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Ben Frost

Ben Frost

Australian artist Ben Frost’s Lost in the Supermarket (now showing at Bout, a reference to The Clash song, remarks on the over stimulation, confusion and daily hypnosis we are trapped by, as we struggle to stand still on a buzzing psychedelic landscape of brands, identities and social demands.

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Erin M. Riley Weaves the Photos You Took Last Night

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Erin M. Riley takes the images that usually live on Snapchat, Tumblr, or the privacy of your own phone and translates them into tapestries. They are pictures you wouldn’t want your parents to see. They feature naked and half naked women, drug paraphernalia, used condoms, and more. In an interview with Arrested Motion, Riley states, “I try to take pictures of the condoms after I have sex, the pictures I send to people, pictures of tables at parties, substances & liquids that change the course of events.”

If broadcasted the world, these are the type of photos that would really embarrass someone. Riley takes time to translate these experiences into large, detailed, and colorful weavings completed on a loom. In the same interview, she goes on to say, “I am taking the time to recreate these images as physical tapestries, because these are the events and objects that are significant to me. Tapestry allows images to be given more time, for hookups to gel, for mistakes to be thought over, its a way to over analyze every detail.” This is a cathartic activity for the artist, who says that there is an ebb and a flow in her images over time. Sometimes, they will be more aggressive or explicit, then scale back. Riley says that it’s a reflection in her own life, and she’s open to sharing this with her viewers. Doing so gives the opportunity to start a dialogue with people who admire, question, and collect her work. She’s happy to have conversation with people who might not broach the subject without the help of her tapestries.

Part of the success of Riley’s work is the way it is produced. She combines two different worlds; weaving, an old art form that requires a lot of skill, and the digital age, one that is very focused on instant gratification and accessible by nearly everyone.

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Jörg Brüggemann’s Heavy Metal Fans

Jörg Brüggemann’s work captures the raw aesthetic behind the fans of heavy metal in order to illustrate the genre’s ability to unite the fans of it’s sound in order to create a unique culture, despite social, economic, or political differences. The photographs have been taken all around the world including Argentina, Austria, Brazil, Egypt, Germany, Indonesia, Malaysia, Switzerland and the USA.

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POW MARTINEZ

 

Pow Martinez goops on the paint in these quirky paintings.

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Earthy Concept Item Engages All Five Senses

 

Central Saint Martins MA candidates Anita Silva and Leslie Borg designed an incredibly creative interactive product for Icelandair entitled “_scape”. Inspired by a rock found in Iceland, _scape is a layered “book” containing “sounds, visuals, textures, scents and tastes” which can serve as a reminder of Iceland itself, or just a general internal escape. Intended to evoke lava rock and ice (two strong elements of the Icelandic landscape), the object is earthy-looking, meant to strongly contrast with the sterile environment of an airplane cabin. I’m not sure a flight time long enough to allow me to grow bored of interacting with _scape exists. (via)

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Sarah Illenberger


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In my recent Arcimboldo post, one of our readers mentioned his work reminded him of Sarah Illenberger. Well, I checked out her portfolio and was pleasantly surprised by her silly, girly, playful constructions, designed & created primarily for magazine/book editorial! Including, but not limited to a candy-construction that looks like a monster face and cacti that ahem, look like……..cacti.

 

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Antonia Gurkovska’s Trypophobia

Antonia Gurkovska just graduated from the MFA program at SAIC and already has already landed a solo exhibition in Chicago’s Kavi Gupta Gallery and is exhibiting in the Armory Show. She favors surfaces that are stapled and dripped, sticky, slippery and oozing, emulating dripping orifices; but they somehow remain extremely neat, hygienic, settling in even, grid-like formations. A variety of painting materials are layered thickly, then crudely sliced to reveal further layers beneath, so the paintings appear reductive rather than additive. Her bubble wrap pieces, neither sculpture nor painting, serve to both reiterate her aesthetic of ovular forms and invite a reversal of material reading, where the packaging product sheds its banal connotations and instead becomes a beautiful, bulging, golden grid.

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You Won’t Believe These Airy Dresses By Alasdair Thomson Are Carved From Marble

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Upon viewing the sculptor Alasdair Thomson’s flowing, dreamy garments, you might be transported to the sunlit meadows of a William-Adolphe Bouguereau painting filled with young, fresh-faced girls in flowing white sundresses. On second glance, however, the clothes reveal themselves to be carved from hard, cold marble. The artist, using hanging outfits borrowed from his friends as unusual muses, renders miraculously enlivened clothing from the durable material, dresses that seem to dance in the wind despite remaining entirely immobile.

Here, Thomson, who holds a Ph.D. in Art History from the University of Edinburg, reinterprets the Renaissance and classical treatment of marble; in the stead of Michelangelo’s strapping David or ancient tributes to mythological heroes, he presents simple, delicate, and feminine attire. The juxtaposition of soft content with sturdy material compels the viewer to consider deeper themes, and as these cottony sculptures hang convincingly from hangers, the everyday is elevated to a level as significant and moving as ancient mythologies. Notably, the clothes are also fetchingly modern; in the place of togas, Shine carves belted jumpers and strapless gowns.

While marble art historically has usually been used to express the powerful eroticism of both the male and female body, these hanging garments maintain a charming innocence. Seen in pale white and adorned with frills and ruffles, they wait to be inhabited by a body that will never arrive; limply, they fall and strain against the hanger. Indeed, the pieces are delightful, and viewers might be covetous them, if only they could actually be slipped over human bodies. (via Oddity Central and Colossal)

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