Get Social:

Colorful Pizzas Aren’t The Kind You’d Ever Want To Eat

black-pizza-1 black-pizza-9 black black-pizza-6

The iconic pizza pie gets a fun twist in this series titled Pizza Is the New Black by the Paris design studio called Black Pizza. It features 10 different iterations of the dish, all set in a different color and that use some food as well as inanimate objects. Designers had the help of Chef Julie Bassett with support from Erwan Fichou, and together the team came up with “pizzas” that included pacifiers, ping pong balls, iPhone cases, and more on them. The dough was even dyed to match the color scheme. It all results in these visually appetizing images that are beautiful if not slightly repulsive.

Black Pizza describes the project, saying, “In a riotous culinary color scheme, Black Pizza pays tribute to the pizza, the symbol of sharing and pop culture.” The entire project only took a couple of days. (Via Miss Asphixia and UFunk)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Jackie Dives Documents Her Brother’s Recovery From Heroin Addiction

Jackie Dives - Photography

60mg methadone + heroin.

Jackie Dives - Photography

Jackie and her brother together. On his first day in the world, and a few years later.

Jackie Dives - Photography

Sober.

Jackie Dives - Photography

60mg methadone + heroin.

Jackie Dives is a Vancouver-based portrait and documentary photographer who has bravely followed her brother’s recovery from heroin addiction. The project began nearly a year ago, when her brother asked her to capture his progress. Jackie agreed, explaining she “wanted to do it as a record for him, hopefully [as] a way for him to remember the severity of his addiction, and prevent him from relapsing.” The images are unfailing in their honesty, capturing fluctuations of strength, hope, pain, and vulnerability. We see him smiling, looking healthy, and sitting beside his girlfriend (who bravely accepted that Jackie take her photograph post-breast augmentation, thus adding another dimension of fearlessness and candidness to the series). In other photos, he looks troubled, his face lined with pain and sadness. The emotion emanating from these images is palpable, and even though Jackie’s brother may be unknown to us, his portraits of struggle and hope inspire a profound sense of empathy and acceptance for individuals enduring the trials of drug addiction and recovery.

What makes this series even more significant is the fact that, for Jackie, her love-infused photographic ambitions began with her brother. Eight years his senior, Jackie began documenting him as soon as he was born; as she writes in her Artist Statement, “Because of our age gap, photography was a realistic way for us to connect that didn’t require us to have much in common, other than being in the same room.” He was not an easy subject; “he moved fast,” and was uninterested in the art she was trying to create. As a result, Jackie became adept at working on the fly, less concerned about refinement and perfection, and interested instead in snapping the purity of a moment. These experiences documenting her brother have developed the core of her artistic objectives and philosophies; while working in the fields of family, event, and travel photography, true portraiture is always her primary focus:

“What’s important to me is simply a moment in the life of my subject. It is not forced or artificial. I want to show my subject truly. […] Ultimately, it’s about letting people continue to be themselves, and not stopping the moment, but letting it flow on, and being adaptable to it. I only want to capture what is actually happening, and in doing that, take a true portrait.” (Source)

Visit Jackie’s website to see more images from this powerful series, as well as many other beautiful portraits and projects. Her Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook page are also up-to-date with her most recent and ongoing work, so be sure to check out those as well. More images of her brother’s recovery after the jump.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Life Of Cats: An Exhibition Exploring Japan’s Historical Obsession With Cats

Life of Cats, Exhibition – woodblock prints Life of Cats, Exhibition – woodblock prints Life of Cats, Exhibition – woodblock prints Life of Cats, Exhibition – woodblock prints

In the age of the internet, we are used to seeing cats, cat videos, and cat-related memes permeating our social media. But delve into the archives of art history and you’ll see that people have always been a little obsessed with cats (it was no secret in ancient Egypt). In a show held at Manhattan’s Japan Society last spring, over 120 artworks—consisting largely of ukiyo-e prints from the Edo period—were exhibited that explored Japan’s own infatuation with their feline companions. Most of the pieces were on loan from the Hiraki Ukiyo-e Foundation and the rest were gathered from collections around the US.

The show was divided into five sections: “Cats and People,” “Cats as People,” “Cats versus People,” “Cats Transformed,” and “Cats and Play.” The animals were represented in a variety of ways—sometimes in the cute, domesticated contexts we recognize from the internet, and sometimes in courtly (and even eroticized) scenarios. Many are anthropomorphized to partake in human activities, from argumentative social gatherings to traditional dances. In other prints, they take on a more sinister appearance, conjured as muses for cryptic samurai duals. Coupled with nude or reclining women, cats take on a sensual symbolism.

