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Meg Adamson

Portland artist Meg Adamson’s work is delicate without coming off as forced or mechanical. This dynamic reflects her natural, organic subject matter very well. She is participating in PangeaSeed’s Great Artist Migration benefit tour, which begins in July.

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Star Wars Imperial Forces Invade And Pillage Thomas Kinkade Paintings

Jeff Bennett - Digital Painting Jeff Bennett - Digital Painting Jeff Bennett - Digital Painting

It’s really easy to hate on Thomas Kinkade. His landscape paintings, which boasts themselves as “paintings of light,” are dull, wooden, and nearly all the same. Wholly uninteresting, Kinkade’s paintings beg to have a little pizzaz added to them. Luckily, artist Jeff Bennett has solved this problem. He’s added the Star Wars Imperial Forces to Kinkade’s work. Storm Troopers, Star Destroyers, and more invade the candle-lit houses, babbling brooks, and flower gardens. Houses are set on fire and landscaping is trampled. And, throughout it all, you are cheering for the historically “bad guys.”

Bennett’s keen Photoshop skills allow him to seamlessly integrate the two worlds, making them believable and thus very entertaining.  In a way, this series mimics the typical good vs. evil story. The exception is that who we perceive as good and evil is turned on its head. You’d think that tranquil Thomas Kinkade paintings would be harmless. But think again. Kinkade, with his lowest common denominator work, overpriced and mass produced chachkies, and greed (in 2006, his company was convicted of defrauding two Virginia gallery owners), is really the bad guy in this scenario. The Imperial Forces are helping destroy banality. (Via Adweek).

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A Sidewalk Transformed Into A Waterbed

La ville molle (part III) from Raum Raum on Vimeo.

Ever wonder what would happen if the ground you’re used to walking on had the consistency of a waterbed? Well French artist collective Raum has and decided to create a pavement that wiggles, waves and reacts to movement much liked the beloved 80’s bedroom staple, the waterbed. Collaborating with the National Art School of Bourges and the FRAC Centre, a slice of pavement-like material was filled with water on a regular street transforming the mundane patch of land into a fluid wonderland where every step meets not so stable reaction. The project, called “La Ville Molle” (The Soft City) questions the stability of the city and it’s ability to change and accommodate motion and evolution. We’re not sure if the world is ready for endless sidewalks filled with water just yet but this sure does look like a fun project that makes you rethink your environment and the permanent nature of the stable ground that we all take for granted.

Watch a video of the fluid “La Ville Molle” in action above and watch a short “making of” video after the jump to see how you can make your very own waterbed sidewalk! (via)

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Mike Stefanini

Classic typography with a twist, slick illustrations, and just the right amount of humor go into all the works in the portfolio of Parisian designer and illustrator Mike Stefanini A.K.A Atomike Studio.

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Paco Peregrín’s Photography Transforms High Fashion Models Into “Beautiful Monsters”

Paco Peregrín - Fashion Photography Paco Peregrín - Fashion Photography Paco Peregrín - Fashion Photography Paco Peregrín - Fashion Photography

Paco Peregrín is an international photographer who creates experimental characters out of high-fashion images. This particular series is entitled Beautiful Monster, which Peregrín directed with the intention of exploring the effect of makeup on identity:

All photos that integrate Beautiful Monster allude to a very particular concept of beauty (sometimes unusual, alien or even beautifully monstrous), to its ephemeral nature and the passage of time. Naked men and women are on a neutral background where makeup comes great prominence, even avoiding the recognition of the models, thus reflecting on the idea of identity and a proposal for the makeup as a contemporary mask that protects us, on the one hand like a camouflage, [and on] the other helping us to build a super-ego. (Source)

Peregrín’s “Monsters” are fascinating, radiating with acid-bright color and cryptic eroticism. Most often nude, their faces are bound and adorned with rope, tape, paint, and jewels. Something happens when their features are obscured — their expressive bodies appear almost inhuman. In a style best described as hyper-real futurism, the images speak directly to a postmodern society so obsessed with beauty and constructed identities that it slips into beautiful absurdity.

Given that fashion photography is often criticized as being wholly commercialized and thus heavily restricted, Peregrín’s unique style is doubly surprising; he has worked with big names such as Chanel, Diesel, Vogue, and Vanity Fair, but still manages to bring his own creative and unconventional vision into his works. Check out his website for a gallery of his immersive and consistently experimental projects. (Via Art Fucks Me)

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Edvard Scott

Was perusing FAIRspot the other day and discovered Edvard’s Scott’s hypertastic digital extravaganzas. They look like mystical maps to strange new (video game) worlds. Fairspot also recently did an in depth interview with Edvard, you can read it here.

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Max Streicher’s Massive Inflatable Sculptures

Inflatables have had an important place in Max Streicher’s work since 1989. In most of his sculptures and installations he has used industrial fans and simple valve mechanisms to animate sewn forms with lifelike gestures. His use of light and papery materials, like Tyvek (and more recently nylon spinnaker), have been significant to the character of their development, specifically to his focus on movement. The weightlessness of this material allows it to respond with surprising subtlety to the action of air within it. Streicher uses air to animate his work because it provides an effortless naturalism. It not only looks right, it feels right, recollecting our sensation of breath.

Inflatables are the medium of enchantment, fantasy and optimism, but things do go wrong. Take the Hindenburg, for example. Macy’s Parade balloon characters occasionally crash into the crowd. In Streicher’s work the distress behind the whimsy takes different forms. Scale is one factor. The giants, for example, are intended to overwhelm. In contrast to similar commercial counterparts, they are out of control. They appear to struggle, but why and to what end? However that sense of disruption is read also depends on what the individual viewer brings to the work. For some, gasping for breath, endlessly straining to rise, portray an image of playfulness, and even resurrection, while for others it is distinctly an image of torture. Both cases however involve physical empathy, a bodily recognition of the elemental—powerful and tenuous—forces that animate us all. (via)

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Made With Color Presents: Britton Tolliver’s Deconstructed Grid Paintings

Britton Tolliver painting

Britton Tolliver painting

Britton Tolliver painting

This week we’re bringing you another talented artist as part of our partnership with premiere website building platform Made With Color. Each week we bring you some of the most exciting artists and designers working today who are using Made With Color to create clean and sleek websites. Made With Color sites aren’t just easy on the eyes but feature powerful yet simple backend which allows anyone to create a professional site with just a few clicks.This week we are excited to share the layered paintings of Los Angeles based painter Britton Tolliver.

Where does abstraction and geometry meet? In what field do they cease to be independent systems and gel into one hybrid – something new altogether? Britton Tolliver’s idiosyncratic paintings are deeply rooted in this intersection. Neither solely abstract nor geometric, his paintings really entertain another idea, which is difficult to pin down. It is in the amalgamation of these different ideas and processes that Tolliver’s paintings find their own identity, somewhere in the middle of both.

See more of Britton’s works after the jump or in person on may 22nd at LAND’s group show “Painting In Place” in Los Angeles and in a three person show at Samuel Freeman Gallery in June.

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