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Patty Chang

makingout

In Patty Chang’s video art piece, “In Love”, she makes out with her mom and dad… I am horrified. I literally squirmed through the entirety of the video. I don’t really know what to say about this… all I know is that I feel like crying and I don’t know why.

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The Electronic Installations of Alberto Tadiello

The work of Italian artist Alberto Tadiello peeks into the vagaries of technology, nature, and their relationships.  For example, the first five photos of this post depict the installation EPROM (an acronym for Erasable Programmable Read Only Memory).  The installation mounted on the wall consists of music boxes connected to small electric motors, which are in turn connected to transformers.  While the tinny notes of the music boxes may conjure  memories of childhood at first, the motors and music boxes are soon spinning faster than the mechanisms can withstand.  Eventually the motors wear out reducing the ‘music’ to a hardly noticeable noise.  Of this event, the gallery statement says:

“Once the pawls wear out the noise slowly becomes less noticeable and even indistinguishable. The high-speed movement is associated with a sort of cathartic event, which relieves the music box interface from bearing nostalgic feelings.” [via]

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Interview: Jeff Soto

Jeff Soto recently opened his newest exhibition, “Turning in Circles” at the Riverside art museum last weekend. Many of Soto’s works include references to the natural world and organic phenomena, whether in his titles such as “Cold Ice Age,” “Butterfly Swarm,” “Wild Growth,” or within visual iconography, ranging from plant-like root tendrils curling around the frames. Yet within these seemingly pastoral suggestions, Soto overlays a grid of human technology, destruction, violence. Highly influenced by graffiti, illustration, murals, comic book art and other forms of non-traditional visual expressions, Soto creates a fanciful hyper-colored world that playfully examines the age old battle between man, machine and nature, played out through technicolor characters and settings. 

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Artist Knits Herself A Boyfriend

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In a world of online matchmaking and social media, the artist Noortje de Keijzer offers a simpler option: an art piece and product entitled My Knitted Boyfriend, a knit pillowcase that comes to life when stuffed. In this witty critique of modern dating and expectations, My Knitted Boyfriend eliminates all the messy parts of a human relationship, conforming to individual preferences; he will enjoy whatever you enjoy, and he “can be adjusted to your own tastes” with the use of accessories like facial hair, tattoos, or glasses.

Although humorous in its somewhat cynical outlook on modern love, the piece is unexpectedly sentimental. The boyfriend himself comes along with an illustrated book narrating the story of de Keijzer and her cuddly lover, much like children’s picture books that include a stuffed animal. Also like a children’s storybook, the text and illustration follows a simple, nostalgic format: we are told that they “sleep together” and are offered an innocent sketch of the pair doing just that. The boyfriend, though he is not real, becomes a precious manifestation of the fictional—or imaginary—friend that enchants the young mind.

Complicating the delightfully sweet story of the artist and her beau is the work’s clever take on the domestic theme. As seen in her charming short film, the relationship is build not around professional ambition or the public realm; instead, they eat breakfast and watch movies. In fact, the man himself is knitted and therefore associated with the home. This 1950s-style domestic romanticism is brilliantly complicated and subverted by the fact that the male and not the female here is the homemaker; in place of the mid-century ideal of the perfect wife, My Knitted Boyfriend is that crucial element that makes a house a home. In the artist’s own astute words to her knitted partner, “You fit in my interior perfectly.” (via Design Boom)

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Daniel Firman

I’m really shocked by how life-like (and well-dressed!) these plaster figures are– what a great art and fashion combo. He also balanced a taxidermied elephant on her trunk, proving something that seems outside the realm of possibility by what we think we know about gravity.

(Photo courtesy Neotorama)

Alright, that’s it for taxidermy! I’ve maxxxed out!

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Telephone Blue- Tonight At Synchronicity Space Los Angles

For their exhibition, Telephone Blue, taking place at Synchronicity Space on April 20 – May 19, Aaron Anderson, Eric Carlson and Crystal Quinn (founding members of the artist collective Hardland/Heartland) continue their formal practice of intuitive collaboration to produce narratives of playful allegories and coded symbols that materialize as drawing, video, and sculpture. This exhibition will exist as an extension, literally and figuratively speaking. Physical work existing in a digital world that happens to be an extension of our physical world.

In addition to the physical gallery show the three artists have collaborated with LA artist Spencer Longo on a web based project that lives on the Synchronicity website called LA Internet. See LA Internet at www.syncspacela.com at anytime and visit the shows opening tonight from 7-10pm at 713 Heliotrope, LA, CA 90029.

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Beautiful Parasites- The The Morbid Reality Of Being Human Illustrated In Tammy Salzl’s Watercolors

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Psychologically dark and a bit grotesque, the watercolors of Montreal based artist Tammy Salzl are meant to be like beautiful parasites. She wants the images of scared children, fragile adults or lonely humans to disturb viewers at first, then slowly over time, delight them with their unique beauty. These emotional studies have evolved from Salzl’s earlier work where she placed the disturbed characters based on Grimm fairy tales in lush, busy backgrounds. Wanting to isolate the figure to exaggerate their state of mind, she has cleared the background and focused on the complexities of skin and the different emotions it can express.

I want the flesh I paint to make a connection between the material of paint and the material of the body, to reflect not only a psychological makeup but to suggest an ‘objectness’ of the body – a medium that is vulnerable to the stresses of life. I want the flesh I make to embody the human condition. (Source)

The figures in Salzl’s art are all suffering from some kind of conflict or anguish. She says she is most interested in expressing the psychological and emotional aspects of human nature, and does it in a personal way rather than in a cliched, way about our society as a whole.

I use allegory and metaphor to to express my particular anxieties and what I perceive to be a generalized psychosis in society. Instead of portraying dead Afghanistan civilians or animals that are going extinct at exponential rates, I paint people with gnarled, anguished flesh and and haunted faces that place them in conflicting settings that are familiar yet foreign. (Source)

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So Many Wizards – “Inner City” directed by Greg Ruben

Artist, Designer, Filmmaker, and all-around dude-that-makes-stuff, Greg Ruben, just released a new music video project for So Many Wizards‘ “Inner City.” The video follows an average joe dressed in business-usual as he embarks on the ultimate lunch break in and around a lot of unique spots in Los Angeles. The film’s aesthetic approach is really hypnotizing. You’ll have to see for yourself after the jump…

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