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Lunar Cycle Installation Examines The Relationship Between The Moon And The Ocean.

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Pool, The Alchemy of Blue by Australian artist Lizzie Buckmaster Dove poetically celebrates the relationship between the moon and the ocean.  The stone-like pieces found in these images are the remnants of swimming pool found near the ocean in Dove’s hometown of Coledale.  The nearby ocean was slowly destroying the pool with each tide.  The two installations pictured here are a kind of homage to the powerful force of the moon on the ocean below.  She constructed the circles below with her friends to coincide with the lunar cycle.  One arrangement featured the concrete fragment’s blue hued side facing up for the corresponding blue moon.  Dove and her friends organized an empty circle with the concrete at its perimeter for another arrangement to coincide with the new moon.   [via]

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Gavin Potenza

Gavin PotenzaGavin Potenza is a designer living in Portland, OR. “He enjoys thought-provoking design that is both unexpected and inspiring. He strives to do many things in his life. As well, he enjoys working on projects, and thinking about projects.”

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Jessica Tremp

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Working out of Melbourne, Australian photographer Jessica Tremp produces some lovely creative pieces. Her technique is rather dusty, as if her work was produced some sixty years ago; complementing her taxidermic subjects and derelict settings. Each piece impresses the viewer with unsettling beauty.

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Awesome Video Of The Day: No Title Can Describe What The Hell This Is!

If you’re looking for a good reason to not take drugs then watch the video after the jump. I’m not really sure what we’re looking at but It’s either belongs in a museum or in a mental hospital. You be the judge.

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Frank Plant – Man of Steel

frank-plant-cat-masterFrank Plant has a slightly ironic last name to be working with steel.  What is interesting about his work is that Frank also incorporates cheap plastic flowers, sponge and flock.  I enjoyed looking at the detail of the above piece to see how the plastic flowers were incorporated.  Check out the detail and more of his work after the jump.

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Katarzyna Majak’s Portraits Of Modern Witches

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Katarzyna Majak‘s “Women of Power” photography series captures the faces and dress of earth-worshipping Polish women who are powerful among their particular spiritual sectors. The vast majority of Poland’s people (90%) are practicing Catholics. When Christianity was introduced to Poland a few centuries ago, it erased most traces of paganism, witchcraft, and shamanic traditions. The women Majak photographs – ranging in age from their 30’s to their 80’s – represent the very small minority of Polish women who practice alternative spirituality. For many of these women, this series depicts their first public display of power. They “practice a wide range of spiritual paths and spiritual systems. A few are traditional healers (so called ‘whisperers’ who mix religion with primeval superstitions to heal and remove spells using prayers) whose traditions survived on the Belarusian border. Some are women who had grandmothers who could ‘see’ or were herbal healers and who are working to revive what would otherwise be dead traditions.”

Porter Contemporary, where Majak’s work was featured in 2012, writes, “When asked what being a witch meant to one of the subjects in the series, she replied ‘A witch is a woman of knowledge who takes a broom and sweeps to cleanse the world.’” (via feature shoot)

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Tsherin Sherpa’s Contemporary Twist On Tibetan Thangka Paintings

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Tsherin Sherpa, born in Kathmandu Nepal, originally trained as a traditional Tibetan thangka painter with his father Master Urgen Dorje. From the age of twelve, he underwent six years of intensive training before travelling to Taiwan to study Mandarin and computer science. Since then he has returned to thangka painting but has added a contemporary twist to the traditional paintings leaving behind the traditional confines of the age old practice. His work now mixes the techniques and imagery of thangka with contemporary subject matter.

When asked about breaking from tradition Sherpa states:

“Sometimes if one gets too obsessed with the rules, there’s a danger of getting entangled in that very obsession.  We then become more concerned about not breaking the rule. Because of that, from the traditional art’s point of view, the contemporary work with Buddhist imagery may even get categorized as sacriligious. I am working with some of the images that are viewed as the ultimate portrayal of certain deity. And to manipulate it, is obviously taboo.

However, if we scratch the layer a little deeper, and analyze these Buddhist images, one will find that they are a means to develop a practitioner’s (Buddhist) goal towards enlightenment, which means that the images are not the ultimate goal but rather a vehicle. A representation of a Buddha in 2- or 3-dimensional form is not the actual Buddha. It is a mere representation. And to fall into the trap of perceiving them to be the ultimate, is actually getting oneself entangled with the rules.”

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David Mach Uses Matchsticks To Create Bold Colored Portraits

David Mach creates sculptures using a wide variety of materials from coat hangers to collaged paper but his bold portraits made out of thousands of matchsticks are some of my favorites. Gluing tens of thousands of matchsticks together, Mach (appropriate last name huh?) uses matches with various colored tips to create the realistic heads that have a psychedelic meets tribal art feel to them.

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