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Gavin Kenyon

Gavin Kenyon

It’s obvious that sharp blades have carved canyons through the mind of New York artist Gavin Kenyon. His axes, swords, and knives have a way of taking on strangely organic characteristics, and I really like how the pieces attack the space where they are installed. The world of metal sculpture can be dominated by machismo, so I find it interesting that these sculptures appear dangerous and destructive, while being somewhat goofy at the same time.

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Sculptures Of Prominent Figures Made Out Of Wonder Bread

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Oakland-based artist Milena Korolczuk is best known for her work in film, but has recently turned to the medium of Wonder Bread. With the bread and water, she forms a malleable entity, and using precise instruments, she fashions tiny sculptures of iconic historical, pop culture, literature, and art images. Her renditions of these figures are impressively accurate and faithful. Figures pictured are Walt Disney, Vladimir Lenin, Plato, Claude Levi-Strauss, Prometheus, John Malkovich, Andy Warhol, Jay-Z, Jean-Paul Sartre, Stonehenge, Earth, and Marina Abramović.

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New Anthology Essay: Laylah Ali

611_1228847429Laylah Ali’s meticulous, exactingly executed drawings take months to complete. Her works investigate a variety of psychological and socio-cultural dramas, including race, conflict and violence. Interestingly, Ali seems to almost be drawn to the formalist implications of race and “color,” in a decidedly art historical sense of the word. Ali notes, “I’m fascinated, how a different facial color directs you. Green absorbs you into it. Pink or red comes out at you. Light pink doesn’t recede into the page but has a flatness. Bright pink jumps out. Those phenomena affect your reading of the figure- nothing related to anything but what a color does, how it affects your eyeball.”

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Caleb Charland

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Have you ever tried that trick when you photograph a moving light source with a super slow shutter speed to “draw” with your flashlight? Caleb Charland takes that to a whole new level with his most recent work, combining burning matches, mirrors, and sparking wires to make light “sculptures” which he captures on his digital camera. Super awesome? Yes.

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Engineer Zachary Abel Creates Complex Geometrical Sculptures Out Of Office Supplies And Other Household Items

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His passion for mathematics has led Zachary Abel to create geometric, science inspired sculptures made out of random elements. Paper clips, binder clips, playing cards and toothpicks are assembled according to specific formulas.

From far, the round sculptures appear uncomplicated to achieve. In actuality, Zachary Abel uses small needle-nose pliers and a schematic layout. For the Impenetraball project, the ball is comprised of 132 binder clips. The round form is obtained by assembling the binder clips one by one following a flat pattern in order to get a hollow centre and a filled surface. The designs have been so popular the talented engineer had to make a guide on how to construct the binder clip ball on his blog.

Zachary Abel in his Mathematical sculptures series is willing to share his enthusiasm for maths; replacing paint and brushes with pliers and patience. ‘Geometry in particular fascinates me, and I delight in discovering hidden patterns even in the most mundane of objects.’

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Richard Coleman

Richard Coleman

Wow wow wow, Richard Coleman’s work leans towards the magically mysterious, while exhibiting complex combinations of color and form. He’s part of an impressive list of artists included in the very first show at THIS Gallery which opened this weekend in Los Angeles, so if you are in town go check it out!

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Tonya Corkey Creates Portraits Out Of Lint

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Canadian artist Tonya Corkey creates portraits made out of lint on canvas. Through her choice of material and subject, the artist looks to investigate an unavoidable aspect of human nature- precisely, the the need to collect memories and reconstruct the past. The series, “See You In the Future,” looks to further analyze this desire to recollect objects and moments of the past through a medium that encompasses the essence of loss and decay over time.

My work hybridizes the discarded material of lint with the second hand image – the iconic school photograph – to conceptualize my interests. Materiality conceptually layers the work. As a byproduct of society, lint consists of fibers, hair, dead skin and other debris, and thus directly referencing people and their daily activity. Lint and cast off photographs are both discarded materials – materials that reflect the idea of a decaying memory. Our desire for memory in absence is triggered by sensations of smell and touch, a trait of my work.

(via The Jealous Curator)

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Studio Visit: Serena Cole’s Glittery Paintings Tap into our Dark Desires

As part of our ongoing partnership with In The Make, Beautiful/Decay is sharing a studio visit with artist Serena Cole. See the full studio visit and interview with Serena and other West Coast artists at www.inthemake.com.

Serena’s studio is in her Oakland apartment, a modest space that she has efficiently rigged to accommodate her needs. She’s set it up so that her studio takes up most of the apartment’s square footage, but she keeps things flexible with furnishings that are easily moved and rearranged. I’m always impressed with resourcefulness and am appreciative of the kind of ingenuity that comes out of necessity and that manages to circumvent a set of limitations. In fact, the idea of limitations kept coming up for me in thinking about Serena’s artwork because her pieces are very much visually dictated and confined by her reference material. Her work directly appropriates the fashion imagery of advertising campaigns and editorial spreads, highlighting the patterns and tropes used to elicit desire and encourage consumerism. In taking on this imagery, her work attempts to examine what is revealed about our collective psychology, the culture of consumption and escapism, and the complexity of fantasy. In our conversations, she acknowledged that she isn’t so much trying to create something new, but instead aims to deconstruct already existent imagery in the appropriation of it. But this is a slippery slope— in being so tightly tethered to the aesthetics of the fashion world, Serena’s work runs the risk of coming off as analogous instead of questioning. Serena is aware of this risk— in creating art within a framework already heavily loaded with well-established associations, value, and perimeters, she knows the trick is to get the viewer to recognize that there is actually a lot at stake amidst the glitz and glamour.

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