Get Social:

Incredible Pumpkin Sculptures At The Great Jack O’ Lantern Blaze

The Great Jack O' Lantern Blaze - Joshua Bousel

The Great Jack O' Lantern Blaze - Joshua Bousel

Photo by Joshua Bousel

The Great Jack O' Lantern Blaze -  Anthony Quintano

Photo by Anthony Quintano

The Great Jack O' Lantern Blaze - Joshua Bousel

Photo by Joshua Bousel

The Great Jack O’Lantern Blaze touts itself as being the Tri-State’s (New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut) biggest and most exciting Halloween event. Their hubris is deserved; The glowing pumpkins and the elaborate installation of carvings are incredible.

The event features more than 5,000 hand-carved, illuminated jack o’ lanterns, and is set against the backdrop of the historic,18th-century riverside landscape of the Hudson River Valley. All displays are made out of pumpkins, and arranged into the likes of giant sea monsters, dinosaurs, snakes, and shrunken “Little Monsters.” It even features a Tunnel O’ Pumpkin Love. (If you’re wondering how that works, it involves gourd-filled Jack-in-the-Boxes springing up and bouncing around.)

Pumpkin carving has a rich history in the UK. The Instagram blog describes it, writing:

Although only associated with Halloween as we know it today since the late 1800s, the tradition of gourd carving dates back to the 18th and 19th centuries in rural Ireland and England. People created jack o’lanterns for the old holidays of Samhain and All Souls’ Night when spirits were thought to be the most active. Grotesque faces carved into the objects were meant to frighten away any ghouls seeking to do harm.

These sculptural displays sound like heaven for anyone that loves hand-carved pumpkins and Halloween. I’m a bit jealous I’m not able to see the Great Jack O’Lantern Blaze in person! If you’re like me and unable to make it to the Blaze, fear not. Visitors are not shy to share their photos on Instagram or Flickr. (Via Colossal. Photos via Josh BouselKimberly QuintanoBryan Haeffele, and Jeremy Bernstein.)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Deconstructed Photography: Joseph Heidecker And Four Other Artists Redefine The Photograph

jh

Joseph Heidecker

Matthew Brandt

Matthew Brandt

Soo Kim

Soo Kim

Nelson Crespo

Nelson Crespo

Since the first photograph, photography has ushered forth in producing a consequential depiction of truths through the containment of fleeting moments in a tangible and archival format. Instances in time are revealed as light falls upon sensitized paper, asserting the presence of each photograph’s content. The picture plane remains uniform, constricted by its own variable, physical dimensions: a synthetic simulacrum of a three-dimensional reality that will forever remain in constant flux. And yet, in spite of presenting elements of proof based within reality, the upheaval of the actual authenticity of the photograph has found itself under siege.

Through a variety of executions, the following artists working with the photographic medium twist this truism in unique and awe-inspiring ways, abolishing preconceived notions of photography through a re-presentation of the photograph. In their reconsideration of the ordinarily static picture plane, form is pushed beyond the confines of the image through the destruction, manipulation or interference of the photograph.

Featured artists include Joseph Heidecker, Matthew Brandt, Soo Kim, Eileen Quinlan and Nelson Crespo.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Fabian Rook Compiles His Holiday Photo Album With The Help Of Google

Fabian Rook - photograph Fabian Rook - photograph Fabian Rook - photograph Fabian Rook - photograph Fabian Rook - photograph

Instead of traditionally traveling the world, photographing the sights with a camera as he roams, Fabian Rook accumulates different snapshots via the comfort of his own home – with the help of his computer and Google. His photographic series is the result of entering key place names into his search bar and documenting where he ended up. By using the online digital tools of these search engines and satellite images to produce Fine Art, Rook is questioning the role of authenticity in image production and selling.

His photos are not dissimilar to those of landscape photographers Stephen Shore and Joel Sternfeld, but have a much different intention behind them, and another way entirely of being produced. Rook says this regarding his purpose:

“By reverting to the auto-produced landscape images taken by Google Street View and by not putting in an appearance of myself either as the author of an image or as an eyewitness, I highlight the meaning of the authorial and witness role in the production of photographic images.” (Source)

He not only exhibits Google-sourced landscape images as the finished project, but also superimposes elements from photojournalism and changes our understanding of what a place is. For example, he takes scenes of protesters from Iran and Greece and replaces them in a new setting of Sao Paulo. Or the street kids we see could either be playing together on the street, or running away from some authoritarian figure. Rook goes on to say:

“The locations and details converge and are exchangeable, while the pictures have the same variability and arbitrary quality that enables the user to switch continent in Google Streetview with a single mouseclick.” (Source)

His images are questionable and ambiguous, and this is his main aim – to point out how untrustworthy these sources are that we take at face value.

Currently Trending

Photography Spotlight- Alva Bernadine

alva bernadine sadie-coffee-tableAlva Bernadine is a British photographer, so dedicated to his craft that he risks his freedom… literally.  He has a new book called Gratuitous Sex and Violence: My Favourites.  The images investigate the violent nature of sex and the sexual nature of violence.  The images make you feel uncomfortable, but command your attention.  Alva is a seasoned veteran, having worked for 25 years as a photographer for many publications like GQ, Elle and Vogue.  Get mesmerized by Alva’s erotic surrealism!

