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The Gruesome Artwork Of Sarah Best Will Give You Goosebumps

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The artist Sarah Best creates astounding replicas of the female body, using it as a symbol that tracks the human desire for connection and intimacy; severed from the rest of the body, her sculpted hands and a cut-out collaged breasts take on a life of their own, worming their way up walls and pages and sometimes tracking blood in the process. The work, though sometimes gruesome, maintains a pulsating beauty; as if with clear intentions, her vital sculptures navigate space, dangling from hooks and exploring piles of cloth.

From both a feminist and an aesthetic standpoint, Best’s work operates in a miraculous, subversive manner; the feminist philosopher Susan Bordo, for example, writes that the body, coded female, is often seen as passive and lacking in intellect, explaining that therefore the body alone has the power to challenge those sexist ideas. Positioning parts of the body within cubistic collages and arresting installations, Best allows it to transcend societal definitions. Rather than figuring as part of a whole to be admired and objectified, limbs actively seek out understanding of the outside world, touching and feeling everything in their paths.

Wonderfully vulnerable yet undeniably powerful, female arm bears Christ-like stigmata, and the physical body searches for spiritual meaning. The oppressive boundaries between the corporeal self— too often considered to be unintelligent, immoral, and “feminine—” and the elevated metaphysical self are effectively shattered, and a new kind of humanity begins to emerge, one to which we can all relate, one that is beautifully desirous, yearning, and sometimes lonesome.

I got the amazing chance to speak with Best, and when I asked what advice she’d give to aspiring artists, she simply said, “Keep your integrity. You will only count, for yourself and in your art, to the extend that you keep your integrity.” Take a look.

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Studio Visit: David Ball’s Fantastic Fantasy Worlds

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David Ball creates the kind of art you need to see in person, so you can get right up close to every piece and fully immerse yourself into the fine details of his fantastic fantasy worlds. I’m forever in awe of his mixed-media collages and I’m always trying to figure out how he makes all his works look like paintings, even though I thoroughly know that they’re assembled from thousands of magazine clippings. At least some of the photos below by Shaun Roberts give a rare glimpse into David’s unique and beautiful process, that makes my brain simply explode with joy. And right now, I’m just super jealous of every art fiend living San Francisco, since David will be featured in the group exhibit “Harum Scarum” at 111 Minna Gallery that opens on February 2nd and runs until February 25th.

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Yago Hortal’s Fluid Paint

Sometimes thick juicy paint, photoshop quality gradients, and fluid abstractions are all you need in art. Such is the case with Yago Hortal’s work.

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Vesa Lehtimäki’s Photographs Of Star Wars Toys Will Make You Think They Are The Real Thing

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The Star Wars Millenium Falcon doesn’t exist in real life, but you’d never know it by looking at Finnish artist Vesa Lehtimäki (aka Avanaut)’s photographs. In his work, you can spot a Y-Fighter parked among trees,  a clear view of ships in outer space, and action shots of some of your favorite characters . Lehtimäki borrowed his son’s toys to photograph and later Photoshop them into their own believably unbelievable situations. They look so life-like you’d think that these small objects are actually a 1:1 reproduction.

The artist has been a life-long fan of the Star Wars franchise. In an interview with Wired, he talks recalls the impact it had on him.  “Two of the great moments of my childhood were the first two original Star Wars movies,” says Lehtimäki. “As a kid I wanted to become a movie director. I made some Super 8 movies but it did not work out that well.” He’s an illustrator and designer, and sees these photographs as a way to explore an unfulfilled career path. (Via Gizmodo)

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Andrew Sutherland

Luke Stephenson

Glue must be sculptor Andrew Sutherland’s best friend. Objects falling victim to its liquid strength are made from paper: New York Times’ made to look like a from cradle to grave stump of wood, cardboard cut out to create strange optical illusions, newspapers combined with thread and zippers for a lightweight sleeping bag.

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Richard Nicholson’s Last One Out, Please Turn On The Light

As digital technology takes over analog traditions it becomes harder to keep alive the tried and true methods of yesteryear. Case in point, analog photography. This is why British photographer Richard Nicholson began documenting the few remaining professional dark rooms in London before they  all slowly disappeared and were replaced with high resolution digital cameras and massive digital printers. Will these labs one day only live in history museums and through the work of such photographers such as Richard? Only time will tell.

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Artaksiniya

These beautiful drawings by Artaksiniya incorporate aspects of collage and fashion illustration.

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Sarah Cameron Sunde Stands In The Ocean For 12 Hours Letting The Tide Rise And Fall Over Her Body

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Artist Sarah Cameron Sunde’s recent performance project 36.5 is what she refers to as a “durational performance with the sea”. In this project, she stands in an urban bay for the duration of a full tidal cycle, during which the water envelops her body and then recedes, while she remains still. The whole process takes 12 to 13 hours, during which she does not shift her position. This underlines the major role of time in her work, which she refers to as a “time based art project” At first glance 36.5 looks like a display of great endurance but, it goes beyond this, in the sense that her endurance comes with a message.

Sunde is staging a commentary on the relationship we have with water as individuals and on a greater scale as a civilization. She illustrates the rapid change of climate, as well as the impact we have on water and the impact it has on us. Her project is deeply anchored in the notions of time and change which she materializes by her presence within the process of the changing tide. Through this, she also aims to examine the “temporary nature of things”, such as the changing tides, or our physical existence. Her project is all the more interesting in due to the fact that she allows and encourages the audience to participate, thus creating a dialogue and underlining the significance and impact of such a piece. She has the plan to make her project go global in order to paint a bigger picture on an international level.

Sarah Cameron Sunde’s 36.5 has already taken place in Main, Mexico and California and will be taking place in Amsterdam and Venice .Photographs by Gus Ford and Irina Patkanian

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