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Incredible Photos Of NYC’s Underworld By Wall Street Banker Chris Arnade

"Takeesha was working one of the streets in an empty industrial area. She called me over and said, 'Hey, take my picture,'" Arnade recalls. "I was relatively cautious initially because I didn't want to be insulting, but she opened up and started telling me her life story."

“Takeesha was working one of the streets in an empty industrial area. She called me over and said, ‘Hey, take my picture,'” Arnade recalls. “I was relatively cautious initially because I didn’t want to be insulting, but she opened up and started telling me her life story.”

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A former Citigroup financier of 20 years, Chris Arnade, became disillusioned by the narrow-mindedness and greediness of the corporate world. As a way to escape his unhappiness in Wall Street, he started taking long walks with camera in hand. He strolled through Hunts Point in the Bronx, one of the city’s most dangerous neighborhoods. It was there, while on a walk around town, where he met a very friendly and honest prostitute named Takeesha.

She opened up, he photographed her. Astonished by her honesty, Chris insisted in creating a positive and honest image of her friend Takeesha.

From then on his life changed for the better. He traded his job for his new-found hobby: Taking honest and vibrant photographs of prostitutes, homeless people, and drug addicts in the South Bronx. He would not only take photographs of them, but he would also get acquainted and makes friends with these ‘rejects of society.’

“Hunts Point is a dark cloud with a silver lining. It’s people who are seemingly in the lowest of the low positions who are still somehow resilient. Those moments of resilience can be very optimistic.”

Although there are many whom are against his work (some calling it ‘exploitative’), Arnade stands by his images and his daily walks with pride. In a way, this is Arnade’s way to give back. See, Aranade grew up with the Catholic Church, a doctrine which taught him to do good in order to make up for the sins he’s committed in the past. Although always a very honest man, Arnade’s past with Wall Street haunts him daily, and his new found love of the camera and new friends make up for the piled guilt he felt for many years.

I want to make conventional portraits for unconventional people.

His images are simple, yet quite powerful. He captures these reject’s livelihood in a very honest and nonchalant way. The background is their native space and not a studio. Their clothes is not borrowed, but its theirs. Arnade’s images are crammed with damaged, but optimistic outlooks- he does not what to portray anything different; vulnerability is key. (via PolicyMic)

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Frank Marshal’s Journey Into The Heavy Metal Subculture Of Sub-Saharan Africa

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Frank Marshall

Frank Marshall

Frank Marshall

Renegades, a photographic series by Frank Marshal, captures the Heavy Metal subculture in Sub-Saharan Africa.

As we know, Heavy Metal audiences have traditionally been Caucasian and Eurocentric. All of these things, however, are not an obvious description of Sub-Saharan Africa. Marshall’s portraits offer a vision of an unlikely Heavy Metal subculture in Botswana, his subjects are an anomaly, a reaction to a strictly occidental genre. Marshall aptly labels his subjects as renegades, as he renders portraits of rebellious individuals who form part of “an ulterior, emergent rootedness where traditional identities and political histories in Botswana are subverted”. Furthermore, Marshal’s portraits break down established archetypes of ethnicity, cultural identity, and ideology. These individuals are on the fringe of a society that is already situated within the ‘geographical and ideological’ space of the Other, meaning that they are already viewed as exotic by the Occident.

The peculiar thing here is, that we see the ‘Other’ under an completely unpredictable light.

Tribe-like, Heavy Metal possesses an unconscious sense of brotherhood that transcends race and nationality in the context of Renegades. So too, Marshall’s renegades unpack popular stereotypes, transcending traditions, blurring the boundaries between liberty and fraternity, helping to delineate the power structures inherent to Heavy Metal, which may be misinterpreted as a trace of an oppressive past. This is in keeping with the extremism of Heavy Metal ideology, embracing anything that popular culture finds unacceptable.

(via Rooke Gallery)

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Ecological Anxieties As Surreal Paintings

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There is something unsettling in many of the paintings of Alexis Rockman.  His work typically depicts the natural world – wildlife of different sorts in locales as varied.  The scenes are surreal as strange groupings of animals converge on a single canvas.  However, some sort of order appears to be breaking down and a chaos not often found in nature seems to be gaining ground.  Rockman’s paintings illustrate a wider ecological anxiety over our troubled world.  In a way he uses his paintings as a form of protest.  The work becomes a powerful expression of deep concern that is easy to feel.

