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Only 45 Copies of Future Perfect Book left!

 

That’s right folks! Beautiful/Decay: Future Perfect is down to only 45 copies. This book will sell out this week so if you’ve been holding back on placing your order do it now. You can get your copy of this exquisitely designed Book: 6 for only $20 or buy a year long subscription for only $39.95 and get 3 books for $13 including shipping!

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Diddo Velema

Diddo

 

With over 12 years of experience, designer and art director Diddo Velema has worked with a diverse range of clients, such as LABORATORIVM and Modernista!. Having taught at the School of Arts in Utrecht, Netherlands, and having contributed to various international projects like Frank Gehry’s Sentosa and UNESCO’s ICAT project in Costa Rica, Diddo just recently started up his own studio in Amsterdam. He aspires to blur the boundaries among art, design, architecture, fashion, photography, product design, etc. as often as possible. And he does it so phenomenally!

 

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Peony Yip

What musings I have read by Peony Yip – aka The White Deer – express her true passion for drawing, something she has pursued, as she says, because it is the only thing she knows. The Hong Kong native of only 21 honestly asserts that she is no professional artist, instead describing herself as just a recent college graduate, broke, and looking to freelance a bit. Of course, the young woman can claim what she would like, but I think her talent is undeniable. Amateur or not, I have been loving her varied works. Take a look at some of her creations here, and maybe show this up-and-coming artist a bit of love after the jump.

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Patty Carroll’s Ghostly Women Draped In Fabric

Patty Carroll - Photography

Patty Carroll - Photography

Patty Carroll - Photography

Patty Carroll - Photography

Patty Carroll photographs women who hide behind fabric. In her series, Anonymous Women: Draped, she features figures sitting and standing, all shrouded in luscious fabrics, rugs, and more. These women are invisible, meant to convey the idea that as we perfect the space of our home, it can fuse with our identity. Carroll’s choice in fabrics harkens another era, and look like they could be in the house of a grandparent. The Nuclear family of the 1950’s and 1960’s comes to mind in her work, when women’s roles were often domestically confined. Carroll writes about the series and the inspiration and implications behind it, stating:

I am addressing the double edge of domesticity; the home as a place of comfort, or conversely, a place where decoration camouflages one’s individuality to the point of claustrophobia. The draperies in these photographs act as both a visual cue as well as a literal interpretation of over-identification/obsession! While my direct sources for this series come from furnishing a home, as well as remembering the nuns in their habits while growing up, this series also references draped statues from the Renaissance, women wearing the burka, the Virgin Mary, ancient Greek and Roman dress, priests’ and judges’ robes, among others. I believe everyone has a hidden identity formed by personal traditions, memories, and ideas that are cloaked from the outer world. Cultivating these inner psychological, emotional and intellectual worlds is perhaps our greatest challenge as people, wherever we come from or wherever we live. (Via I need a guide)

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Olivia Knapp’s Drawings Are Still Lifes On Acid

Olivia Knapp- Ink Drawing Olivia Knapp- Ink Drawing Olivia Knapp- Ink DrawingOlivia Knapp- Ink Drawing

These ink drawings, saturated with detail, are the masterwork of Seattle artist Olivia Knapp. Knapp utilizes classic shading techniques from the Baroque period, putting a real spin on the classic still life. At first glance, her work appears to be a mishmash of objects borrowed from an antiquated medical book. Knapp orchestrates a hyper-stylized version of everyday elements within American culture: a Fruit Loops box, some headphones, items rigidly anchored to the 21st century American lexicon. In these drawings, they appear in a different light, making the items far more mysterious and surreal than we know them to be. The black crosshatching weaves in an inexplicable amount of detail, with forms that are tight from a distance and dissolve into their own internal network of lines when viewed in detail.

Her work stretches leisurely throughout the frame, exhibiting a sort of spaciousness that is vastly composed of the winding structures of arteries stemming from the heart, or twisted plants and snakes. The arteries of a heart grip a spoon to eat a bowl of cereal, the brain hovers, listening to music; often what could have been a normal picture reduced to its mere elements, the heart the symbolic structure indicating man, or human, yet everything contorts into everything else like Salvador Dali’s melting clocks. The marriage of a new symbol presented with an old technique is nothing new, but Knapp has found a way to express it that is entirely bizarre, interesting, and unique.

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Kimsooja’s Mirrored Installation Transforms Classic Greenhouse Into Psychedelic Rainbow Room

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Perhaps the fascination for artists utilizing chrome and mirror in their works is the increasing divide between seeing ourselves more and more via social media, yet understanding ourselves less. This is particularly evident in the work of New York-based Korean multidisciplinary artist Kimsooja, which often deals with the self-perception and the self and the other. In her installation To Breathe – A Mirror Woman at the Palacio de Cristal, Parque del Retiro, in Madrid, Kimsooja transformed a classic greenhouse by removing everything and replacing it with a mirrored floor. Next, the Tague, South Korean-born artist used a translucent, light-diffracting film to coat the windows, which cause an array of naturally occurring rainbows, which were in turn continuously reflected by a mirrored surface that covered the entire floor. Like many of her projects, an audio pairing accompanied the visuals. Visitors would experience a recording of Kimsooja breathing, enhancing the contemplative yet personal and relatable mystery of the installation.

Taken from Kimsooja’s description of the project, “Outside light filters through the glass of the pavilion and reflects off the diffraction film. It diffuses into rainbow spectrums, transforming the external panorama seen from within the palace. The resulting effect is that the entire structure as well as the rays of colour reflecting off the mirrored floor. Natural light, colour, and sound are all ethereal elements within the empty space. The artist’s breathing from the performance, The Weaving Factory, bounces off the mirrors and fills the entire building to intermix with it, breaking down barriers of inside and outside, self and other, and reality and fantasy.”

Kimsooja’s most recent project most recently wrapped the Korean Pavilion with a similar film treatment at the 2013 Venice Art Biennale. (via myampgoesto11 and colossal)

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Artist Rachel Dien Creates Delicate Fossils From Flowers

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London based artist Rachel Dein creates fossils from everyday objects. She allows herself to preserve tangible pieces of the present as keepsakes for the future. The simplicity of the work adds to its honesty and preciousness. Dien studied as a propmaking apprentice at the English National Opera, giving her quite a extensive knowledge of object creation. Her “fossil” project began with the desire to preserve a sentimental bouquets of flowers. Her process has now blossomed into a practice of creating beautifully adorned tiles. She takes cherished, perhaps fleeting, objects and allows them to exist eternally. Her work is created with a fairly basic form of casting, yet allows her to capture delicate and intricate details. She learned the process from a glass blowing class in art college, during which she was told to press shapes into wet sand and pour molten glass over the impression. After that, she began experimenting with clay, plaster and paint, and found her way to the tile making process she uses today. Each of the molds she creates can only be used once, and therefore each piece is a unique, personalized object. Her work is undoubtedly graceful, and in a slight sense, almost whimsical. The process of casting has a long history, and despite her creating in the preset, her objects tend to feel as if they have come from a deep rooted past, truly capturing the feel of being a “fossil.” (via deMilked)

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Jim Gaylord opens tonight @ Gregory Lind

Jim Gaylord will be exhibiting new work at Gregory Lind gallery, opening Sat. Feb 5th and running til March 14th. Building on his past work as a filmmaker, Gaylord’s work cultivates and abstracts imagery from special effects and action sequences in the movies. With titles like “Study (Braveheart + Jackass: the Movie + Cloverfield + Last of the Mohicans + Home Alone 2), 2009,” Gaylord reveals the humor behind popular culture through the lens of movies.

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