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Origami Street Installation from Mademoiselle Maurice

Based in Paris, Mademoiselle Maurice creates colorful installations on the street by conglomerating a bunch of origami. A lot of “street artists” love to talk about how important the ephemeral nature of their work is. Well Mlle. Maurice’s delicate origami doesn’t look like it will last long in its original state. But somehow these works seem really natural in their setting, like a growth of delicate lichen on the shadowed side of a rock. It’s almost as if they appeared on their own. Be sure to check out her website for many more images and projects. (via)

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Population Control

It’s almost 2011 and one year closer to THE END OF THE WORLD so it seems like perfect timing to post a video about Boomboxes coming alive and taking over the world.
Video by Gregthedude for Exile.

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pro snowboarder and filmmaker ANDREW HARDINGHAM is a fun-crazy-wild rider who likes to get weird… and I love it. This video is what I like to call as a bio on his life. From first discovering fire to boobs, Andrew went through some changes…

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Phil Bebbington Is Abandoned

Photographer Phil Bebbington takes pictures of mostly abandoned spaces throughout the world that once were popular like resorts and churches. His portraits can be just as haunting, people that could easily abandon where they are as well. Check out Phil’s flickr and blog too.

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Chie Aoki Human Growth

Are Chie Aoki’s sculptures of humans transforming into amorphous blobs or bulbous shapes morphing into humans?

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Nasa Funahara Recreates Famous Artworks Out Of Masking Tape

Nasa Funahara - Painting Nasa Funahara - Painting Nasa Funahara - Painting Nasa Funahara - Painting

Nasa Funahara recreates iconic artworks, like The Mona Lisa, and Girl With A Pearl Earring out of masking tape. The Japanese artist, who attends Musashino Art University as a painting Major, boasts a collection of around 450 rolls of masking tape. The series originally began as an art project for school, and she received a very good reaction to the work.

The artworks are well-detailed recreations. The patterns of the masking tape create a stimulating visual experience for the viewer. It is surprisingly not overpowering to see tons of brightly coloured roses and polka dots all in such close proximity. What’s astounding is that Funahara is able to find so many different types of tape. Apparently, masking tape in Japan has become an ornamental media, rather than just a tool to block off sections of a painting. According to Spoon and Tamago, each work is around the size of a tatami mat, and each takes about a week to make.

The Van Gogh reproduction of Sunflowers is the most successful work. The tape works well to imitate Van Gogh own style of brushstroke, and the colours are close to the original ones. Even the texture of the tape, sticking slightly out from the canvas, maintains a painterly effect and a kind of weight to the image. (Via Bizarre Beyond Belief)

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Beth Campbell’s Artwork Is Toying With Your Perception

Blue Lamps, 2010

Blue Lamps, 2010

Stereo Table, 2012

Stereo Table, 2012

Bookshelf Loveseat, 2013

Bookshelf Loveseat, 2013

My parent’s bathroom at the house I first lived in had a full-length mirror behind the sink, which also had a mirror.  As soon as I was tall enough to see over the counter, I remember staring at an infinite number of my own reflections bouncing back and forth and I recall the frustration that I could never find where the reflections ended.  This is the memory invoked when I saw Beth Campbell’s work for the first time.

Working in a variety of mediums: drawings, sculpture and what she calls “architectural interventions,” Campbell’s body of work toys with perception.  Her Potential Future Based on Present Circumstances drawing series maps possible outcomes to present decisions.  These were the first works I saw by Campbell and I recall thinking how brilliant, but impossible they were.  Like me and my reflection in the mirror, Campbell was trying to make sense of the unrealistic and perhaps impractical idea that we can know what might have been.  Their humor and neurosis seemed so quintessentially human to me that I became an instant lover of her work.

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The Ghostly Landscapes Of Photographer Martin Vlach Evoke Mystery And Emotion

Martin Vlach - Photography Martin Vlach - Photography Martin Vlach - Photography Martin Vlach - Photography
The landscapes of photographer Martin Vlach emanate a mysterious and melancholic energy. Characterized by ghostly human figures silhouetted against an impenetrable mist, it is like witnessing somebody’s passage into the afterlife; with their backs turned and postures calm, the stoic, nameless people seem to be on the edge of something, hesitating between worlds, gazing into that all-engulfing void beyond which we — the dreaming bystanders — are not permitted to see. As you will notice, Vlach has seamlessly blended surrealist imagery into his photography: whales emerge from the fog, and bodies plummet from the clouds. These surprising elements enhance the series’ theme of liminality and otherworldliness, merging reality with an intangible, heart-wrenching dream.

What makes Vlach’s work so consistently engrossing is the atmosphere. His images are landscapes of emotion and sensorial experience; by empathizing with the distant figures, you can taste the chilled mist in your lungs, smell the rain-wet earth and sea, feel the grass and sand shift beneath you as you traverse the lonely terrain. There is a sense of movement and stillness, solitude and comfort. With the contours of the “real” world obscured in the fog, Vlach creates immersive landscapes that foster our own deeply personal interpretations and emotional engagements.

More of Vlach’s astonishing work can be found on his Tumblr, Instagram, and Flickr. (Via Colossal)

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