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The Seven Deadly Sins In The Artwork Of Gurt Swanenberg

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Taking cues from a 17th century practice known as taolennou, Gurt Swanenberg creates a new series of compelling sculptures. The original idea of taolennou was intended to provoke awareness of the seven deadly sins to a largely illiterate population through visual imagery.
Swanenberg takes the same idea and brings it into the present. Using various animal skulls he paints commercial logos related to each of the seven sins and makes statement about how they’re interpreted in the present day. Ideas such as gluttony are depicted on a pig skull with junk food logos painted on it. Wrath shows violent imagery on a lion head skull which includes gun and nazi references.
Even though the skeletons are painted Swanenberg takes references from sticker culture and collage. His overall aesthetic uses anthropology with brand name culture to comment on society’s ills. The original seven deadly sins surfaced around the 14th century. It was put forth by the Catholic Church to call awareness to man’s tendency to sin in the areas mentioned. According to the church there are two types of sin; venial which is relatively minor and the more serious mortal or deadly which is considered to compromise the grace and charity of a person’s nature. (via supersonic)

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Anna Geerdes

Scottish artist Anna Geerdes‘s paintings focus on map landscapes, as she presents fields stitched together and filled with ants for a fantastical and surreal series entitled The Utopia Project. More images from the series, which was featured at the Royal Scottish Academy in 2010, after the jump.

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Human Highway – The Sound

Actually quite a simple video and concept, but it has the key elements that I’m personally into: shapes and floating faces underneath a retro fuzz. Director Olivier Groulx also worked on a video and website concepts for Arcade Fire.

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Intimate Photos of Young Teens Moshing

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The kids in Emily Stein’s photographs of mosh pits at concerts are totally free. It’s fascinating that teens – who we all know are notoriously self-conscious – are able to let go to such a wild extent. At the same time, it is not at all surprising, as when are you wilder than in your teenage years? Stein captures the gamut of experiences: intense energy, happiness, rapture, contentedness, trance and goofiness.

If you’ve ever moshed, you know it’s a one of a kind experience. The energy can become very aggressive, but people are almost always responsible and friendly. You can be shoved violently by the same person who lends you a hand to pull you back up off the floor. It’s a great release of energy and opportunity for expression without judgment. You can flail and hurl yourself any way you want, and no one will call you on insanity, because they’re all in it with you. It’s beautiful to see the teenagers so enrapt in the experience. Stein’s photocomposition is candid and not overly calculated, probably because of the nature of the project. It’s exciting when you find the half-hidden expression of some head-banging preteen thoroughly enjoying their epic Saturday night.

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Pierre Bolide

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From what I can tell, Pierre Bolide likes a few things: Space. Raging vein mutant muscles. And imaginary feuds with Chuck Norris. The only way I can describe these are like fan club illustrations of a long lost Nintendo video game that totally ruled and I played so much I saw the shapes on the back of my eyelids when I went to sleep at night, or some totally awesome TMNT (Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles) spin-off series based on one of  Shredder’s obscure, but totally awesome minions. Found on B/D’s very own Creative Pic Pool!

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Marion Fayolle’s Whimsically Erotic Comic Illustrations

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French illustrator Marion Fayolle‘s illustrations are light-heartedly simple and provocative. Maria Popova appropriately compares Fayolle’s aesthetic to Codex SeraphinianusGregory Blackstock’s illustrated lists, and the vignettes of Blexbolex, but I think there’s also some similar absurdism to be found in Joan Cornellà as well. Fayolle’s illustrations are visually comic poetry, each one representing a surreal and nuanced narrative. Bodies and body parts are often replaced, removed, or erotically recontextualized, something that could be jarring to viewers, but Fayolle’s whimsical aesthetic undermines any potential grotesqueness of this concept. Though her work is playful, the tension between humor, longing, lust, loss, and separation is palpable and creates a space for the viewer to revel in the narrative possibilities in each illustration. It’s the fragmentation of these narratives that connects them, allowing for a cohesion of and engagement with particular themes. Fayolle published a book of her comic illustrations, called “In Pieces,” last September. (via brain pickings)

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Documentary Watch: Bela

 

“Bela” is a short documentary  which follows the day in the life of a street performer named Bela Erdei or “the cat man”. Bela, a recognizable face to some, travels hours by train throughout the south of France to perform with his affectionate house cats. An affable and eccentric character who has a real passion for what he does. Watch the full documentary after the jump.

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Early Record Covers By The Prince Of Pop Art, Andy Warhol

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Before he was the Prince of Pop Art and arguably the biggest art star on the planet, Andy Warhol was one of the most sought-after graphic illustrators in Manhattan. Years before he designed two of Rock and Roll’s most iconic album covers, Warhol was responsible for a series of recently recovered Jazz record covers for Count Bassie, Thelonious Monk and Moondog.

Rendered in his then-trademark ‘blotted line’ style (a technique Warhol mastered before screenprinting, where a single line of heavy, beaded ink was drawn on one sheet of paper, and then pressed against another which created a blotted monoprint), these whimsical and funky covers graced some of the best jazz albums of the 1950’s.  The quality of Warhol’s highly trained freehand drawings separated him from other commercial illustrators of the day, but one of his many secret weapons was his mother’s gorgeous script writing, seen heavily in the looping, colorful script featured on The Story of Moon Dog (above). Warhol employed his mother’s lovely writing to essentially double his work-load, a precursor to his loose-authorship creative policy that would become commonplace later in his Factory days. (via dangerous minds)

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