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Andreas Frank’s Manipulated Photos Exhibited Underwater In A Sunken Ship

A little while ago, Andreas Frank took a dive down to the Gen. Hoyt S. Vandenberg, a  United States missile tracking ship that was recently sunk 7 miles off the coast of Key West, Florida in order to create an artificial reef. While he was down there, Frank, who is a successful commercial photographer, took pictures of the wreck. He used the resulting images as the basis for a series of digitally manipulated photos depicting various underwater happenings on the sunken ship. The cool part: he then staged an exhibition of the photos on the deck of the ship! Divers took in the exhibit in full scuba gear. I’m not sure that bobbing up and down under water is the best way to take in Frank’s work, but it is kinda cool. See more photos from the Vandenberg- Life Below the Surface show after the jump, as well as a video of divers checking out the pictures while down by the ship.

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Aldis Ozolins

 

Aldis Ozolins is a maker of zines, posters, and experimental illustrations that represent memories from the place he was born: Riga, Latvia. While Aldis’ current professional direction and focus is on graphic design and interactive experiences (both of which he is damn good at), we chose to feature his illustrative work and side-projects due to the strong emotional qualities embedded so clearly within each of the pieces. It’s easy to get lost in the figures and environments his images bring to life… enjoy a selection after the jump.

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Geoff J. Kim

It seems like everyone is into collage these days and Geoff J. Kim is no exception. His playful and surreal collages place figures in distant yet familiar situations and lands where everything is not what it seems.

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Best Of 2012: Barbie As Famous Works Of Art

Johannes Vermeer ,“La Jeune Fille à la Perle”

Andy Warhol, “Marylin”

Jocelyne Grivaud reinvents Barbie as famous works of art and cultural icons throughout the ages.

“This design needed time to take root, as often. The whole story began one day, in November 1967, with a present, all tenderness.

It was pink, vaporous and extremely delicate. With the patience of an angel, my mother had secretly knitted a dressing gown and tiny bootees for my Barbie. It seems to me there were more clothes, but these bootees, with their little pink knots on top totally fascinated me.
Then I grew up. The doll vanished, but I kept in mind the elegance and grace of my Barbie as well as a little bootee deep down my secret box.
One day, the idea of extending the happy part of my childhood through pictures I love took shape. Barbie is often criticized for being too blonde, too superficial, too skinny,  too “ideal marketing”, too “this” and too “that”…. My aim was to adjust this so famous profile to different emblematic representations.

Here’s my personal contribution as a birthday present to my mascot, Barbie, superimposed on the vision of artists whose work I greatly appreciate.
Let me thank them all for creating such intense pictures. Many thanks to Ruth Handler for creating this dolly model that enraptured me throughout my childhood.”

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Amanda Jasnowski’s Photographs Covever In Endless Patterns Leave Us In The Sublime

Amanda Jasnowski - Digital C-Print

Amanda Jasnowski - Digital C-Print

Amanda Jasnowski - Digital C-Print

Amanda Jasnowski - Digital C-Print

The playfully colorful and innocent world of Brooklyn based photographer Amanda Jasnowski is completely irresistible. The compositions in her photography are filled with brilliant colors, clashing patterns, and minimal settings. Each one is stranger than the last. Cropped just at the right spot, hiding just enough content, her photography seems familiar to us, but leaves a strange yet lovely taste. Jasnowski is tricky in setting up compositions so intriguing and sublime, they leave you wanting more. Because her photography does not allow us to see or make sense of exactly what is going on, they create a playful suspense, similar to a film still. Not surprisingly, this whimsical artist is a big believer in fun and the importance of never taking yourself too seriously.

Because much of the focus in her works is on the meshing of pattern on clothing, Jasnowski’s photography style holds the flavor of a high fashion photo shoot. Of course, the focus is not just on the clothing worn in her photo shoots, but on the whole, wonderfully surreal compositions. Jasnowski holds an amazing power of experimentation over her creativity. She is constantly pushing and transforming her own technique to create more complex composition by combining stunning colors, busy patterns, and flattened space. Her palette is not just restrained to her beautiful, shallow backgrounds or props, but she also envelopes the models in her photographs with her signature pastels. This was done in her series titled Greetings From Utopia in collaboration with fellow artist Jimmy Marble. (via IGNANT)

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Yorgo Alexopoulos’ Multi-Monitored Video Installations

Transmigrations, Cristin Tierney Gallery, 2012

Transmigrations, Cristin Tierney Gallery, 2012

Transmigrations, Cristin Tierney Gallery, 2012

Transmigrations, Cristin Tierney Gallery, 2012

Transmigrations, Cristin Tierney Gallery, 2012

Yorgo Alexopoulos is a New York-based artist who creatively uses media to construct immense installations and artworks.  He combines his paintings, drawings, photographs and films with digital animation and sound to generate works that often comment on transcendental themes.  Generally using multiple monitors or projections, Alexopoulos’ installations have a life to them that relies on rhythm, synchronization and movement.  For instance, at Norman Foster’s Bow Building in Calgary, Alberta, Alexopulos created a 27 channel video installation that is otherworldly and stunningly beautiful (even just in images).

For his last solo show at Cristin Tierney gallery in New York, Transmigrations, Alexopoulos was inspired by his early paintings.  Using the Constructivist movement formed in Russia in the early 20th century as his point of departure, Alexopoulos investigated a narrative based on folklore, magic and spirituality.  Alexopoulos incorporated images, videos and paintings to create an animated journey.  Part Moholy-Nagy kinetic sculpture, Jennifer Bartlett’s Rhapsody, and early landscape painting, Transmigrations is, as stated in the press release for the exhibition, a “contemplation and reverence of nature and all aspects of our universe that are beyond comprehension.”

Alexopoulos recently completed a permanent video installation for Chicago’s IBM building that is equally engaging and mesmerizing.

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Aurelien Arnaud

shutup

Grenoble, France’s Aurelien Arnaud‘s art work is not something you would walk by without looking twice. Arnaud’s designs are sharp, bright, and some, a little risque.  Interesting none the less. Not only a very skilled designer, Arnaud founded PNTS studio with Denis Carrier.

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Jenny Fine Reanimates Her Dead Grandmother

jennyfine_flatgranny_13 jennyfine_flatgranny_10 flat-granny-and-dad

American artist Jenny Fine creates Flat Granny, a life-sized cardboard cut-out of her grandmother. The artist is interested in creating a tangible ‘thing’ that would resemble her dear, and very influential relative. With this cut-out, she attempts to extend a relationship beyond death. Apart from the cutout, Fine goes a bit further and develops a more’ carnal’ approach to the cut-out of her grandmother…

In an interest to reanimate her still image, I turned Flat Granny’s photographic body into a costume.

The bizarre, yet endearing idea is inspired by Victorian traditions of post-mortem photography, as well as the novel concept of a Flat Daddy/Mommy , photographic cut-outs of deployed soldiers for their children/ family while the soldier is away at war.

The photographs you see here feel and look surreal. However, there is no way to escape these vibes when you are looking at an object that in essence represents the absence of someone dearly missed and loved. This project is personal, but it also goes deeper than just a moving gesture from a loving granddaughter. It brings forth the realities of our attachment to the physical world- and the physical body, as well as the lengths we would go to in order to fill that void we feel when we’ve lost someone important in our lives.

Can something like this do the trick? Or would it be just plain weird and inappropriate?

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