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Dusdin Condren

Light, shadow, and the human figure feature prominently in the recent works of photographer Dusdin Condren. Whether looking at an arm amputated by shadows or a woman posing Lee Miller-like in the striated light of a nearby window, there is a certain surreal, but serene viewing experience to be had with these photographs. The sometime use of black-and-white certainly increases this special effect.  

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Yayoi Kusama’s Obliteration Room Will Have You Seeing Dots

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A children’s project by Yayoi Kusama has people seeing dots, lots of them. Called The Obliteration Room, the renowned artist known for her sculptures and paintings of dots, decided to have a little fun with the kids. She created an interactive installation geared towards children which asked occupants to enter an all white room and stick the walls and furniture with colorful dots. This allowed participants in essence to make Kusama art. The installation was designed to enable the child part of your brain to run free and create.
Currently displayed at Queensland Art Gallery, the before and after pictures are nothing less than remarkable. In some ways mimicking connect the dots paintings where a gradual buildup occurs, we see how the all-white room is turned into a lively display of dots which turns the stark environment into a colorful painterly mess.
According to Kusama, The Obliteration Room is a place where you empty all your thoughts. The dots become therapeutic, meditative shapes which in Kusama’s case has helped her stay sane. Now at 85, the artist doesn’t keep it a secret that she lives as an outpatient at a mental hospital in Japan. In the 1960’s she was at the forefront of anti-war art demonstrations, in particular protesting the vietnam war. Her work is shown worldwide and is considered one of the more important artists of our time. (via juxtapoz)

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The Direct And Poetic Installations of Adel Abdessemed

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The work of artist Adel Abdessemed is at once direct and poetic.  He often uses common imagery and objects as a point of departure.  However, the mundane beginnings of these objects only further underscore the weighty nature of his art.  Abdessemed’s installations are able to provoke a sudden impact of its viewer.  Still, the installations communicate complex ideas that unfold over extended viewing.  At times controversial, his work is effective in piquing thought and discussion.

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Susanna Bauer Hand Stitches, Nurtures and Embellishes Fallen Leaves

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For Susanna Bauer, a casual fall stroll can lead into a creative process. She transforms nature’s most fragile corpses into mini art sculptures. The leaves she delicately sews and crochets are brought back to life and hung off walls next to their fellow forest companions: pieces of woods and stones. With an astonishing dexterity she is able to roll, curve and assemble elements that were found dried and shriveled. She uses all of her concentration to operate on her findings. The artist takes the raw, emotionless leaves and patiently nurtures them, stitching back their wounds, unifying two different kinds of leaves together and taking care of the smallest details. Comparing the tenderness and tension of her work to the vulnerability and resilience of a human relationship.

She says she doesn’t work with nature but she collaborates with it. She respects flora, and her main will is to embellish the organic beauty that has fallen instinctively on her path. She closely examines how the fragile leaf, with no brutality, can be manipulated; and yet with a firm hand she pierces the dead element, making sure she leaves her imprint. Metaphorically, the work of Susanna Bauer is beyond interesting. To the eyes, it is a simple and precious vision, set in the immensity of a pumpkin toned abundant forest.

Susanna Bauer’s work will be exhibited at Salon Vert in Switzerland as part of a group show until August 2015 and at Lemon Street Gallery in Cornwall UK until September 2015.

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Jim Horwat

Who Killed Biggie Smalls?,  mixed media on masonite, 2003

Who Killed Biggie Smalls?, mixed media on masonite, 2003

Pennsylvania-based illustrator Jim Horwat has an affinity for pop culture. His works frequently reference popular narratives, like the mystery of Notorious BIG’s death, and the plots of various movies, especially well known horror flicks. His strongest pieces are the ones that try to explain as much of the story as possible in one big frame, creating a pastiche of images not unlike some of Will Eisner‘s sequential artworks.

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Steingrim Veum’s NSFW Orgies

Steingrim Veum’s ultra detailed orgy drawings are funny, delicate, playful, and full of amazing scenes that will blow your mind.

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Hubert Duprat Collaborates With Flies To Produce Bejeweled Cocoons

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In a very unique collaboration between man and nature, this exhibition as a part of the Venice Biennale will no doubt impress and amaze you. French artist Hubert Duprat has come up with an interesting and yes, controversial, idea which not only produces a dazzling product and art object, but also comments on the relationship between humans and nature, worker and manager, curator and artist. He has been invited to exhibit his work as a part of the group show Slip Of The Tongue, which addresses friendships, relationships between artists, and the idea

that the activity of the artist is aimed at the preservation and afterlife of objects rather than of their interpretation. (Source)

The art project of Duprat and the Caddis Flies is a perfect example of those themes. He has taken these insects, known for their collecting habits (they naturally collect bits of wood, sand and stones from their environment and build a cocoon around them to fend off any predators) and has instead replaced them with bits of precious and semi-precious stones – rubies, pearls, opals, sapphires, coral, lapis lazuli and diamonds. After several weeks of building up these defensive layers, the insects crawl out of their shells, leaving behind a bejeweled shell.

Critics say Duprat’s practice is no different to acts of animal cruelty, and that he plays no part in making the final product. Duprat even says himself:

……I am playing a bad trick on them… I feel as if I am exploiting my workers….It is their work as much as it is mine. (Source)

And while it is true the Caddis Fly does all of the physical work itself – it’s excreted silk thread is what joins the pieces together – Duprat has applied his imagination and experimentation to turn something quite mundane into something extraordinary. He has made visible what would normally remain unseen, and that is truly an art form. (Via Design Boom)

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anitabling.

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Here’s some hand-crafted whimsy for your Wednesday from artist anitabling.  from Uruguay.  Relief and countour give these geographic, multi-media sculptures a topographical view of a quirky, colorful world.  Check out more work on her photo stream.

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