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Yosigo

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There is something in Spanish photographer Yosigo’s (aka: Jose Javier Serrano) work that allows him to present beauty within emptiness. His minimalistic style presents itself even within the subject matter. He focuses on ordinary, everyday surroundings that are extremely sparsely populated. I also enjoyed his collection of found photo IDs titled, Aurkitutako Erretratuak.

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Subverted Embroidered Candy Bar Logos Reveal A Darker Side To The Sweet Stuff

candy bar Embroidery

candy bar

candy bar Embroidery candy bar Embroidery candy bar Embroidery

I’m sure most of us have a love of chocolate and confectionery – sometimes indulging ourselves a little, and sometimes we binge, purge and gorge our way to diabetes with the sweet stuff. Embroidery artist Charlotte Bailey of Hanging By A Thread has taken her obsession to a healthier place. Instead of eating the chocolate and candy bars, she has been reworking the logos and house hold brand names of the sweets with colorful, eye-catching embroidery thread. Bailey ever-so-slightly changes the wording of the labels to allude to the darker side of the confectionery industry.

Hershey’s is now changed to Hurtey’s; Milky Bar to Guilty Bar; Oreo to Ohno; Cadbury to Calories. The embroidered pieces are loaded with emotionally charged messages that remind us of the seriousness of an eating disorder. Bailey taps into the thought processes that pass through people’s heads when thinking of buying their next candy fix.

She points out the scary subtext that is always there with any kind of confectionery, or actually with any commodity that is superfluous to our needs. We are always being told to buy more; need more. Whether it’s the style of the attractive packaging and optimistic-looking font, or the level of sugar content in the product, we are always left wanting more.

And if you want more of Bailey’s clever designs, the collection of embroideries are on display at Menier Gallery in London from 28th July – 2nd August 2015.

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Ekta’s Heads


Ekta‘s simple yet elegant portraits are a great example of what can happen when careful color selection, refined composition, and carefully selected patterning come together to make an image.

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Faif’s Street Art Criticism

I’m loving the work of Barcelona, Spain based street artist Faif as of late. He’s recently been taking some well pointed jabs at the art world, street art, and pop culture as a whole with his wonky works on the street. Lets hope he keeps it up and other graffiti artists/street artists follow his lead  to never take what they do too serious. (via)

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Helmut Smits

Helmut Smits is proof that you don’t need a larger than life idea to create thought provoking and powerful work. From a kiddie pool fountain (pictured above) to a snow man carved out of carrara marble (pictured after the jump), Helmut takes everyday objects, makes a few minor tweaks, and creates iconic work that makes you think “why didn’t I think of that?”

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David Ellis And 5 Other Artists Transform Trash Into Dynamic Works Of Art

David Ellis

David Ellis

Tim Noble and Sue Webster

Tim Noble and Sue Webster

Gabriel Kuri

Gabriel Kuri

 

Artists are magicians in their own right for making something from nothing, for infusing the everyday mundane tools and objects with poetic meaning and creating a whole new experience from it.  In the holiday season, with a good part of society taking part in excess shopping, people are becoming increasingly conscious of what we discard.  Our relationship to the accumulation of stuff and the level of waste humans produce seems to be collectively shifting.  The artists whose work is shared here: David Ellis, Vik Muniz, Gabriel Kuri, Song Dong, Tim Noble and Sue Webster demonstrate the way individual artistic voices arise from this consciousness and the beautiful and often magical work that is informed by our accumulated or discarded stuff.

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Heartbreaking, Beautiful Images Of Elderly Animals

Handsome One, Thoroughbred Horse, Age 33

Rooster, Age Unknown

Red, Chow Mix, Age 14+

Violet, Potbellied Pig, Age 12

When her mother was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease, the photographer Isa Leshko faced the prospect of her own aging process and ultimately her own death; in refusing to photograph her family during that time, she retreated to farms where elderly animals were housed and photographed them for her series Elderly Animals. Many were rescued from factory farms where they had been genetically modified, abused, and they were therefore facing premature death; others were part of their caregiver’s families and always had been. Like she would with a human subject, the artist spent hours with her subjects, communing with them on straw beds and sometimes visiting them multiple times.

In the iconic Camera Lucida, Roland Barthes meditates on the poignancy of photographic memory, writing, “Whether or not the subject is already dead, every photograph is this catastrophe.” The well-seen photograph fixes a moment within the space between light and shadow, reminding viewers that the exact instant pictured can never be recreated. In her rich black and white tones, Leshko realizes the potential of her camera to make permanent her elderly bestial subjects, and in the process of remembering each creature, the viewer is forced to recognize his or her eventual death.

The artist writes in her artist’s statement, “I have come to realize that these images are self-portraits,” uniting the living, the aged, and the deceased under a single canopy of mortal experience. Within the glimmers of the blind bovine eyes, the bare bones of the rooster wings, the grey snouts and balding patches of fur, we might all recognize what we must someday leave behind, and we are forced to search for what remains within Leshko’s thoughtful frame. (via HuffPost)

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Adeline Mai Explores Profound Intimacy Inn Her Breathtaking Nudes

Adeline Mai - PhotographyAdeline Mai - PhotographyAdeline Mai - Photography

Like looking into the private thoughts of a diary, photographer Adeline Mai creates narratives of intimacy, portraying poetic scenes of human interaction.  In her body of work, she creates ethereal images of profound closeness between her subjects.  With titles like J’ai Embrassé L’Aube D’Été, French for I Embraced the Summer Dawn, Weightlessness, and Dirty Weekend, the names of each series are just as lyrical as the photographs itself. The Parisian artist captures stunning images of contorting bodies, displaying breathtaking views of the human body. In her series I Embraced the Summer Dawn, each photograph contains a stark emptiness except for the two, nude figures beautifully entwined as if they are attempting to become one body. This same sense of intimacy is embodied in her series Dirty Weekend. Only instead of gracefully posed, flawless bodies, we are now given a view of a more natural nudity, out in the woods and in more candid positions. Mai not only captures a playful kind of nakedness, but a shared closeness between clothed subjects as well.  She is a master at capturing tender moments between her subjects and laying them out for all to see.

Mai having the ability to brilliantly capture light on her subjects, her series Weightlessness includes floating figures with soft, warm light consuming their surroundings. These figures appear to be floating, but they are actually underwater! The photographer has turned this normally cool-colored environment into a glow of yellows, reds, and oranges. Adeline Mai’s entrancing photography pulls you in to its intimate scenes of magnificent nudes being swallowed up by a sea of color or by human embrace.

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