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Catherine Nelson’s Incredible Digital Floating Worlds

Catherine Nelson is a visual artist who uses the digital medium to create orbital worlds of  imaginary landscapes. Her ‘Future Memories’ series comprises of 20 floating worlds, meticulously composed with thousands of assembled details. Visual poetry, nature photography and digital techniques blend together to give shape to these transcendental landscapes. The result is a contemporary pictorial mythology that subtly reminds the viewer of a profound truth: that it is in the flourishing variety of the local that the fate of the world resides.

Trained as a painter in Sydney and London and with years of experience in the creation of visual effects for feature films like Moulin Rouge and Harry Potter, she now has dedicated her skills to her own art work combining the techniques from both these worlds into a new contemporary art medium.

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Celestial Soul Portraits

Celestial Soul Portraits
A little TGIF fun…Mr. Erial Ali is proud to offer the unique *magical* service of creating a Celestial Soul Portrait of YOU (and maybe also your family?). I’m curious who’d pay upwards of $250 for this. Is my soul even worth that much money?? Click more to see before and afters.

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Kumi Yamashita’s Shadow Art Creates Stories from Shadows

Kumi Yamashita - Installation

Kumi Yamashita - Installation

Kumi Yamashita - Installation

Kumi Yamashita - Installation

Kumi Yamashita’s work is nothing without light and shadow. By subtly manipulating materials such as paper, fabric and wood, she uses strategic lighting to create shadow art installations. Yamashita focuses on the human figure and proves that an attention to detail make all the difference. She makes tiny cuts to paper and carefully drapes fabric. Coupled with a careful consideration of folding and lighting, these pieces are a feat of engineering. A minimal amount of material creates a narrative with a range of emotions. Yamashita writes about her work, stating:

I sculpt using light and shadow. I construct single or multiple objects and place them in relation to a single light source. The complete artwork is therefore comprised of both the material (the solid objects) and the immaterial (the light or shadow).

Veil (directly above) is one of Yamashita’s newest works. This piece uses fabric, light and shadow to depict a female figure laying down. Looking at it, with the spotlight shines perfectly on a sheet of fabric. It feels like we’re looking at a ghost, but it isn’t unnerving or spooky. Instead, it feels sensual, like we are the voyeur to a private time; It’s a memory. Environment, in this case, is also important to the piece. Installed on a pedestal and devoid of adjacent works, it is isolated, making it feel even more like a moment in time.

Yamashita is an engineer, creating incredible forms that are realistically rendered. They aren’t blocky or awkwardly composed; her silhouettes are very fluid. At different vantage points, you wouldn’t think that a seated figure came from a sheet of paper. But once you do, it instantly elevates her shadows. The amount of craft put in each installation is inspired.

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Joel Galvin

Joel Galvin 

Joel Galvin, or Ventral Is Golden (origin: late Middle English : from Latin venter, ventr- ‘belly’ + -al . Thanks Dictionary.) uses a plethora of different medium. Wonderfully, they all seem to correlate with each other. Perhaps it’s just how odd and familiar they are.

 

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Choi Xooang Depicts Hyperrealist Human Sculptures To Extract Collective Emotions

Choi Xooang - Sculpture 4 Choi Xooang - Sculpture 3 Choi Xooang - Sculpture 2 Choi Xooang - Sculpture 1

Naked hyperrealist sculptures made out of polymer clay. South Korean artist, Choi Xooang, uses the human naked body as a mean to express pure emotions. The artist doesn’t represent his personal state, he is trying to extract collective emotions.

Choi Xooang manipulates the outcome of his sculptures, enabling us to relate faster to the point he is making. It’s easier for most of us to connect with a human body than a painting, or an abstract sculpture. The characters are bold and skinny. Attributes that accentuate our vulnerability. The artist, by using these shortcuts, has us standing in front of his pieces with all our fragility and our compassion at the surface.

The purpose of Choi Xooang is twofold. He is presenting his humanistic vision of the world. Human emotions are the only thing that were given to a man and a woman apart from their social status in a capitalistic society. Therefore, he has chosen to show through his art, the most intense and dark emotions an individual can come across such as fear, sadness, desire, sexual tensions and relationship confusions. If this process is not clear when facing the sculptures, the realization that something is touching us deeply eventually happens.

We might not know exactly what it is. The weird combination of animals and humans, the poses of same sex characters, the suggestive poses and the non expressive stares have us reflect internally. We are seeing in this sculptures what we are feeling inside. It might not be obvious at first, and we might not know what detail sold us out, but we are. (via Juxtapoz).

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Andreas Laszlo Konrath

Andreas Laszlo Konrath‘s beautiful photographs of youth gone wild.

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Book 3 Iphone Sneak Peak!

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Sorry for the bad iphone photographs but I wanted to give all of you a nice sneak peak into our next issue! This advance copy just flew in by way of of our friends at Fedex and it’s looking like our best issue to date! Book 3 features over 100 artists and designer from around the world who created images around the theme “The Underdogs.” If you’re looking for a book to inspire you and get your creative juices flowing then this is the book for you! This issue will be available at the end of March and will be offered in a limited edition of 1,500. Make sure to subscribe today as this issue WILL SELL OUT! More images after the Jump!

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Drew Mosley Three-Dimensional Forest Critters Come Alive In Layers Of Resin

Drew Mosley - Mixed MediaDrew Mosley - Mixed MediaDrew Mosley - Mixed Media

Drew Mosley - Mixed Media

Canadian artist Drew Mosley paints vivid scenes of anthropomorphic animals on layers and layers of resin. Being an artist and a carpenter, his work contains layers of resin that sit inside custom made wooden frames. Being surrounded by incredible nature in his hometown of Ontario, he draws inspiration from the breathtaking beauty of the wild. The little forest creatures he depicts in his artwork are no doubt animals that he has come across on hikes or in daily life. Drew Mosley’s furry friends look like characters from a storybook, with lots of personality and quirky qualities. Although the critters are wild, they act somewhat like humans by carrying objects such as traveling packs and flags.

Drew Mosley creates in depth atmospheres by painting on individual layers of resin. Each animal almost seems to be popping out of its lush habitat, appearing three-dimensional. Even the feathers of the owl seem to be standing straight up, creating a very real sense of volume and shape. By using this technique, the artist renders extremely realistic textures of fur, feathers, twigs, and leaves. Many of his dioramas include found objects that sit right in the resin, jutting out from the piece. In Mosley’s work titled The Egg Thief, a real quail egg is included in the composition, making the entire piece look all the more realistic. The artist also being a carpenter, he creates sculptures and installations of his wild critters. (via Colossal)

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