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Kenji Fujita

I love Kenji Fujita’s wonky little plaster-cast combinations. They’re kind of weird, but also free spirited, organic and a bit humorous- with titles like “Debris of Life and Mind.” Heavy…..but funny. That’s a lot of debris. Kenji Fujita will be showing his works from the last 9 years at Samson Gallery, entitled “Systematic Gaiety” from February 6- March 21st. A pretty great title to describe Fujita’s controlled whimsical chaos.

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Digital Healing’s Pixel Hippie Revolution

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Are you into new age healing and crystal powers? Then send Digital Healing a photo of you or your loved one along with one or two ailments. Digital Healing will create a “healing gif” using herbs and crystals made just for you. I don’t know about you but i’m feeling the powerful pixel healing effects already.

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Allen Brewer

Beautiful drawings from the skillful hand of Minneapolis based illustrator Allen Brewer.

Those are some nice glands.

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Dylan DeRose’s Cat Fanciers Association

Photographer Dylan DeRose’s Cat Fanciers Association series proves that not only do dog owners look like their pets but cat owners do as well.

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Beth Galton’s Photographs Of Cut Soup, Doughnuts, Coffee And More

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Beth Galton‘s series Cut Food is a side of food photography rarely seen – the inside.  Galton is a prolific photographer specializing in food.  While she works primarily in advertising and commercial photography, Cut Food is one of several conceptual projects from Galton.  The series captures common foods, though some not so commonly sliced in half.  Canned soups and a cup of coffee seem to rest perfectly in half of a container.  In order to catch some of these Galton replaced the liquids in the foods with a gelatin.

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A Day In Decay: Adventures In Puerto Aventuras

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Everyone needs a break from the hectic workloads and congested traffic that comes with living in LA. So we decided to get some R&R time and head down to Puerto Aventuras.  Any plane trip for me and my fellow dark complexioned friends involves a long line of song and dance with the airport security. As I scanned my passport I was treated with this friendly yet vague note. After 15 minutes of waiting around a mysterious lady came by and asked a few questions. I gave her my best wink and smile and she decided that I wasn’t a terrorist threat and let me go.

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Portraits Taken With A Poloroid Aura Camera

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Carlo Van de Roer‘s Portrait Machine series is a special kind of portrait photography.  De Roer’s portraits are of friends, family, and well known personalities (you may have recognized Miranda July in the first photograph) with a Polaroid Aura Camera.  Related to spirit photography, Aura photography uses electromagnetic readings to create the “auras” of colors in the photographs as well as a report explaining the reading.  Though the process, readings, and reports are hardly scientific, they reveal much about how much we invest in portraiture.  We continually attempt to translate an inner person from outer appearances, particular from a person’s face.  The aura photography further reveals to what extent each person can be a mystery to another, even between those familiar to each other.

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Francesca Pastine’s Artforum Excavations

Francesca Pastine’s Artforum Excavations Is a beautiful series of works where the artist cuts away at various issues of art forum literally excavating the art away and rearranging the pages and layers of the iconic art publication. Lets hope she tears apart a copy of Beautiful/Decay one of these days!

“I began using ARTFORUM magazines as a medium for my work in 2008. I noticed that they were familiar fixtures in my friends’ homes. Apparently, because of their glossy nature, nobody wanted to throw them away. I was intrigued by their square format, particularly when the bloated art market was reflected in their one-inch thickness and I began asking my friends for their unwanted magazines. Starting with the covers, I cut, bend, manipulate, pull, and dig my way through them, revealing a visceral topography of art trends. The finished worked becomes an unsolicited collaboration with the magazine and the cover artist. Maintaining a strong connection to the physicality of drawing, my X-acto blade mimics a pencil, subtracting rather than adding. I eschew glue or other manipulations that change the inherent character of the magazines. In this way, they retain their association to what they are, carriers of information that have been handled, earmarked and scuffed over time. Through physically intervening with these familiar icons of the art establishment, I suffuse the inanimate with emotional power, creating a palpable complexity of form and information.”

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