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New work by Lehel Kovacs

 

Illustrator Lehel Kovacs creates charmingly simple illustrations & text that look sort of like wood block prints. New works just added to his portfolio!

 

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Murray John

“Goodbye London” is the new music video from Luke Jackson, directed and animated by London-based animator Murray John. It combines stop motion photography of London with some nice hand-drawn animation added with After Effects. “I set out to capture the bitter sweetness of London life, using urban sketchy drawings on walls,” says Mr. John.

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“Broads, Boobs and Buckles: The Pinball Art of Dave Christensen”

Broads, Boobs and Buckles: The Pinball Art of Dave Christensen

Kristi Engle Gallery is proud to present its last show of the season, “Broads, Boobs and Buckles: The Pinball Art of Dave Christensen” on view from July 11th – August 8th, 2009.

While the mechanics of pinball were developed by engineers, the illustrations were handled by graphic artists. This work included the back glass and the playing field of each machine. Curated by local collector, Mark Andresen, this exhibition features the work of acclaimed pinball machine artist, Dave Christensen. 11 pinball machines will display Christensen’s graphics as well as the original artwork used in fabrication and drawings for proposed and/or rejected versions and prototypes.

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View/Source exhibition at Think Tank Gallery

VIEW / SOURCE presents two conflicting projects that deal with the phenomenon of “source code” hidden within our everyday experiences. Friedland’s work explores the integration of cross-lateral human understandings, while Manos’ systems aim to speculate their irrelevance. Two B/D featured artists will be presenting work at Think Tank Gallery in downtown LA this thursday! Aurelia Friedland (B/D feature), and Matt Manos (Book 1, Future Perfect, and B/D feature).

Opening: 12/08/11, 7-11 PM
By Appointment through 12/17/11

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Jose Manuel Hortelano-Pi

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Madrid based illustrator, Jose Manuel Hortelano-Pi, creates these wonderfully detailed pen and watercolor works. I for one especially enjoy his black and white drawings (like the above.)

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The Sensual World & Kate Bush Fest @ Synchronicity Gallery

Synchronicity Space is pleased to present, “The Sensual World”, opening Saturday July 11th (tomorrow!) at 7pm at Synchronicity Gallery: a celebration of the life & work of Kate Bush curated by Joseph Gillette. For decades, Kate Bush has been considered an icon in music and art, constantly pushing boundaries and defying expectations. Unafraid to branch out experimentally, her music can be as grotesque as it is graceful, showing us that beauty is multi-faceted and mysterious. The selection of artists in this exhibition recreate the eclectic feel of her music, and explore the vivid setting she creates, aiming to bring the user into the Sensual World.

Running until July 25th, Saturday’s opening will kick-off the celebration with a reception for the artists at 7pm and a live musical tribute at 10pm. The next day, Sunday at 8pm: we will be screening of a film written, directed by, and starring Kate Bush along with special interviews, videos, and documentary footage.

Artists include:
Greg Carideo, Eric T. Carlson (who has a spread in our next book, preview here!), Ryan S. Carr, Allegra M. Denton, Katelyn Reece Farstad, Isa Newby Gagarin, Joseph Lunders, Nathan Meagher, Raychel Steinbach

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Cathrine Ertmann Confronts Death With Her Powerful Photo Essay From the Morgue

Muscular stiffening begins between four and twelve hours after death. It starts in the neck and makes movement of the limbs impossible. When it reaches the scalp, it can make the dead body’s hair rise. Like goose bumps on the living.

Muscular stiffening begins between four and twelve hours after death. It starts in the neck and makes movement of the limbs impossible. When it reaches the scalp, it can make the dead body’s hair rise. Like goose bumps on the living.

 His breast isn’t moving. The cells in his body have carried out the last of their work, the mechanisms have come to a halt and he is now not going to get any older.

His breast isn’t moving. The cells in his body have carried out the last of their work, the mechanisms have come to a halt and he is now not going to get any older.

In the chapel of the Pathological Institute of Aarhus University Hospital, the dead are received. Here they are dressed in clothes, their hair is combed and they are laid in the coffin, before we can say our last goodbye to those we have lost.

In the chapel of the Pathological Institute of Aarhus University Hospital, the dead are received. Here they are dressed in clothes, their hair is combed and they are laid in the coffin, before we can say our last goodbye to those we have lost.

Here are lying women and men, girls and boys on ice, because they were careless, because they were unlucky, or because their time was come. This woman was found dead in her home. She has just been through an autopsy, which confirmed that she didn’t die the victim of a crime. Soon her body will be dressed and laid in the coffin.

Here are lying women and men, girls and boys on ice, because they were careless, because they were unlucky, or because their time was come. This woman was found dead in her home. She has just been through an autopsy, which confirmed that she didn’t die the victim of a crime. Soon her body will be dressed and laid in the coffin.

These photos of the dead are purposefully anonymous. In “About Dying” Danish photographer Catherine Ertmann was aiming for the universality of death rather than the stories of these particular dead. And that’s what makes this series so moving. In photographing the dead so intimately, bare of everything, including their life stories, she has made room for the viewer in the morgue—as observer and as deceased. Who doesn’t project themselves into the sewn torso, the half-clenched hand, the freckled cheek? Will it be the zipped bag or the fiery crematorium in the end? How can we live fully if we can’t look at death?

“This project tries to break down the taboo by showing something we rarely have access to, and that death can be both hard to look an but also beautiful. Just like when a new life comes into the world when a woman is giving birth. It deals with the incomprehensible fact that life ends and hopefully remind the audience that our time here is precious and what things really matter while we are here.”

This project was approved by Aarhus Universitets Hospital (University Hospital of Aarhus, Denmark), where she and journalist Lise Hornung worked.

The only complete certainty in life is that one day we will die. It is the most certain thing in the world, and the biggest uncertainty we experience of the world, because nobody can say what will happen afterwards. Maybe that is why we find it so difficult to speak about death.

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Roe Ethridge

647_1230252858Roe Ethridge’s Double Santa and many other photographs can be seen at the Sutton Lane website.

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