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B/D Biannual Subscription Sale! Only 3 Days Left!

There’s only 3 days left until we ship out Beautiful/Decay Book:7!  To celebrate the occasion we are offering a discounted subscription rate to you our loyal readers. We only discount our subscriptions twice a year so if you’ve been putting off getting that subscription now is the time to do it.

Enter in discount code discountdecaysub during your check out and receive $6.00 off a one year subscription! This deal will only be good for until this monday at midnight PST (12/5/2011). So act now or get stuck paying full price!

 

 

 

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Amanda Boe’s Poetic Photos Of The In-Between

Amanda Boe Amanda Boe Amanda Boe

Reveling in the small, quiet corners of everyday life, Bay Area photographer Amanda Boe explores themes of isolation, curiosity and mise-en-scene in her strange, stunning work. When looking through images from her series Here and There, it’s easy to let your mind wander into each frame, gently prompted to think about time, place, and what it feels like to be “passing through.” The crisp simplicity of her work is charged with her natural sensibilities as a curious, highly-engaged observer—collecting visual treats as she moves through the world. Boe investigates the places in-between the larger moments of life, and reports back with work that is meditative, personal and poetic.

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Jenn Ackerman Photographs The Reality Of Mentally Ill Prisoners In America

“To accurately portray the reality of living with mental illness for prisoners in an effort to call attention to the increased imprisonment of the mentally ill in the US” is the stated goal of Jenn Ackerman’s series Trapped.

Ackerman began photographing inside Kentucky State Reformatory in 2008. Over the course of her time there she gained trust of the inmates and guards and unprecedented access to their facility and procedure. The resulting series is a stunning look inside the experience of the mentally ill shuffled through a prison system not equipped to withstand, care for, or rehabilitate them. A system in dire need of attention and reform. (via)

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Studio Orta

studio-ortaFrom February-March 2007, the artists installed ‘Antarctic Village’ in Antarctica, travelling from Buenos Aires aboard the Hercules KC130 flight on an incredible journey. Taking place during the Austral summer, the ephemeral installation coincided with the last of the scientific expeditions before the winter months, before the ice mass becomes too thick to traverse. Aided by the logistical crew and scientists stationed at the Marambio Antarctic Base situated on the Seymour-Marambio Island, (64°14’S 56°37’W), Jorge Orta scouted the continent by helicopter, searching for different locations for the temporary encampment of their 50 dome-shaped dwellings. Antarctic Village is a symbol of the plight of those struggling to transverse borders and to gain the freedom of movement necessary to escape political and social conflict. Dotted along the ice, the tents formed a settlement reminiscent of the images of refugee camps we see so often reported about on our television screens and newspapers. Physically the installation Antarctic Village is emblematic of Ortas’ body of work, composed of what could be termed modular architecture and reflecting qualities of nomadic shelters and campsites.

The dwellings themselves are hand stitched together by a traditional tent maker with sections of flags from countries around the world, along with extensions of clothes and gloves, symbolising the multiplicity and diversity of people. Here the arm of face-less white-collar worker’s shirt hangs, there the sleeve of a children’s sweater. Together the flags and dissected clothes emblazoned with silkscreen motifs referencing the UN Declaration for Human Rights make for a physical embodiment of a ‘Global Village’.

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Iain McKell’s Photographs Of Modern Day Gypsies

Iain McKell- Photography

Iain McKell- Photography

Iain McKell- Photography

Iain McKell, a renowned fashion and social documentary photographer, has compiled a series of compelling images, The New Gypsies, which depicts both the physical and emotional life of a modern traveler community living in the outskirts of a technology-driven society. McKell creates surreal images that almost treat his subjects as fictional characters, yet we find that there is an undeniable hint of warmness, liveliness and honesty that instantly creates a strong bond between viewer and subject.

The British horse-drawn travelers whom sport decorated caravans, colorful clothing, and share a desire for freedom from the trappings of contemporary life, served the artist as more than just an artistic project; he calls the 10-year study “a personal journey.”