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Pantone Colors You Can Eat!

Pantone colors seem to be all the rage these days with licensing deals being made for everything from messenger bags to stationary. However this collection of images designed by French food designer Emilie de Griottes takes the cake (or tart!). Commissioned by culinary magazine Fricote, Griottes created tasty tarts based around the gorgeous colors that creatives depend on to make all sorts of design magic happen. We’re hoping that with the popularity of this photo spread we’ll soon be able to order a Pantone 7507C tart with extra banana from your favorite dessert spot. (via junk culture)

 

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Taizo Yamamoto’s Drawings Of Homeless Shopping Carts

Taizo Yamamoto‘s shopping carts are familiar images we’ve all seen before. Crammed into  alleyways or left abandoned in the streets, these shopping carts are part of the scenery of a city. Yamamoto uses graphite and colored pencils to illustrate the carts in great detail, highlighting their contents and the strange collections contained within. By choosing to exclude the people who use these carts, Yamamato is bringing all the focus to the carts themselves. There’s a sense of an anthropological study here, like these carts and the collections they contain are specimen meant to be studied.

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Glitch Art Transformed Into Blankets And Tapestries

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New Media artist Phillip Stearns contrasts two mediums in a way that also conjures unexpected similarities.  Stearns has considerable experience with glitches – he’s the author of a Tumblr blog that presented a different glitch screen shot each day.  He went on to combine the cold digital spattering of glitches with warm textiles such as blankets and tapestries.  The pixels translate strangely well from screen to weave, the glitches not being lost in translation from one medium to the other.  Stearns says about his project:

“The Glitch Textiles project was started in 2011 with the goal of exploring the intersections of textiles and digital art. The idea was simple: Transcode glitches in the cold, hard logic of digital circuits into soft, warm textiles.  Following a successful funding campaign on Kickstarter in 2012, Glitch Textiles has grown to include a range of woven and knit wall hangings and blankets whose patterns are generated using images taken with short circuited cameras and other unorthodox digital techniques, including data visualization aided by the use of tools developed for digital forensics.”

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Mark Dean Veca: Made For You and Me

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Artist Mark Dean Veca opened his new solo exhibit Made For You and Me at Cristin Tierney  January 31st and is on view through March 9th.  The title of the exhibit is a lyric from the Woodie Guthrie song This Land is Your Land.  The song, originally expressing an anti-capitalist sensibility, has since often been appropriated to convey capitalist sentiments  such as growth through consumption.  Interestingly, Veca’s work often reverses this same process.  He re-appropriates corporate images to comment on corruption, consumption, and a generally waning culture.  Appropriately the gallery statement calls his work a kind of “Sinister Pop”.  This is particularly evident in his piece titled Tailspin.  The piece depicts the Exxon-Mobil Pegasus pointing down, blue on one side, red on the other, and spinning.  Tailspin subtly references a society’s consumption dependent on energy resources that are exceedingly spinning out of control.

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Made With Color Presents: Tik Ka Shares His Inner World By Painting Angelic, Heaven Sent Children

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Artists from all over the world choose Made With Color to Create beautiful portfolio websites that set them apart from the pack. With clean layouts, easy to use interface, and drag and drop functions you can build a professional website in minutes. This week, we are pleased to present the embryonic world of  Made With Color user Tik Ka.

It’s a fantasy dreamland we’re entering. Tik Ka is a Chinese artist whose emotions translate in a multitude of soft, joyful colors. He depicts characters which could be aimed to entertain kids. The eyes and expression of his subjects speak a language of empathy, sincerity and gentleness. And even we, as adults, are touched but the vast generosity Tik Ka is offering us.

The work of Tik Ka is also known as “So Ha” Art. A combination of traditional Chinese culture and lovable babies and kids. The artist has incorporated Chinese characteristics with Western elements and Japanese superflat technique. He has created a style of his own, a signature easily recognizable. His most recent work has led him to represent purity and innocence with just a hint of a smile on the children’s faces. They appear angelic and heaven sent.

Before the life journey begins, we have all waited on a platform, gasping for the first breath, opening our eyes and catching a glimpse of the whole new world.  The platform is a place of purity, where only the heartbeat of the mother and the murmur of the outside world can be heard.”

Children’s faces, babies still connected to their mother by an umbilical cord. Tik Ka’s depictions dives our souls into an inviting, delightful and poetic aura.

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