Get Social:

Jeff Eisenberg’s Future Forts

Jeff Eisenberg’s ultra detailed drawings are a mix between a bunker, a childhood fort, and a conspiracy theory nuts home in the year 2099.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Théo Gennitsakis’s Type Magic

Wonderfully inventive illustrated typography by artist, illustrator, graphic designer Théo Gennitsakis.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Shocking Photos Capture The Last Remnants Of China’s Painful Foot Binding Tradition

foot binding foot binding foot binding Jo-Farrell-Photography-4

Her toes were broken when she was a kid, then constantly bound to make them smaller until she couldn’t walk straight anymore. At the age of 88, Zhang Yun Ying is among the last witnesses of China’s infamous tradition of foot binding.

It has been recently brought to attention by a British photographer Jo Farrell who is already known for documenting endangered traditions and cultures. Her ongoing project “Living History” captures the lives of some of the last remaining women in China with bound feet. According to Farrell, in the past year alone, three women she’s been documenting have passed away so she feels it is “imperative to focus on recording their lives before it is too late”.

Tiny feet (with the ideal being no bigger than 3 to 4 inches) were once considered to be the symbol of beauty and social status. Young women would crush and bind their feet hoping to marry into money. Concealing the bound foot from men’s eyes also instigated an erotic approach towards it. Even though the inhumane custom was banned in 1912 by Chinese government, it was still practiced behind closed doors.

Apart from showcasing the shocking photos to the public, Farrell wants to make a point that modern women are not so different from the elders she works with:

“In every culture there are forms of body modification that adhere to that cultures’ perception of beauty. From Botox, FGM, breast augmentation, scarring and tattooing, to rib removals, toe tucks and labrets.”

The project was successfully funded on Kickstarter and will hopefully develop into a full documentary. (via The Huffington Post)

Currently Trending

Mary Anne Kluth’s Visitor Center

Mary Anne Kluth’s Visitor Center project is a multi-layered series involving ceramic rocks, talks with her geologist father, and detailed dioramas. Here is a description of the project in the artists own words:

My recent work is a conceptual project which began with a simple exercise. I asked my geologist father to describe the formal attributes of his favorite rocks from his collection, which he has been amassing over his entire 40-year career. Then I made ceramic models based only on his descriptions, having no other specific knowledge of the originals. Once I had these ceramic “abstracted rocks”, I then asked my dad to guess which rock sample matched up with which ceramic piece, and got him to tell me basic stories about the places he found each original. I then made dioramas to re-create the scenes he described, and took photographs to document these simulations.

The final presentation is a faux-museum, displaying the c-prints and ceramics alongside the language we used to create them, as well as watercolors made from the original rock samples my dad was thinking of, and infographic paintings elaborating on the ideas and conversations sparked by the process.

Currently Trending

Awesome Video Of The Day: Paralyzed Artist Benny Diar’s Bodypainting NSFW

Benny Diar is a true inspiration. Even though Benny became paralyzed a few years back from a bad car accident he is keeping things positive and pushing forward. Recently he’s been getting back into the swing of things with art. Using his mouth to hold a brush Benny has been creating paintings on any and every surface he can find, including the human body. Check out the video of him doing some body painting on tattoo model Malice McMunn after the jump. Keep up the good work Benny and thanks for reminding us to live each day to the fullest and to not let anything get in our way.

Currently Trending

Ruud Van Empel’s Modern Surrealistic Digital Collages Awaken The Spirit Of His Flemish Ancestors

Ruud Van Empel - digital collage Ruud Van Empel - digital collage Ruud Van Empel - digital collage Ruud Van Empel - digital collage

Dutch artist Ruud Van Empel is following in the footsteps of his Flemish ancestors and is creating some pretty confronting portraits. He digitally collages images of innocent, wide eyed children into environments of lush, hyper-colored, tropical forests, ponds and gardens. While his pictures are in no doubt beautiful and aesthetically pleasing, there is definitely something unsettling about them. The children seem a bit out of place – staring a bit too intensely at the camera as if they were possessed or hypnotized. Everything seems a bit too perfect, a bit too beautiful.

Van Empel sometimes spends weeks collating images from multiple sources to build one digital portrait. The reason his portraits seem so weird is because they are pictures of people that don’t really exist. This is a bit of an insight into his process:

First he collects all the features he needs by shooting a variety of young models in his studio and by subsequently wandering through Dutch forests, in search of fine leaves, perfect branches and the right waters. Only to tear it apart and spend weeks reconstructing it all until both the person and the setting match his desired standard of photo-realism. (Source)

It can also not go unnoticed that a majority of the kids in Van Empel’s photography are black. The artist himself grew up in a small Dutch village with a large white population. He speaks more about this influencing his work:

I grew up in a small Catholic town in the south of the Netherlands. There was only one black boy in my primary school class. In the portrait Generation 1 I expressed this situation. It shows a white class with just one black pupil. With World#1 I decided to work with more black children. It set off a whole new series of work. First I thought of portraying a girl in a dirty, old and torn-up dress, as if she were very poor. I suppose this idea popped up in my head because of the image we westerners are often given. I didn’t really like that idea though, and decided to give them the clothes my generation wore when we were kids, especially because those clothes looked very innocent to me. (Source)

Van Empel is currently exhibiting at Wagner + Partner Gallery in Berlin, Germany, until June 13th.

Currently Trending

Takeuchi Taijin for Olympus

A while back, we posted Takeuchi Taijin’s amazing Wolf & Pig stop motion animation. His latest clip for Olympus PEN Giant follows a young man navigating an urban city-scape in a similar stop-motion journey through 355 stunning photographs printed billboard size! No tricks or computer animation…just good old fashioned hard work. Check it out!

Currently Trending

Jesus Leguizamo’s Glitchy Paintings Are Realistic Yet Abstract

Jesus Leguizamo - Painting

Jesus Leguizamo - Painting Jesus Leguizamo - Painting

Jesus Leguizamo - Painting

Colombian painter Jesus Leguizamo combines realistic elements of portraiture with abstract, creating surreal pieces that sing with emotion. His paintings look almost like oil-on-canvas renditions of glitch art, his subjets interrupted with splotches of colors and smears of paint.

Leguizamo’s paintings feel like intimate peeks into someone’s emotional state of mind, and his expressive brushstrokes seem to convey a raw sense of confusion or mental tumult. There’s a dynamism to his paintings, as though they’re a motion capture camera snapping just one frame of his subject. According to Saatchi Art, Leguizamo explores human fragility with “his depictions of people [that] erases and blurs that which defines the human being – the face. ” (via I Need a Guide)

Currently Trending