With these photographs, McKell intends to show a way of living that is both colorful and meaningful- something that lacks in contemporary living. He states that the tribe draws from the past and combines with the future, therefore “creating a set of progressive new ideas and values that are not based on materialism […] and are not chained by the stress and complications of our modern existence.”

In 2011, the photographer published a book of the series by the name of The New Gypsies by Ian McKell, it includes essays by Val Williams and Ezmeralda Sang. (via Huffpost Arts & Culture)

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Kelley Smith’s little wildlife

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20 year old photographer Kelley Smith’s inanimate animals make me feel all warm and fuzzy.

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Snarkitecture Transforms A Museum Into A Beach With A Ball Pit Filled With 1 Million Plastic Balls That You Can Swim In

Snarkitecture - The Beach Snarkitecture - The Beach Snarkitecture - The Beach Snarkitecture - The Beach

If you can’t get to a beach this summer, then you will be thankful for design duo Snarkitecture‘s new installation at the National Building Museum in Washington DC. The space is filled with 1 million translucent polystyrene balls in a massive wading pool, the floor is carpeted and scattered with deck chairs and beach umbrellas, inviting the beach goers to enjoy a day reading, wading, or playing paddle ball. There is even a summery snack bar available selling popcorn, candy, chocolate bars and soda pop. Every Wednesday the Museum offers different events where the snack bar will also offer bar service.

The Beach is a part of the program the Museum likes to offer each year – they dedicate the 10,000 square foot space to a gimmicky exhibition that will draw the crowds. And this year the honor went to Snarkitecture to produce something that would entertain the masses. Established by Alex Mustonen and Daniel Arsham, Snarkitecture is a design studio that focuses on minimal and intelligent design solutions, not only for spaces, but for objects as well. Drawing their name from Lewis Carroll’s The Hunting of The Snark, the team like a challenge and enjoy re-imagining existing objects and architecture. The poem describes an “impossible voyage of an improbable crew to find an inconceivable creature”, and Mustonen and Arsham take on this idea quite literally. They state their mission as:

Snarkitecture’s approach focuses on the viewer’s experience and memory, creating moments of wonder and interaction that allow people to engage directly with their surrounding environment. By transforming the familiar into the extraordinary, Snarkitecture makes architecture perform the unexpected. (Source)

The duo have been responsible for some very clever installations in many different spaces. You can check out their back catalog here. Or take your bathing suit and towel and head to their artificial paradise. The Beach is open until September 7. (Via Washingtonian)

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Noa Raviv’s 3D-Printed Dresses Make Math Look Good

Noa Raviv -3D-Printed Dresses

Noa Raviv - 3D-Printed Dresses

Noa Raviv - Design

Noa Raviv - Design

Designer Noa Raviv‘s “Hard Copy” collection has been bending space-time as well as turning heads all over the fashion world. Raviv revs fashion up into high tech: She uses 3D printing technology to create the vectors, grids, and curved polygons that act as the centerpieces of her futuristic dresses.

At first glance, her collection looks like something Escher would come up with if he had gone into outer space — and learned to put the pedal to the metal on a sewing machine. Raviv’s 3D-printed dresses utilize negative space and evocative bold lines that abruptly end, a trajectory to nowhere. Some mark outlines around the stoic models, almost reminiscent of cut-out paper dolls.

If you were to describe Raviv’s designs as purely brainy, though, that wouldn’t be entirely correct either. Her pieces are mash-ups of the classical and the plugged-in modern, organic yet precisely calculated. The recurring hollow grid pattern seems to inevitably draw a comparison to wire frame mannequins, perhaps implying that the work is incomplete with the wearer, who — in this case — gazes archly from amidst blossoming toruses and geometric anemones.

According to Raviv, she wanted to explore “the tension between the real and the virtual, between 2D and 3D.” After having won the 2014 Finy Leitersdorf Prize for her creative efforts, it would seem that her experiment was certainly a triumph.

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