The exhibition ended last June, but you can learn more about it on the Japan Society website, and there is a video tour available here. (Via Hyperallergic)

Currently Trending

Mitch Griffiths’ Paintings Mix Old Master Technique With Contemporary Culture

British artist Mitch Griffiths‘ work is inspired by the light and the composition of the Old Masters, but his context and content depict issues that concern modern culture. In his work, Griffiths addresses the disposable nature of contemporary culture by immortalizing this transience with the perceived permanence of the painting medium. His figurative portraits are dark and foreboding and often turbulent. The drama depicted in his paintings, though contemporary, feels universal, historical, and personal. Though many of his images resonate with religious iconography, the “symbolism reflects a modern quest for redemption from the overriding self-obsession and consumerism of contemporary society, with its vanity and greed, addictions and needless suffering.”

Currently Trending

Braden Labonte

Dark paintings by Braden Labonte.

Currently Trending

Magic Eye: Ari Fararooy’s Surreal Self Portraits Made With Mirrors Will Play Tricks On Your Eyes

Ari Fararooy - mirror portraits Ari Fararooy - mirror portraits Ari Fararooy - mirror portraits Ari Fararooy - mirror portraits

Just like you shouldn’t trust everything you read on the internet, you shouldn’t believe everything you see. L.A based special effects artist Ari Fararooy‘s latest photographic series is a perfect example of this. Using a tripod, mirrors, a self timer and ‘a few digital manipulations’ he has created a very surreal, and futuristic set of self portraits. He went to Joshua Tree National Park wanting to carry on his creative twists on the latest ‘selfies’ craze.

The goal was to experiment with reflections and explore the various ways I could creatively photograph myself. (Source)

He also had this aim in mind while attending the Burning Man festival in 2014. After he found himself in the strange environment that is the desert, surrounded by many creative people, he began clicking his shutter and coming up with some very inventive camera tricks, involving glow sticks, long exposures, strange perspectives and wide angles. You can see that series here.

His photographs are just as surreal as a Dali painting, but he uses modern technologies and a different set of skills. Be sure to see the extent of his talents to transform the ordinary into the extraordinary on his Facebook and Instagram pages. (Via Fubiz)

Currently Trending

Haunting Photographs Of Abandoned Toy Factories

Abandoned Toy Factories

Via Bosure

Abandoned Toy Factory

Isla de las Munecas, or the Island of the Dolls

Photographs of abandoned toy factories are haunting. Taken by various photographers around the world, we see what’s happened after production has stopped and employees stop showing up to work. Some places are left in mid-production, while others have been ransacked by graffiti. In other places, they were defeated by nature.

Illustrating a range of factory conditions, the most unnerving photos are ones that depict these places as ghost towns. They feature cracked doll heads, broken doll arms, and soiled teddy bears. There is an air of mystery about them, and beg the question of, “what happened?” Why did they suddenly pick and leave?

What makes these photographs unnerving is the juxtaposition of toys and abandonment. We think of things like dolls and bears as being innocent. They signify childhood, a time in our lives that shouldn’t be so dark. Instead, we see toys having to face harsh realities of time, wind, snow, and more. Nothing depicts this better than the Isla de las Munecas, or the Island of the Dolls (above). While actually a floating garden, this space of land is occupied by several hundred dolls that have severed heads, limbless bodies and with empty eye-sockets. It was originally conceived as a memorial for a girl that was drowned in a canal, but has since fallen in disrepair. (Via io9)

Currently Trending

eBoy Interview

Digital Design Collective eBoy Discusses their Limited Edition BD Apparel Shirt “Jerk”

The digital design collective eBoy, comprised of Steffen Sauerteig, Svend Smital and Kai Vermehr recently sat down with Beautiful/Decay to answer a few questions about their recent limited edition shirt, “Jerk.” eBoy’s design was one of our most technical cut and sews ever, taking months to produce! Only 250 of these exclusive shirts were produced and are selling out fast- visit our Online Shop to purchase one!

Read on to garner some of eBoy’s pixellated points of interest and inspiration behind their work and Beautiful/Decay Apparel design.

BD: Can you talk a little bit about your design collective and how it got started?

eBoy: We started in 1998 with eboy.com. The concept was to only show our free projects and art. The first feature about eBoy was in a Japanese book, from there the level of awareness for eBoy grew steadily.

eBoy design

eBoy design

BD: Can you describe your aesthetic, how you became interested in the pixel-by-pixel look, and what you think it says about the current visual digital climate today?

eBoy: One of our previous projects was a digital picture book series called Ogdig(c)’s, which was distributed on diskettes. It was that project that made us start to work for the screen only and use pixels as the technique of choice. When we went online with eBoy.com it was justnatural to go on using this technique.

eBoy work for Coke

eBoy work for Coke

BD: What are some of your inspirations, whether visual, musical, ideological…?

eBoy: ffffound.com … TV Shows like The Wire, Sopranos …

BD: What was the inspiration behind creating the Eboy shirt?

eBoy: Northern Irish murals!

Example of Northern Irish propaganda Mural

BD: What was the process like of creating your artwork in a t-shirt form, what were the most enjoyable parts, or most challenging?

eBoy: We were thinking of the T-shirt as a house with awkward window positions.

To learn more about eBoy, visit their B/D Artist Profile or the eBoy website.

Currently Trending