Get Social:

Advertise here !!!

Argentine Photographer Mariela Sancari Creates Fictionalized Portraits Of Her Deceased Father

184 5 12

Argentine based photographer Mariela Sancari‘s series Moisés, acts as an ode to the traditional type of portrait taken of men in their 70’s, the age her deceased father would have been if he were still alive today. After her father’s death, the artist and her twin sister we denied the chance to see his body. She was never sure if it “was because he committed suicide or because of Jewish religious beliefs or both.” In the artist’s statement, she refers to a concept in thanatology (the study of death and practices associated with it) which asserts that when one does not encounter the dead body of a loved one, the lack of visual association prevents the ability to accept their death. Hence, not having the definitive proof of said death aids denial, one of the most complicated stages of grief. Referring to the Baudrillard quote “photography is our exorcism,” Mariela Sancari uses her photographs to play out the fantasy of her attached denial — she uses her portraits to create a fictionalized version of her father. She states;

“I once read that fiction´s primary task is to favor evolution, forcing us to acknowledge and become the otherness around us. I think fiction can help us depict the endless reservoir of the unconscious, allowing us to represent our desires and fantasies.”

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Leif Huron


Leif Huron
incredibly captures his subjects in awesome vibrancy and beautiful tonality. Huron’s photographs are incredibly detailed and are a treat to the eyes; especially the portrait series. Done in high key, the color contrast of white skin and background to rich colored hair and strikingly deep colored eyes makes for one hell of an image.

Currently Trending

Kris Kuksi’s Churchtanks

Kris Kuksi sculpture4 Kris Kuksi sculpture5

Kris Kuksi sculpture1

The work of artist Kris Kuksi has a decidedly consistent style.  His amazingly intricate sculptures are often dark, reference both the classical world and the industrial landscape, and comment on religion and politics.  His Churchtanks series, though, seems to especially encapsulate his philosophies.  Kuksi seamlessly fuses gaudy cathedrals with modern war tanks to create one imposing structure.  In a strange way, the aesthetics of each seems to compliment the other.  Kuksi effectively uses the structural blending to comment on a connection between religion and violence.

Currently Trending

Ruben Ireland

In his dream-like art and illustrations, London-based graphic artist and illustrator  Ruben Ireland mixes traditional techniques — ink and acrylic — with non-traditional techniques — dirty water, food and weathered paper — and modern techniques — Photoshop and a wacom tablet. Women are fused with natural elements and despite the soft textures appear stronger and more beautiful for it. 

Currently Trending

John Courtney Little

John Courtney Little, Painting

John Courtney Little‘s paintings contain such surreal narrations, full of intense scenarios with eloquently symbolic characters that attempt to exist in such chaotic and mysterious environments. Using a dark and muted color palette focusing around the action of the protagonist or simply the chaotic environment around them, the paintings are very expressive and well crafted.

Currently Trending

Ville Varumo

Ville VarumoFinland photographer, Ville Varumo, has some amazing photography that is dreamy and beautiful. His work is rather unique in the way that Varumo depicts things in isolation, and I love it… good work!

Currently Trending

Kamolpan Chotvichai’s Shredded Self-Portraits Produce The Illusion Of Glitchy Dissolution

chotvichai14 chotvichai6 chotvichai3 chotvichai2

Kamolpan Chotvichai explores the limitations of paper by carefully hand-cutting portraits of herself and rendering an effect of dissolution based on the Buddha’s teaching on anatta (no self). Parts of Chotvichai’s human form appear warped and melted, almost glitchy, as if they are about to disintegrate; the artist’s careful attention to the direction and shape of her cuts produces an elegant illusory effect. Chotvichai explains,

One’s adhering to something can cause the greatest misery in life especially being attached to self-existing. The idea of this self-existing is actually self-formed and leads to variety of emotions. The temper, the mind and the body altogether gradually form the idea of being alive but when putting into consideration, without any substance, it is merely the thought that we think we are existing…The way I create my work is to set consciousness and concentration by slitting and cutting on the portrait of myself which is considered to be the unconditional action of effort and attempt. This action is therefore to destroy and create the emptiness which will lead to the stage of naught.

Chotvichai was born, raised, and educated in Bangkok, where she currently resides. (via my amp goes to 11)

Currently Trending