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The 3D Graffiti Of Peeta

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The murals of graffiti artist Peeta definitely, and nearly literally, stand out.  Peeta uses a a familiar style peculiar to street art murals and tags.  However, using careful perspective and shading, he’s able to create the illusion of depth.  His work seems to twist and wind just above the wall’s surface.  While Peeta does also create sculptural versions of his street art inspired work, the images featured here are entirely two dimensional.  [via]

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Jamie Vasta RePaints Caravaggio In Glitter

 

Jamie Vasta’s  masterfully accomplished paintings may look like traditional chiaroscuro but they are in fact covered in shiny, shimmering glitter. Vasta has taken the painterly arts to new altitudes with her paintings in glitter. Her insouciant medium is fine-tuned to accentuate narrative.

Here series After Caravaggio, a contemporary reframing of Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio‘s historic paintings in homage to the great master on the 400th anniversary of his death, (1573 – 1610). Vasta gathers friends and colleagues as muse for her ambitious recasting of Caravaggio’s famous paintings. In rethinking such paintings as Giuditte e Oloferne, 1599, and Deposizione, 1602, Vasta composed her coterie with the props of today, turning gender, dress, and environment on end. The intention of the original comes forward, no heraldry of aristocracy, but an emancipation of the peasantry, under hot theater lights of course.

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Phil Robson Turns Sneakers Into Clever Insect Designs

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Australian graphic designer Filfury (Phil Robson) is a sneaker freak, and it shows in his latest images. He takes photographic details of bright and colorful sports shoes and re-imagines them as new intriguing shapes. His series of images include different objects such as butterflies, beetles, skulls, bats, body organs and guns. Robson takes the textures, patterns and characteristics form classic sneakers like Adidas Originals Superstar, the Air Jordan 4 Retro, and the Reebok Shaq Attack, and chops them up. Threaded shoelaces become teeth in the jaw of a skull; breathable mesh turn into wings of a dragonfly; the Adidas stripes morph into the wings of a bat; the toes of a sneakers are now the body part of an insect.

After collaborating with many many corporate brands such as Nike Basketball, Adidas, Reebok and Sneaker Pimps, Robson is a pro at creating sharp, modern graphics. He has been featured on many top artist lists, and is definitely a talent to track. You can see more of his streamlined aesthetic here on his Instagram feed. (Via Design Faves)

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Aaron Blecha for KUR


Welcome to the World of Kur! from Aaron Blecha on Vimeo.
As usual, I have found more evidence that Scandinavians live in a clean, brightly colored world of smart design and cute concepts. Animator Aaron Blecha recently created this commercial for KUR, a Danish organic food company. What I like is that the entire animation is styled around the Kur brand seed shape (the teardrop.) This airs on TV, you guys. Our budweiser booby girl commercials look pretty bleak in comparison to this hypercolored world of dancing ants, happy crabs and record loving birds.

Aaron Blecha has some other lovely animations & illustrations as well.

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Trevor Christensen Captures The Reactions Of His Subjects Seeing Him Nude

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Utah photojournalist Trevor Christensen‘s latest photographic project Nude Portraits is not what it sounds like. He has come up with a clever twist on the usual relationship between photographer and subject and the normal practices of taking photographs. Toying with the idea of himself being naked, taking photos of people fully clothed, Christensen was intrigued by the idea enough to follow it through. He started out by taking snaps of his girlfriend in the kitchen while in the buff, and had continuing doubts about the direction he was going in. Feeling as if it was unnatural, or definitely not normal for a photographer to work in a state of undress, he pursued the activity further to see just what he could capture on the other side of the lens.

By creating a memorable experience for his subjects, he is able to record a variety of reactions and emotions, revealed only in this unique set up. People range from laughing awkwardly, to averting their eyes, to being quietly stern, mildly bemused, or completely unfazed. His project has turned out to be a comprehensive and interesting study into different individual’s and societies’ attitudes toward nudity, personal space and the borders between public and private.

Throughout the process Christensen is exposed and vulnerable, but sees it as a necessary tool to ease the tension between artist and muse, and to level the playing field – where everyone is just as nervous as each other. In one case he enters the domestic space of Kendal, a gay Mormon man and what follows is indeed interesting. For Christensen, he is very confronted by this particular photo and worries he is taking advantage of some one who is too uncomfortable with the situation.

He says his main aim is to show people something they have seen or experienced before, and is worth seeing again. He wants his models to go back to that place they were in during the portrait and to feel those same things once more. Check out more images on his Instagram account, and an interview with him here.

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Stefanie Gutheil’s Paintings Are About to Lose It

The work of Stefanie Gutheil is a wonderful mess.  Her current exhibit at the Mike Weiss gallery has the atmosphere of the precise moment a party becomes a riot.  Gutheil’s paintings incorporate fleshy globs of oil and acrylic paint, fabric, glitter, hair, and fur.  The seemingly turbid materials match the paintings’ libidinous subject matter.  Even some of the paintings frames  only seem to exist in order to be defied – cat’s tails, pants, hats all push past gilded frames and off the canvas.  In what she portrays and how she portrays it, Gutheil’s work pinpoints a curious place precisely between fun and horror – the moment before the last finger loses its grip.

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A Delicious Carpet Made Out Of Sugar

The ephemeral installation Tapis de sucre (Sugar Carpet ) by Aude Moreau at Smack Mellon blocks out the majority of the gallery restricting visitors to the perimeter of the space. The delicate installation is comprised of 2 tons of refined white sugar meticulously spread into an oversized carpet embellished with Persian rug motifs. Referring to domestic comfort, the use of refined sugar within the gallery’s industrial space also aims to spotlight the overlooked and undervalued process of production.

“The adjective “refined” equally defines the matter transformed by the industrial purification process which produces the sugar’s whiteness, and the objects and attitudes selected within a cultural hierarchisation process. Through a use of the trompe-l’oeil, this installation refers back to our ambiguous adherence to a domestic comfort which systematically evacuates the realities of production.” (via)

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Street Artist Pejac Tricks The Eye With 3D Paintings That Seamlessly Blend Into Pre-Existing Architecture

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During a recent trip to Istanbul, Spanish artist Pejac completed a series of three murals in Üsküdar. Titled “Lock, Poster and Shutters,” each piece has been meticulously painted and employs a trompe-l’oeil technique to suggest three-dimensionality. Through painted-on shadows and methods of forced perspective, Pejac renders realistic architectural elements, including a keyhole receding into a stone wall, a ‘poster’ of a lancet window, and unlatched shutters framing a small, intricately patterned screen.

In order to impeccably blend each piece onto its architectonic canvas, Pejac utilizes lifelike, subdued hues—namely black, white, grey, and gold. To further evoke realism, the artist paints each object true to size, and even creates illusions of elemental exposure through synthetic discoloration and signs of tarnish. Echoing the existing imperfections apparent on each façade—including chipped paint, subtle cracks, and accumulated dirt—Pejac’s murals simultaneously trick the eye and call attention to the innate potential that surrounds us on a daily basis.

In an interview with Société Perrier, Pejac notes his recurring “intention to not only play with the concept but with the very perception of reality.” And, if “Lock, Poster and Shutters” is any indication, his playing proves successful.

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