Get Social:

Adela Andea’s Otherworldly Light Installations

Adela_Andea_installation

Adela_Andea_installation

Adela_Andea_installation

Adela Andea’s light installations and sculptures seem otherworldly.  They almost feel organic, reminiscent of vivid underwater scenes, but the lights, wires and other tech that make them seem more like alien landscapes.  The Romanian-born, Texas-based artist seeks to explore the line between actuality and virtual reality.  Weaving LED and CCL lights with pulsing electrical components Andea creates installations that transport a viewer to a place where art becomes experience, and that experience is all encompassing.

Andea likes to think of her work as incorporating many layers of truth.  She embraces the possibility that there isn’t one reality, and her work strives to capture that notion visually. With the fast and overwhelming advancement of technology, Andea’s installations represent the dialogue between people and new technologies.  The desire for a viewer to have a personal experience with her work, but to also think about the way that information can be manipulated to form one’s notion of reality is the driving force behind her complex installations.

In her artist statement Andea writes: “The numerous transitions in my life made me think about the enormous capability of people to adapt to situations and even more, search for the new possibilities of personal development through inquisitive experiences.”  A witness to the Romanian Revolution in 1989, and eventually forced to immigrate to the United States in 1999, Andea is certainly qualified to make work that comments on the experience of experiences.

Her work is currently on view at the Texas Biennale, now through November 9th at the Blue Star Contemporary Art Museum in San Antonio, Texas.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Ian Pfaff


Ian Pfaff’s demo reel is a classic. In my mind, the guy nailed it. While partying really, really, hard while on spring break, Ian multitasks by writing, editing, directing, animating, building props, and making music. All around killer.

VIA ChangeTheThought

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Donna J. Wan’s Haunting Photos Of Suicide Destinations

wan-photo5

wan-photo1

wan-photo2

wan-photo3

Photographer Donna J. Wan’s ongoing series “Death Wooed Us” is gorgeous, unsettling, and deeply empathetic. “In 2011 after the birth of my daughter I developed a severe case of postpartum depression and considered taking my own life,” she writes in the description of the work, all photos taken in “suicide destinations”—places where people have taken their lives.

“Using research gathered from media reports, I found several locations in the Bay Area and travelled to them. I walked along the paths taken by these people before they ended their lives. Most of these photographs were taken from bridges, including the Golden Gate Bridge, one of the most well-known ‘suicide destinations,’ but also lesser-known beaches and overlooks. I purposely photographed from the perspective of looking up at the sky, down at the water or crags, or straight ahead but far away, thinking that these views might have resembled the ones seen by others moments before dying. Many of my images have a hazy and elusive quality, which I believe reflects the clouded state of mind of the suicidal.”

Suicide is such a sensitive subject. There are many people—probably the majority of people—who cannot imagine losing the will to live. Whether because of religious beliefs, or ties to family and friends, or just the innate need to stay alive, these people believe that they would never end their own lives. Then there are others, who have lived with pain and grief and the loss of hope. Those who, because of sickness of body or brain, struggle through every day. Once you have crossed this line, between life at all costs and death as a merciful end, the world never looks the same to you again. In Wan’s series, her experience is what makes the photos haunting and peaceful. She has looked into the cracks of her own soul, and that has enabled her to walk in the footsteps of those without hope and capture their last sights with kindness. The last view of a suicidal person could be macabre, an intrusion into someone else’s pain. These photos offer beauty, the acknowledgement of despair, and the desire for peace.

“There are some who may think that my photographs romanticize these places of death. I can understand that point of view, although that is not my intention. Death is not beautiful – in fact, jumping from a bridge 200 feet high is a very painful and violent way to die. Yet the sublimity of these places continues to lure people to them. I do not intend for my work to glorify the allure of these places. Instead, I hope that it may offer a glimpse into the minds of those who may have thought that dying by these beautiful places was a peaceful way to end their suffering.”

(via feature shoot)

Currently Trending

Book 4 Sneak Peak: Behind-the-scenes at the B/D Headquarters!

BD Book 4 Sneak Peak

We sent off Book 4 to the printers the other day, so we thought we’d give you a sneak peak of what we have in store for you. The above is a screen cap from an amazing collaboration between 26 artists from around the world. I don’t want to give away all the details for this project, but think of it as a Y2K version of one of the most classic art-based games. Confused? Good! Read on to see more behind-the-scenes tidbits….

Currently Trending

Music ID2

This stop motion video was mainly created out of yarn. It’s beautiful.

Currently Trending

Lucy Mcrae & Bart Hess


luckymcraebarthess1

 

Weird-beard grow your own crystal colored bath foam appendage fashion. Ephemeral bubble garments? Bizarre sculpture? Yes. Collaboration between Lucy Mcrae and Bart Hess.

 

Currently Trending

Mu Boyan’s Nude Sumo-Sized Bodies

Mu Boyan 1

Mu Boyan sculpture Mu Boyan sculpture3

These plump and curvy sculptures are the work of Chinese artist Mu Boyan. Using a variety of materials, Boyan’s sumo wrestler sized figures are sculpted into contexts that make use of the space and density of the large bodies. The rolls of fatty tissue are shiny and smooth, the positions of the bodies graceful and balanced, though almost completely consumed by their own densities. Boyan’s figures are vulnerable, and each figure’s bodily placement underscores the vastness of their large forms. The figures’ faces and bodies are soft and playful, almost cherubic, lending a familiar and comfortable feel to the experience of the sculptures, though the figures are placed into vulnerable positions. According to Boyan, this series reflects his exploration and fascination with the depiction of Chinese political symbolism in art. (via exhibition-ism)

Currently Trending

Matthias Heiderich’s Candy Colored Photographs

No these aren’t digital illustrations for a children’s book but the work of young self taught German photographer Matthias Heiderich. These razor sharp images may be minimal in composition but they pack a powerful punch of color that will make you hungry for cotton candy and a trip to the circus. (via feature shoot)

Currently Trending