Get Social:

Winnie Truong’s Bearded Friends

Canadian artist Winnie Truong creates the coolest illustrations with pencil crayon on paper.  I am particularly enjoying his Ornament and Correction piece.  Who knew Crayola could be this awesome?

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Juana Gomez Embroiders Human Anatomy On Top Of Faded Photographs Of The Body

Juana Gomez - Embroidery Juana Gomez - Embroidery Juana Gomez - Embroidery Juana Gomez - Embroidery

Juana Gomez is a Chilean artist who embroiders the central nervous system over faded photographs of the human body. The images arrive from Gomez’s dreams, as well as her lifelong fascination for archaeology and artifacts. After printing her photos on fabric, she goes in with a needle and thread and stitches veins, musculature, and neural pathways that flow together in a harmonious network. Her work is somewhat reminiscent of anatomy studies from the Italian Renaissance, exploring an ages-old fascination for the human body.

Gomez’s works are scientific in form and ritualistic in creation, melding together the organic and inorganic world with accuracy and a flowing reverence. By translating images of the body into thread and ghostly outlines, she reveals the complexity and beauty of our anatomy; the interconnected lines and patterns she sews can be seen in river tributaries, tree branches, streets, and even Internet traffic. She calls these similar systems a “common language” that connects the biological, social, and cultural realms, as well as the internal world with the external (Source). The result is a spiritual exploration of the body that connects our corporeal selves with the systems that exist within and beyond its boundaries.

You can see more of Gomez’s work on her website, Artsy page, and Instagram. (Via My Amp Goes to 11)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Graffiti Artists Paint A 15,000 Square Foot Mural On The Walls Of A Swiss Prison

img_0432_72dpidsc_0035_72dpi dsc_0313_72dpi dsc_2359_72dpi

Sixteen graffiti artists painted over 4500 square meters of a Swiss prison throughout an eighteen month period. Their work spanned exercise yards, corridors, stairwells, and the extensive outside wall, which alone would use around 1000 spray paint cans. The project began as a sort of celebration of graffiti as a unique art style as well as a desire to bring the artists’ work into a new environment with a challenge of large walls. Besides pushing personal boundaries of creating work on such a grand scale, the artists wanted to change the atmosphere of the prison. Their project would turn a cold, banal, uncomfortable setting into a warmer space for both prisoners and staff. The duration of creating the paintings was equally matched by the amount of planning and concept creating needed to span such a large space and find harmony between sixteen different artistic styles. The physicality and planning, however, were not the only difficult tasks: the artists were met with an emotional challenge as well. Despite knowing they we not confined, they were still consistently aware of their setting and were given a mere glimpse of what it is like on the inside. For example, they needed to call guards to be let out of the space and were daily witnesses to the day to day tension that exist within a prison.

Artists include Malik, Claude “Note” Lüthi, Robert Proch, Onur, Mizzo, Ti, Lain, Ata “Toast” Bosaci, Huran “Shark” Dogan, Daniel Zeltner, Sarah Parsons, Nevercrew (Pablo Togni and Cristian Rebecchi), Benjamin Solt, David Monllar, and Chromeo

A book, titled 4661m2: Art in Prison, has been published about the project to allow the public access to the locked up work. The book also hopes to inspire similar projects.

For more information, check out the projects website here.

Currently Trending

Erik A. Frandsen

 

Aros

Aros, 2000

Danish-born Erik A. Frandsen has studied ceramics, sculpture, and graphics in many locations including Greece, Italy, and France. But now Frandsen resides in his native country of Denmark, where he has created many installations that intertwine many different components. His work is known for being created in multiple layers. There is the layer that are appealing to the viewer at first and then repel the viewer after a second glance. The construction of his installations happen when he combines a drawing or a piece on canvas with lights, rubber tires, or boxes. And in one piece he even uses butter.

 

Currently Trending

Fiona Banner’s Massive Fighter Plane Installations

In 2010 Fionna Banner installed Harrier And Jaguar at the Tate Britain. The massive installation  juxtaposed real fighter planes inside the neo-classical gallery spaces. Weapons of mass destruction have never looked so good.

