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Awesome Video Of The Day: Robot Makes Paintings

 

I always thought that robots would one day make all the art in the world but I never imagined that the day would be so near. Benjamin Grosser’s Interactive Robotic Painting Machine uses artificial intelligence to paint its own body of work and to make its own decisions. While doing so, it listens to its environment and considers what it hears as input into the painting process. In the absence of someone or something else making sound in its presence, the machine, like many artists, listens to itself. Watch a video of the robot in action after the jump!

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Cut Paper Art By Alexis Facca

Alexis Facca - Paper

Alexis Facca - Paper

Cut Paper Art

Alexis Facca is a Belgium-based paper artist and set designer, known previously as Paper Donut. He recreates everyday objects in paper, which are used in both his personal work and commercial endeavors, including animation. Facca’s paper sculpting is successful on a number of levels – his attention to detail and craft, the formal aspects like color and composition, and its ability to amuse and delight us. His work is memorable, which is especially important when working with advertising clients.

In addition to paper, Facca has recently composed compositions that use other materials like popcorn and barbecue skewers. He also includes metal grates and wood blocks, too. His better known works, however, are objects recreated from paper. This means he has constructed filing cabinets, copy machines, and large potted plants. He has created life-size breakfast foods, too, including angular fruit, donuts and eggs. Yum!

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Graphic Paper Cut Outs Transformed Into Street Art

Joe Boruchow graphic cut outs Joe Boruchow street art1

Joe Boruchow street art9

Street Artist Joe Boruchow is an expert at manipulating positive and negative space.  His work intertwines stark black and white graphic cut outs, often cleverly playing each off the other.  Boruchow’s street art compositions are made up of simple but powerful images, wheat paste posters in public spaces.  He interacts with his work, much like a stencil or etching, indeed, frequently creating corresponding cut paper pieces of his posters.  While adeptly balancing positive and negative space in each poster, Boruchow also give careful attention to the postivie and negative space of the city.  His posters can be found filling empty areas of doorways, windows, and walls.

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Ryan Trecartin for W magazine


Ryan Trecartin has done it again in his spread for W magazine (released last month), responding with the complete mastery over emblems of consumer culture and social networking. The traditional fashion spread has become unrecognizable in its form yet perfectly familiar in its content and heavy use of symbols and signs. For the online conception fashion magazine DIS, titled Web 1.0, the artist has made his creative and production process visible: a shot list with a myriad of influences described and called out to the last detail. The dizzying list definitely qualifies as an art piece.

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Antoine Rose’s Risks Death To Take These Bird’s Eye Photos Of Miami Beaches

Beach Candies

Beach Candies

Turquoise

Turquoise

Red District

Red District

Insectarium

Insectarium

Photographer Antoine Rose captures Miami’s beaches and its coastline in the series Up in the Air Miami. Shot from a bird’s eye view, umbrellas, beach goers, and yachts are miniaturized and abstracted, and look like tiny toys used in a diorama. The candy-colored images offer an unusual glimpse into a day on the water, as we see only a general depiction of the beach yet its captured on a large scale. We aren’t offered many details, but still, there is a lot of energy in these photographs. Rose communicates leisure, and minuscule figures evoke the famous French post-impressionist “bathers” series by Cezanne.

Emmanuel Fremin Gallery in New York City is exhibiting Rose’s works, and they describe how the extreme point of view affects what we’re seeing:

… people sharing common behaviors and exposing themselves like hedonistic herds. The stills of people swimming, surfing or just sitting down on their beach pads suggest a showcase or, given the distance, an Insectarium. One can even see a religious connotation: the bird’s eye view makes people seem insignificant dots in the infinite space of the universe, crushed by the immensity of the water field, recalling the biblical universal flood; seen from the sky, like through god’s eyes, people and nature coexist in harmonic or tense relationships. -Eduard Andrei

Miami isn’t the first or only place that Rose has photographed. Previous series of Up in the Air include the Hamptons, Long Island, and Wollman Skating Rink in New York City. To capture these images, he is situated outside of a helicopter that flies as low as 600 feet.

View Up in the Air Miami at the Emmanuel Fremin Gallery from February 27 – May 3.

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Paul Herbst’s shit is gold

Paul Herbst

London photographer Paul Herbst’s description of his website, my-shit-is-gold.net, and his zine: “In an existential exclamation of withdrawal, Paul Herbst’s photographs at once portray a world of subtle intensities with momentous simplicity. His images hosts a constant dialogue between what we perceive and what we understand, leaving us aloof in the gaps of unanswerable questions. This all cleverly comes together in an inter-play of heavy textures and washed out tones.”

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Experimental Typography and Fruits collide in Typefruitography

Typefruitography is a series by Garret Steider of the letters of the alphabet carved into the item of food that it corresponds to.The result is a playful take on typography and a gorgeous series of posters that any type nerd would be proud of. (via colllater.al)

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Albert Seveso’s Ink Clouds


We’ve all probably spent too much time watching creamer dissipate into coffee (or at least i did when i bussed tables). The interesting part to me wasn’t how beautiful and otherworldly the plumes looked, but how watching them never seemed to get old. Italian photographer Albert Seveso obviously shares this fascination and expands on it with varicolored inks which he captures with high-speed photography as they unfold underwater. Captured like this, the ink looks incredibly physical, like glass sculptures. Witnessing the transformation of substances feels like watching the cosmos themselves, which we are in a sense, and is why this is a series third graders and thirty year olds alike can get behind.

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