Get Social:

Mallory Morrison Captures The Frozen Beauty Of Women Floating And Falling In Water

Mallory Morrison- PhotographMallory Morrison- Photograph Mallory Morrison- PhotographMallory Morrison- Photograph

These stunning images come from photographer Mallory Morrison‘s latest series, FOG, and combine the unearthly nature of life underwater with the beauty of the human form. An experienced underwater photographer, Morrison works with models to push the limits of what is possible.

Poetic and succinct, her artist statement provides further explanation in the impetus behind her work on this series:

Our path is not always clear.  Finding our way through life, figuring out what we what and how to get it can be like searching aimlessly through a foggy abyss. In FOG, Morrison captures feelings of uncertainty, desperation, and ultimate release throughout a journey to the water’s surface.  These feelings also reflect Morrison’s artistic process of holding her breath underwater to capture each submerged form.  The series tells the story of accepting the unknown:  that which is on the other side of the surface and beyond the frame. 
Her dive into underwater photography began when she was photographing dancers, and found herself constantly pondering how to eliminate gravity as the barrier keeping her from the shots she wanted. After trying trampolines and other tricks in the air, Morrison decided to try water instead. Seen underwater, the figures have an otherworldly mysticism about them. The reflective underside of the water’s surface shows a warped mirror image, and infuses each photograph with an intriguing symmetry. The colors are muted and few, but beautiful, nearly translucent.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Beth Galton’s Photographs Of Cut Soup, Doughnuts, Coffee And More

Beth Galton photography1 Beth Galton photography2

Beth Galton photography3

Beth Galton‘s series Cut Food is a side of food photography rarely seen – the inside.  Galton is a prolific photographer specializing in food.  While she works primarily in advertising and commercial photography, Cut Food is one of several conceptual projects from Galton.  The series captures common foods, though some not so commonly sliced in half.  Canned soups and a cup of coffee seem to rest perfectly in half of a container.  In order to catch some of these Galton replaced the liquids in the foods with a gelatin.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Charlie Engman

Charlie Engman is a New York-based photographer who looks to capture everyday elements that have been stuck together in new and bizarre ways. The Oxford University graduate came to photography late, but his photographs show a true talent in bringing an air of surreality to the everyday. More of his work can be seen below.

Currently Trending

Douglas Kelley Show: Barnaby Whitfield Interview

B/D has been a fan of Barnaby Whitfield’s work since we featured him way back in issue X. We’re totally in love with his beautifully rendered and grotesquely exquisite pastels but were surprised to find that he is dabbling in the world of performance. Watch Barnaby’s performance as well as a informal roundtable discussion about the performance and his work in this video for the Douglas Kelley Show. Keep up the good work Barnaby!

Currently Trending

Stanzie Tooth

A recent graduate of Ontario College of Art and Design (OCAD), Stanzie Tooth paints scenes that evoke a sense of calm. Her works often feature woodland landscapes, sometimes bursting with pastel hues that would make a Fauvist blush.

Currently Trending

David Zsako’s Scary Faces

Truly disturbing (and awesome) portrait collages by David Zsako.

Currently Trending

Harma Heikens

Harma Heikens

Harma Heikens produces these utterly amazing sculptures of children. Delving into the playfulness of popular culture and the tempting powers of advertising, Heikens “calls forth visions of a befouled world terrorized by economic and sexual exploitation.” What she delivers is pornographic and cynical, and simultaneously comforting in their reference to saints and martyrdom. These children communicate a grim, post-apocalyptic reality, one in which “the world has deteriorated or one in which we, the viewers, have lost our innocence.”

Currently Trending

Yuri Suzuki’s Tiny Robot Orchestra Turns Drawings Into Music

animation-1

suzuki-robots suzuki-1

For Japanese designer Yuri Suzuki, dyslexia prevented him reading music in the traditional sense. But that didn’t stop him playing it. Instead, he adopted a playful approach and created an installation that invites viewers to produce their own music using color markers. Visitors draw along the curvy lines on the floor, and then the robots translate their marks into one-of-a-kind sound pieces.

The robots are called Color Chasers, and they associate each color that they find on their path with a sound. This small, unique orchestra features five different machines that each have their own sound and shape. The Basscar has a Dubstep-like sound, the Glitchcar reproduces computer-like sounds, and the Melodycar, Arpeggiocar, and the Drumcar to add rhythm.

This imaginative work was recently selected by the New York MoMA for their collection. (Via Spoon and Tamago)

Currently Trending