Get Social:

Michael Salter Recycles Styrofoam Into Giant Robots

905UpUK6c828czzjynAWkBTGHOBcbFeamichael salter sculpture

A digital arts/new media professor at The University Of Oregon, has found a clever, new way to recycle Styrofoam. He builds gigantic robots out of it. The robots are massive and according to artist Michael Salter, reflects the local streets he sees everyday. It’s not the livelier sections,  but the mundane, plain parts which inspire him to create. It’s a bit hard to see the connection to this statement because there is nothing plain or boring about his Styrobots. Perhaps what the artist means is that they embrace quiet, domestic scenes reminiscent of these faceless places, which is true.

Exhibited in about 20 museums to date, the Styrobots can stand 16 inches to 22 feet high.  Various displays have shown them upright, sitting, holding hands with a tiny friend, surrounded by a smaller group or headless and torn apart. The standing bots embody characteristics mirroring the lead character in The Iron Giant. For those not familiar, the animated movie centers around a giant war robot who crash lands in a small town and befriends a young boy.  The Styrobots have the same gentle giant quality displayed in the movie.

Salter finds his material through donations.  Styrofoam is primarily used for packing but can be utilized as pipe insulation and preventing roads from freezing over. The material itself, polystyrene is extremely flammable and carcinogenic. When lit, it has the capacity of releasing 57 different kinds of chemical by-products.  (faithistorment)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Monika Horčicová’s Cyclical 3D-Printed Skeletal Sculptures Pair Mortality And Infinity

Monika Horčicová - polyurethan resin, 3D print, metal Monika Horčicová - lukoprene Monika Horčicová -  plaster composite
Monika Horčicová - 3D print,  polyurethane resin

There is an undeniable sense of morbidity that pervades Czech artist Monika Horčicová’s meticulous replicas of skeletal parts, but to call them simply morbid is to take away from their staggering beauty. Fused together and crafted through cutting edge 3D-printing technology and polyester resin casts, Horčicová merges bones into everything from running wheel-like statues to kaleidoscopic patchworks, each piece rooted in a mesmerizingly acute understanding of our complex skeletal system. Originally from Prague, Horčicová now lives in Brno where she attends the Faculty of Fine Arts at Brno University of Technology. The mathematical arrangements in Horčicová’s pieces, where hip bones can merge perfectly into an open fan of legs and ribcages fit snugly within one another, serve as surreal reminders of the deeply complicated framework that makes up each of our bodies.

Some of Horčicová’s pieces also stand as signifiers of mortality, such as Relikviář, in which 3D-printed pelvises, skulls and more are packed into neat boxes within a black metal display case. Here, they assume a more medical, typified presence, as most bones do when under examination and study, as Horčicová makes clear in her exquisite reproduction. The mutated forms Horčicová’s skeletal constructions take on are mesmerizing and vivid reminders of our own mortality, presented brilliantly within a cycle of infinite possibility.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Santtu Mustonen

Santtu Mustonen

 

Coming to us from Finland, Santtu Mustonen brings together illustration and animation in a wonderfully bizarre manner. We at B/D are totally digging his “slightly moving illustrations”!

 

P.S. The second animation after the jump isn’t working properly (it had to be resized), so be sure to check out his website!

 

Currently Trending

Kurt Lam

Hong Kong based  Kurt Lam’s site says that he is a fashion illustrator but his portfolio is full of illustrations that reference art nouveau, art deco, japanese scroll painting, and various modes of abstraction that defy traditional fashion illustration tropes and push the boundaries of the genre.

Currently Trending

Poster Company


I’m not exactly sure of how I feel about these digital expulsions by the Poster Company. I think my reaction came in 3 stages: first oscillating between questioning the validity of their artfulness, then awe at the convoluted jungle of pixels, then back to confusion again.

Currently Trending

David Maisel’s Mines

David Maisel’s aerial photographs of open mines questions  how human activity transforms land through industrial effort. Although beautifully photographed these images are reminders of how we destroy and pollute our planet for money and power.

Currently Trending

The Dish Dioramas of Caroline Slotte

Caroline Slotte Sculpture 9

Caroline Slotte Sculpture 7 Caroline Slotte 10

The medium of artist Caroline Slotte is a familiar one.  Dishes commonly found in homes and thrift shops become surprising dioramas.  The simple images usually hidden under food become multilayered narratives.  The many memories associated with family meals, dinner parties, milestone celebrations aren’t lost on Slotte.  She says of her medium choice:

” Objects in our private sphere stir feelings in us and connect us to our history. They are tangible reminders of the past, of our own life story, and that of the family. In this way the most humble object can function as a key to the past, as a key to our inner.”

Currently Trending

Cheuk Lu Lo’s Mysterious PhotographsOf Stylishly Shampooed Hair

Cheuk Lun Lo - Photography Cheuk Lun Lo - Photography Cheuk Lun Lo - Photography Cheuk Lun Lo - Photography

Photographer Cheuk Lun Lo‘s series of hair in media rinse is stylish and playful. The hair is teased into tangles and swirls, white shampoo tinting the curves like seafoam. Some of the spikier specimens begin looking like sea creatures if you stare at them too long; another is reminiscent of a hedgehog. One photo, an unassuming, almost shy curl of hair, looks like something you might find in a shower drain — a big cowlick, basically.

According to My Modern Met, Lo’s photo series first appeared in the Chinese magazine Numero Magazine. The photo series in a way defies conventional standards of beauty: the meticulous grooming, the impeccably ironed clothes, the put-together and perfectly powdered face. Instead, Lo’s photos show that the unusual can be captivating; pinned to a dark background, these half-washed yet fully conceived hair styles are mysterious and lovely in a way that perhaps wouldn’t be possible for a finished product with a shiny veneer. (via My Modern Met)

Currently Trending