, an interest that lead to the extinction of the passenger pigeon. Angelucci explains in a statement about the work, writing, “Made by combining photographs of endangered or extinct North American birds with anonymous nineteenth century cartes-de-visite portraits—they portray creatures about to become ghosts.”

She goes on to muse:

So how do we read these strange human-birdlike creatures? One could at once see them as manifestations of their time: a hybrid crossover of faith in science with a belief in otherworldly beings. As W. G. Sebald writes in Campo Santo, “[photography is] in essence, after all…nothing but a way of making ghostly apparitions materialize by means of a very dubious magical art.” And, what would it mean to embody another creature: Could one then see, feel, and understand its desire to live? Might we then imagine the Aviary portraits as chimera suspended in a state of empathy, and wonder what our treatment of other sentient beings might be if we could feel what they feel, or see what they see? (Via Observer: Design Observer)

 

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People on the Beach are Reduced to Tiny Specs in Gray Malin’s Photos

Final mourning of the end of summer. Aerial photos of beaches and beach people from California-based photographer Gray Malin. These are part of a series entitled À La Plage, À La Piscine. Malin shot the pictures from the open door of a helicopter flying over beaches and pools from the U.S. to Brazil, to Australia. Reducing us to our tiniest, the photographs reveal patterns that would’ve been otherwise undiscovered. (via)

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You Were In My Dream

You Were in My Dream is a incredibly interactive installation where the viewer becomes part of the story. It takes a live video feed of your face, and incorporates it into the installation. Created in collaboration by Isobel Knowles and Van Sowerwine.

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