Get Social:

Vintage L.L. Bean Catalog Covers Recreated As Photograph

 

Ever since I was a little kid I remember flipping through the L.L. Bean catalog. I never really bought anything from them but I always thought of them as a heritage brand and a classic symbol for Americana. To celebrate their 100th anniversary L.L. Bean tapped famed photographer Randal Ford to recreate their popular  Spring 1933 catalog cover using local residents from Maine’s Acadia National Park. L.L. Bean documented the entire photo shoot in all its outdoorsy glory with a short behind the scenes documentary. Witness how a vintage painting gets transformed into a modern photograph after the jump!

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Ben Foster’s Aluminum Geometric Animal Sculptures

geometric animal Sculpture geometric animal Sculpture geometric animal Sculpture

Ben Foster‘s sculptures almost appear to be comptuterized digital renderings at first glance. An industrial and natural artist, Foster creates these life-sized animal sculptures out of enamel-coated aluminum, often placing them in the natural environments that surround his New Zealand home. The sculptural form juxtaposed against the natural landscape has a stunning effect, appearing to be at once disparate and cohesive.

From his website, “Foster’s geometrical rendering is suggestive of the animal’s inherent connection to, and place within, the natural environment. Characteristically, it relies on the interplay of light and shadow and while the subject matter is ostensibly pastoral, the result is dramatic with the sculpture’s silhouette as commanding as the mountainous landscape it resembles.” (via colossal)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Lauren Semivan’s Black And White Photography Digs At Our Primitive Nature

Lauren Semivan - Photography Lauren Semivan - black and white photography Lauren Semivan - Photography black and white photography

Lauren Semivan’s black and white photography raises the dead, feels rich with ritual, and sullen from the earth. To say it is simply an abstract psychological expression would be too easy. There’s something else happening here that is magically archaic, and it’s not just the finely tailored compositions that carefully, yet seemingly casually, dig at our remains by arranging drawn fragments, bodies, vegetation, bones, and string, against a sparse backdrop. This “something else” is movement or play not just in the environment, but as or with the environment, a dreamy surreal fade that lingers.

Technically, each image is a true representation of not just what collects, but how the collection becomes. Shot with a purist sense of photography’s past, Semivan uses an early 20th century 8 x 10″ view camera and, without digital manipulation or any touch-ups at all, develops prints from a scanned large format negative. The ephemeral result, interestingly, pushes on our own anthropological or archeological impulses as a species– asking us to engage and connect with our ancestors, creatively, scientifically, and divinely.

Of her work, Semivan states, “In scientific disciplines, a line is classified as an event. Something as primitive as a scrawl on a surface reveals an aggregate of events, intersecting and changing course. Drawings made on the seamless backdrop describe an emotional space. Science is inherently experiential, as is art making. Knowing and feeling are not separate, and the whole of the environment can be used as a pedagogic instrument. Observatory elegantly draws upon a tension that exists between irrational and physical worlds. Within each image, ghosts of previous drawings.”

Currently Trending

Illustrator Spotlight: Théo Gennitsakis

Loving these delicate and funny illustrations by Paris based. Théo Gennitsakis.

Currently Trending

Andrew Hall’s Photographs of Liquid in Motion

Cool series from Los Angeles photographer Andrew Hall. Dubbed “Liquids in Motion”, these pictures take a whole lot of motion and capture it forever in one fluxed-out moment in time. He experiments with all kinds of colors and types of liquid in the photos, from thick, viscous greens, to inky, watery blacks. I want to see a large print of quite a few of these. More “Liquids in Motion” after the jump. (via)

Currently Trending

A Behind The Scenes Look Into One Of The Last Handmade Globe Makers

Bellerby & Co. Globemakers - Globe making Bellerby & Co. Globemakers - Globe making Bellerby & Co. Globemakers - Globe making Bellerby & Co. Globemakers - Globe making

With the availability of digital mapping systems, the tabletop globe seems almost like a vestige of ancient times. The globes we do encounter—in our classrooms, or in antique stores—are either cheap and mass-produced or delicate and expensive. In a fascinating project to reinvigorate the art of globe-making, Peter Bellerby of Bellerby & Co. Globemakers is creating globes entirely by hand, from stretching the gores (the strips of paper) and applying them carefully onto the sphere, to painting and illustrating the maps. The process takes at least 6 months to complete, and it’s not easy—without careful measurements, the globe will remain incomplete. Blending science with art, a perfection-derived sense of beauty inspires Bellerby’s work.

Bellerby’s project began when he was trying to find a good-quality globe for his father’s 80th birthday. His options were limited or unsatisfying, so he decided to create his own globe from scratch—an endeavor into which he poured months of research, money, and work. Realizing that there was a lack of globes being made by hand, Bellerby created his studio in 2008. Now, he works with a team of passionate (and patient) artists to bring back this ancient craft, creating everything from mini artisan desk globes to the “Churchill,” a behemoth globe spanning 127cm. His work has been widely recognized, and deservedly so; in an age when Google Maps magnifies and digitally fragments our perceptions of the earth, Bellerby’s globes demonstrate an intimate understanding of and respect for our planet as a whole.

Visit Bellerby & Co. Globemakers’ website to learn more. (Via Bored Panda)

Currently Trending

They Still Got It: Aging Legends of Burlesque Captured in Photographs

Stephanie Diani - Photography

Satan’s Angel

Stephanie Diani - Photography

Big Fannie Annie

Stephanie Diani - Photography

Candy Baby Caramelo

Stephanie Diani - Photography

Dusty Summers

Since living in Baltimore, I’ve had the chance to attend several burlesque shows and enjoyed them all. I’ve seen performers of all ages, including a few older women, which is often my favorite part of the show; I love seeing these women confident about their bodies, especially in a society that values youth. A photography series by Stephanie Diani captures this same idea. She photographed The Legends of Burlesque, an older group of women burlesque dancers. Diani found these women when she visited the Miss Exotic World pageant many years ago. They made an impression on the photographer, and years later she sought these woman for her project.

All the women photographed are septuagenarians, and performed in burlesque shows well after turning 50, 60, or 70. Even at this age, they still exude a mature sexuality and eroticism. In each portrait, Diani had the women pose for pictures in their favorite Burlesque ensembles or meaningful garment. The resulting images portray glitzy, over-the-top outfits, complete with feathers, fur, beading, and jewels. This is an amusing juxtaposition with their homes, which, not surprisingly, are reminiscent of your grandmother’s home. Each woman looks self-assured and strong, and it isn’t an act. Diani remarks about the women on the Slate photo blog, Behold:

I loved spending time with the women: they were wry and smart and playful. In June 2009, I photographed Hall of Fame legend Big Fannie Annie, by her own account 450 pounds of sizzling sex, in a hotel room in Vegas where she and Satan’s Angel were getting ready to perform during over Hall of Fame weekend. Angel asked Fannie: ‘Do you have any of that cum-in-a-can I can use?’ — a reference to the industrial strength hairspray that is an essential tool of their trade. Another, Toni Elling, took her name from Duke Ellington, whom she used to know. (via Huffington Post)

Currently Trending

Photographer Tim Navis

tim navis crystal2small_905Tim Navis is a talented photographer and a self-proclaimed ‘professional awesometeer’.  Beautiful models and gorgeous landscapes are the main subjects of his imagery.  Life must be pretty fun when you’re surrounded by beauty and spend your time professionally awesometizing.

Currently Trending