“According to Fiona Banner, Harrier and Jaguar are “ambiguous objects implying both captured beast and fallen trophy”.  While the Sea Harrier was transformed into a “captive bird”, with feathered markings on its surface similar to the Harrier Hawk, the Jaguar lay belly-up on the floor with posture suggestive of a submissive animal”- Urban Ghosts

“We all hate war but these objects inspire a strange enthusiasm in us. When you reflect on their beauty it’s a strange thing, people say surely they are designed with an aesthetic in mind and, of course, they’re not. They are absolutely designed to function and that function is to kill, and that says something questionable about our aesthetic judgement and makes us ask questions about our moral position.”  – Fionna Banner as told to The Guardian

More images of Fionna’s work after the jump.

Currently Trending

Muralist “Moneyless” Creates Intricate Geometrics That Will Remind You of Visions In A Kaleidoscope

Moneyless - Paint on WallMoneyless - Paint on WallMoneyless - Paint on Wall

Moneyless - Paint on Wall

With his work engulfed in geometric shape, the artist known as “Moneyless” creates infinite patterns of triangles and circles that seems to multiply endlessly. The Italian artist having talent in both two and three-dimensional work, his murals and paintings on wood are cosmic bound, mesmerizing and hypnotizing you with its fluid shapes. Originally a street artist, his influences from graffiti is apparent in his work on walls, with their bold color schemes and intense movement across the spaces they inhabit. This breakdown of text based graffiti into more non-representational, abstracted forms and shapes allows for more contextual freedom.

These murals and wall pieces are reminiscent of a kaleidoscope or a Spiro graph, with repetitive circles turning his compositions into large-scale Slinkies. Moneyless’s works on wood contain the same depth and intricacy created from his geometric perception, with an excellent eye on negative space. Staring into these works will have you lost in their unbelievable intricacy and rhythm. Each line is so thin and delicate, but make up a larger part of the stronger whole. This series is brilliantly symmetrical, forming a central focal point that pulls us into the space. The artist sees the triangle shape as the root to life, making up our existence along with everything around us. The reoccurring theme of geometry represents the foundation of life itself.

Currently Trending

Camilo José Vergara Documents Camden New Jersey’s Crumbling Economics

vergaraphotography3

vergaraphotography

vergaraphotography5

vergaraphotography8

Camilo José Vergara’s 40-year project, “Tracking Time,” chronicles urban transformation in some of the poorest and most segregated communities in the Northeastern United States. In Camden, New Jersey, one of the poorest cities he regularly visits during his documentation, he captures what he calls “Paired Houses”: two dwellings that share a wall, one of them occupied, the other empty. Because each dwelling is part of the same building, Vergara is able to capture the stark contrast between deteriorated and maintained habitats, reflecting the declining state of Camden’s housing market. For some of the photographs, Vergara returns to a building he’s previously documented in order to chronicle the absence of formerly dilapidated buildings.

In his photo essay for Slate, Vergara writes,”If a resident of a middle-class neighborhood dies or moves to a nursing home, or if a dwelling burns, the empty house is usually guarded or secured by the owner’s family. The police keep an eye out for it. Neighbors, well-aware of the impact of a deteriorating eyesore on property values, alert city officials whenever they see a house falling into disrepair. The situation is quickly brought under control.

It’s different in a crumbling inner city like Camden. Even Walt Whitman’s old house at 328 Mickle St.—the only home he ever owned—was by the 1980s adjacent to a vacant three-story dwelling and just two houses away from a ruin. House values in Camden are low and likely to remain so since the population of the city is declining, unemployment is high, and there is little new demand for houses. The number of vacant houses is likely to increase; many will eventually be acquired by the city, which is too poor either to board them up or to demolish them.”

Currently Trending

10 LAST MINUTE GIFTS IDEAS!

Have you been putting off your holiday shopping until today? If so here are 10 great gift ideas from our shop that will not only make your loved ones ecstatic but will keep them inspired just in time for 2012!

Currently Trending