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Daniel Eatock

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Daniel Eatock, AKA the co-creator of indexhibit has some interesting participatory projects of his own. This project, “No photographs” asks that people submit photos of signs telling them not to take photographs.

 

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The Annual Post-It Show Opening: This Weekend

 

Post-its by Sean Norvet

Post-it by Renee French

The Post-it note show curated by Mark Todd and Esther Pearl Watson is back in full force beginning tonight, Saturday Dec. 8th at 6-10 pm at Giant Robot.   Its now in its eighth edition and has a record number of artists participating, over 260 artists contributed and over 2000 post-its will be on display.  Below is a small sampling of the artists that are involved: Audrey Kawasaki, Amy Sol, Xi Chen, Luke Chueh, Tim Biskup, Dave Chung, Jennifer Cotterill, Alex Chiu, Ching Ching Cheng, Mike Kelley, Skinner, Josh Ellingson, Martin Hsu, kaNO Kid, Jeremiah Ketner, Travis Lampe, Mark Nagata, Tom Neely, Martin Ontiveros, Souther Salazar, Emilio Santoyo, Gary Baseman, Gary William Musgrave, Bradford Lynn, Jesse Tise, Mike Bertino, Shannon Freshwater, Arthur Giron, and many, many others.

Check out a preview of the post-its I could dig up before the show after the jump: (via)

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Francesco Spampinato

What artist Francesco Spampinato lacks in interweb presence, he makes up for on his canvas. Francesco feeds us a kaleidoscope explosion of psychedelic decorations that pulsates in waves from the focal point of the canvas-to the deepest center of the viewer’s brain.

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Shawn Brackbill on Finding Unique Ways to Photograph New York Fashion Week

As part of our ongoing partnership with Feature Shoot, Beautiful/Decay is sharing Roger Kisby‘s interview with photographer Shawn Brackbill.

Shawn Brackbill is a Brooklyn, New York based portrait, fashion and music photographer.

I first came across your work a few years ago on Flickr. It seems like you were shooting mostly musicians then. How did you come to be involved in shooting fashion week?
I was shooting mostly musicians up until my first Fashion Week. I pitched a shoot to Dazed and Confused in July of 2008 to cover an event called Boadrum 88. It was started the year before by The Boredoms, a Japanese band, and that year Gang Gang Dance would be leading the performance of 88 drummers here in Brooklyn. I covered the event using multiple Polaroid cameras and Yashica Electro GSN rangefinder I had acquired from Ebay and refoamed.

A few weeks after delivering the images from that shoot, Dazed contacted me about covering the Spring / Summer 2009 New York Fashion week for them. They basically sent me out with a list of shows to cover and not much direction. That season I started to figure out what and how I wanted to cover Fashion Week and was hooked.

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Heather Dewey-Hagborg Uses DNA From Chewing Gum To Create 3D Portraits

Dewey-Hagborg- installation

Dewey-Hagborg- installation

Dewey-Hagborg- installation

Dewey-Hagborg- installation

Artist Heather Dewey-Hagborg uses DNA extracted from items like chewing gum and cigarettes to create three-dimensional portraits. For her project, “Stranger Visions,” Dewey-Hagborg collected discarded trash from the streets of Brooklyn, New York and sequenced them at a biotechnology lab. Through this process, she was able to isolate specific DNA strands, which helped her unravel the ethnic-gender identity of the past users. She used that information to create a sketch of what each of these people might have looked like. This information was then relayed via three-dimensional printer into the final hanging works.

As an information artist, Dewey-Hagborg is interested in the intersection between technology and art but her work is more complex than that. Through “Stranger Visions” Dewey-Hagborg confronts the impossibility of privacy. If even the smallest bit of rubbish can detail what we look like, what else could be used to expose us to the world at large? Is DNA the identity theft problem of the future? (via Design Faves)

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Eric Ross Wiley

Brooklyn-based artist Eric Ross Wiley use of traditional materials, such as oil paint and canvas, is subverted with his experimentation with canvas stretching and bullet holes – which underplay the playfulness of the bright hues of his art. More of this work after the jump.

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Died Young Stayed Pretty

I gotta admit that I was really excited to see Died Young Stayed Pretty, a new full length documentary focusing on the DIY rock poster (see gigposters.com) movement that has brewing in the US and beyond for the the last decade. The doc has hundreds of interviews with big names (many of whom you’ve never heard of) within the close knit rock poster scene,who discuss personal taste, poster philosophies, and what role money,drugs, and 70’s&80’s porn plays in rock posters. Many of the artists interviewed are amazingly talented (i.e. Tyler Stout & Brian Chippendale) and interesting, sharing with the viewer a small glimpse of their creative process.

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Jason Borders’ Carves Insanely Detailed Patterns Into Animal Skulls And Bones

Jason Borders - Engraved Bones Jason Borders - Engraved Bones Jason Borders - Engraved Bones Jason Borders - Engraved Bones

Jason Borders has been collecting different animal skulls from before he started school. Always looking for more objects to add to his cabinet of curiosities, he explored his local neighborhoods picking up bits of bones and cartilage. Years later, he has turned that obsession into an art form, showcasing his talent in galleries, shops and collections around the country. He carves patterns and designs that resemble traditional Mehndi tattoos. He usually lets the shape of the skull or bone that he is working on dictate the design he carves. He then covers the work in ink or a striking color.

Borders remembers the day his hobby turned a bit more serious with amusement. After discovering the carcass of an elk while in the desert, and loading it all into his car – an action that almost got him arrested, took it back to his garage. There he cleaned the bones and noticed something that helped him take his craft to the next level.

Looking at the Dremel and looking at the bones next to each other, I picked it up and started working on it. The garage was right underneath my house, and I ended up filling the house with bone dust, and made myself really sick and made my wife really angry. Then I did it another four years, but I’m much more careful these days. (Source)

Borders also paints and carves other items, but has a particular affinity toward skulls. He treats his work as a way of overcoming his fears – particularly ones concerning mortality. He says because he is always working with the idea of death – quite literally,  it helps him live his life with intent and purpose. And what a great purpose he has found. (Via Faith Is Toment)

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