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Tyler Spangler’s Spooky Neon Portrait Remixes

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Tyler Spangler’s digital collages rehash old portraits to uncanny effect. He mixes faces like batter or melts them like wax. Of course this would be much more gruesome were it not for the joyful neon colours he employs. His artwork has the distinct aesthetic of the internet age. Wild patterns and powerful colours are overload for the eye, providing a high level of stimulation pretty much required, now, to incite a strong reaction in the viewer.

In some cases, the overabundance of pattern and colour has the viewer process less, or otherwise require us to take much more time to do it. When there is so much to take in, the options are either to skim over it, or take much more time to engage with it. Spangler has a great range of intensity. Some of his works have 5 or less elements, where other have 20 or more different textures.

Spangler works digitally, and creates all of his graphics himself. Whereas in aesthetic the works can be called collage, he uses a minimum of recycled imagery. In this way, Spangler is more like a painter than a collage artist, creating his own imagined imagery. He is a digital painter easily able manipulate familiar imagery. (Via Hi Fructose)

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Jerry Kearns – New Work

Jerry Kearns’ new work meditates on the construction of images post-9/11. The stark blue sky found in all of the paintings sets the mood as surreal and stands in for the strange blue sky behind the Twin Towers after the attack. Kearns explores various ways of representing the present body by subverting notions of masculinity and strength with both feminine and androgynous signifiers.

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Crazy Love

 

Crazy Love is probably one of the more bizarre documentaries i’ve seen in a while. Here’s a great review of the film by Eric D.  Snider.

 
Ideally, you would watch “Crazy Love” without knowing anything about it beyond what’s contained in these first few paragraphs. It is a documentary about two New Yorkers who met and fell in love in the 1950s, and the turbulence their relationship has endured since then. It’s a bizarre, riveting, and outrageously original story, and it’s 100 percent true. You’ll enjoy it more if you’re surprised by what happens, which you won’t be if you continue reading this review, or any other review or summary of the film, including the one-line plot outline at IMDb.com.

 

I would love to leave it at that, but it’s impossible to review the film without talking about some of its basic elements. And the fact is, despite knowing some of the story’s more jaw-dropping developments beforehand, I was still riveted and surprised by the movie. Reading a review won’t ruin it for you; you’ll just be slightly less flabbergasted when you see it.

 

“Crazy Love” does not mince words about its protagonists: These people are not right in the head, and their love for one another defies all reason. But then again, one is compelled to consider, doesn’t all love defy reason? Isn’t its irrationality part of what makes it true love?

(Here’s where you should stop reading and go see the film.) 

 

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Germinal Roaux

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I don’t know much about photographer Germinal Roaux because his Wikipedia page is in French, but just the fact that he has a Wikipedia page is good enough for me. Not to mention his lovingly rich black and white photos. They look like I could scoop them up with a butter knife and smooth them over my morning scone. From ballerinas to rock stars, Roaux wraps each of his images in his own special blend of spellbound.

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Jordan Wolfson’s Provocative And Sassy Female Life-Like Robot That Will Boss You Around

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An animatronic busty dancer lasciviously moves and converses with the public, speaking with a men’s voice and hyper sexual tones. The life like robot imagined and produced by Jordan Wolfson, dressed up with a leather dress and white thigh-high vinyl boots, sassily swivels her hips and watches her spectator through her dirty greenish mask. The dirt reveals the past of the robot; she has escaped from something but isn’t hurt; she’s here with us and she’s ready to put up her show. Like a real spectacle, the public is only allowed for a couple of minutes with the dancer.  A closed set, a twosome controled by an assertive and repetitive speech and a powerful vision.

Jordan Wolfson is interested in the strange. Therefore he is not focused on the meaning of his art. He is aware of the influence of You Tube and other social media platforms within its generation but he is fascinated by the power of images, the way they are thrown at us and the way we accept it, with or without consequences. The artist works in a non associative way, giving us a non judgmental rendering of his vision. Like his life in Los Angeles where he now resides, his pieces are intuitive and fictional. His concept and art statement has lead the public and the art world to label him as a provocative contemporary artist.
“I’m not telling anyone what to think. I don’t have that responsibility. I’m expressing myself. It’s as simple as that.” He uses art as a safe place where he can express, without fear, his traumas and anger.

Jordan Wolfson art work is exhibited as part of a group show at the Whitney Museum in New York until September 2015, and at the Serpentine Gallery in London this fall 2015

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Frederic Fluery’s Playful & Grotesque Drawings

Frederic Fluery lives and works in Dunkirk, France. His work remains playfull while dealing with zombies, human insides, and destruction. Fluery renders simplified characters in awkward situations.Like Daniel Clowes, his style slightly changes as his narratives shift. Frederic doesn’t hold on to a cast of characters for too long before switching gears which makes for an invigorating variety of characters and story lines.

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Thom Kerr

Thom KerrThom Kerr is best known as a fashion photographer, but his work is creatively well mixed. After studying Fine Arts with a Film Degree in Brisbane, Australia, Thom initially began as a writer and director. His diverse background is unique, yet is style is similar to that of Baz Luhrmann. Check out more of his amazing Sci-Fi series after the jump.

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Théo Gennitsakis’s Type Magic

Wonderfully inventive illustrated typography by artist, illustrator, graphic designer Théo Gennitsakis.

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