Currently Trending

Made With Color Presents: Scott Anderson’s Paintings Walk The Fine Line Between Abstraction And Representation

Scott Anderson PaintingScott Anderson Painting
Scott Anderson Painting
Once again we’ve teamed up with premiere website building platform Made With Color to bring you exclusive artist features. Each week we join forces to bring you some of the most exciting artists and designers who use Made With Color to create their beautifully designed and user friendly websites. Made With Color doesn’t just help artists create gorgeous websites but allows them to do so in a few minutes without having to touch a line of code. This week we are excited to bring you the work of midwest painter Scott Anderson whose work balances on the fine line between representation and abstraction.
The source material for Scott Anderson’s paintings are preexisting images – found photographs, his own snap shots, drawings or collages – that fall within broad archetypal categories such as portraiture, landscape, iconography, and still life.  The common denominator of these source images is distance, either due to authorship, such as in the found photographs, or time, as in the source imagery of Anderson’s own making.  The act of making new paintings from these images allows Anderson to understand them in new ways and to develop a idiosyncratic visual vocabulary.  In this sense, Scott Anderson is a translator.  What is foregrounded in his work is the way he perceives, organizes, scrambles, and prioritizes the images he makes the paintings from.  The delivery of the message IS the message.  Scott Anderson’s paintings establish an alternate reality in which they are safe to exist as ordinary illuminations of their surroundings.

Although relatively abstract, Anderson’s paintings have their origins in representational imagery.  This dependence on the objective along with his overall motivations put him in dialogue with early Modern art movements, particularly Dada, Surrealism, and Cubism.  Scott Anderson is interested in the continuation of this art historical conversation as a means to change the rules of the game as it were.  Where Modernists of all stripes were largely interested in winning the game by ending it (to paraphrase the critic, Jan Verwoert), Anderson sees this mode of objective / non-objective hybridity as one way among many in which to view the world.

Currently Trending

Chiharu Shiota’s Mesmerizingly Tangled Installation Of Woven Yarn And Keys Explores Global Forms Of Memory And Connection

Chiharu Shiota - Installation Chiharu Shiota - Installation Chiharu Shiota - Installation Chiharu Shiota - Installation

A mesmerizing, surreal experience awaits anyone entering the Japan Pavilion at this year’s Venice Art Biennale. In a stunning installation called “The Key in the Hand,” artist Chiharu Shiota has filled a room with webs of red yarn. Suspended from the ceiling, the yarn is tied together so densely that it filters out the lights above. Hanging from the mass are over 50,000 keys collected from people all over the world. Like dark, frozen drops of rain, they appear to spill from the stringy red “clouds” into two weathered boats below, creating a dual sense of breathtaking movement and suspended time.

Despite their seemingly simple utility, keys are intimate objects that we all carry to keep ourselves—and the things we love—safe. Invested with our deep trust and passed between hands over time, keys symbolically bind us together. The Curator’s Statement for “The Key in the Hand” eloquently describes this further:

In our daily lives, keys protect valuable things like our houses, assets, and personal safety, and we use them while embracing them in the warmth of our hands. By coming into contact with people’s warmth on a daily basis, the keys accumulate countless, multilayered memories that dwell within us. Then at a certain point we entrust the keys, packed with memories, to others who we trust to look after the things that are important to us. (Source)

The keys represent a collection of human feelings, while the yarn visualizes their immaterial connections across time and space. Furthermore, while far removed from their international owners and original purposes, the keys also embody emotions and memories on a transcultural, transnational scale, as they are webbed together without perceptible distinctions of race, class, gender, or nation. As all the keys fall perpetually into the same ancient boats (which are described as “two hands catching a rain of memories”), Shiota’s installation beautifully visualizes a global form of connection spanning borders and generations. (Source). As the Curator’s Statement movingly concludes:

I look forward to watching as The Key in the Hand, an installation that forges a link between a space made up of keys, yarn, and two boats, and photographs and videos of children, transcends national, cultural, linguistic, and political contexts, and emotionally arouses countless visitors from all over the world. (Source)

Born in Japan, Shiota has been based in Berlin for the last two decades. Visit her website to see more fascinating large-scale installations. (Via Colossal)

Currently Trending

Exploring The Los Angeles Art Scene With Me!

EXPLORING THE LOS ANGELES ART SCENE
Somehow along with doing Beautiful/Decay, making my own art and occasionally sleeping, I have also been teaching a class called “Exploring The Los Angeles Art Scene” at UCLA for the last six months. The word “teaching” actually might be a bit misleading as we don’t meet in a classroom, and there are no tests or lectures. It’s more like a series of field trips that we take to some of the most exciting galleries, artist’s studios, and collections in and around Los Angeles. We meet at a new location on the first Saturday of every month and get an insiders view into some of the major (and aspiring major) players in the LA art scene. I never bothered posting about the class on here but it occurred to me that it may be interesting to some of you out there in blog land.

 


Starting in January I’ll be teaching the class once again and visiting a whole slew of new galleries and artists all around town. There are around 25 slots for the class and half are already filled so If you’re looking for something fun to do on Saturday mornings sign up and join professor Amir!

Currently Trending

Benjamin Edmiston

The Escape

Artist Benjamin Edmiston lives & works in Brooklyn, NY and he’s just opened an exhibit on July 2nd at the Infantree Gallery in Lancaster, PA. He produces paintings, drawings, and prints that, according to the artist, “recalls for me the tension of an early, crude Mickey Mouse cartoon, or a misplaced folk sculpture standing eerily on a dusty shelf,” and I’d have to agree.

Currently Trending