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Fra.Biancoshock Insists His Street Interventions Are Not ‘Street Art’

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Fra.Biancoshock insists he is not a street artist, but rather the Milan-based experientialist noticed that his street-level installations and interventions spoke using the same language as Street Art. In regards to the movement of Street Art in regards to his work, the mysterious, identity-protecting Fra. says, “For me, that phrase is a provocation: I have not studied art, I do not frequent artistic circles, or amicidell’amicodelcuginodelfratellodelsuoamico … And I have no particular technical and artistic skills. I just have ideas and I like to strain my mind in trying to propose to the common people through what I call “Unconventional Experiences.” I think mine are “experiences” rather than works of art.”

With ties and intentions closer to Performance and Conceptual Art (for those paying off MFA degrees, think Guy Debord), the man who would become Fra.Biancoshock developed the performative avant-garde school of art he calls Effimerismo (“The Effimerismo is a movement that has the aim of producing works of art that exists in a limited way in the space, but that they persist in an infinite way in time…”) as a means of exploring and categorizing his specific means of street engagement (or as he is known to call them, “speeches”).

Operating in this very-intentionally public mode of communication, Fra.Biancoshock uses the streets as a forum, installing temporary interventions to call attention to themes of poverty, urban blight, modern stress and decay. Present in most works is how Fra deals with serious themes with a disarmingly light-hearted approach. His work has mostly been viewed (often quite temporarily) in Europe, though as Fra. says in his Manifesto-like statement, “Prior to founding the movement, [Fra.biancoshock] has made ​​more than 400 speeches on the streets of Italy , Spain , Portugal, Croatia, Hungary, Czech Republic, Malaysia and the State of Singapore, and has no intention of stopping.” (via hi-fructose)

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Giovanni Bucci

 

This showreel is made of a selection of projects done by freelance designer Giovanni Bucci over the last few years. The audio track is a blended/synthesis of flavours from the latest productions of Marco Morano, which include dirty electro, over compressed grooves, classical atmospheres and re-built sound effects.

 

After experimenting and researching how audio can influence and inspire video and viceversa, they have worked out a personal formula. Instead of working audio and video separately, as it is common practice in the media industry, every draft of the video editing was followed by an audio adjustment  in a way that both authors could get influenced by the work of the other, until they felt that an harmonious final edit was achieved.

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Jason Maloney

halfof1Half of Everything is Fair…

 

Jason Maloney’s work is clever and oh so true. His paintings and drawings obviously stem from events in his past, but when transformed into these amazing pieces everyone can relate to them. Maloney is known as a “Pop Surrealist” who received formal training in painting and drawing at Cal State Fullerton.  His work can easily be identified by his consistent use of cut outs, wide range of bright colors, and attention to detail.  Skateboard graphics from the 1980’s, horror films, and heavy metal music inspired Maloney throughout his life and is probably the reason why he has recently been doing graphic work for clothing and skateboard products. I find a lot of his paintings and drawings very personally inspiring. I can’t help but look at all the details in each piece and all I want to do after looking at his work is CREATE.

 

Jason Maloney has also painted some public murals and currently draws and paints in Newport Beach, CA.

 

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Gorgeously Creepy Chapel Made Of Thousands Of Human Bones

human bones church

human bones church

human bones church

human bones church

Though it might look like any other Polish chapel from the outside, the Kaplica Czaszek chapel sets itself apart: behind a humble pair of wooden doors, it contains the bones of thousands. After visiting shallow grave sites commemorating the fallen soldiers and civilians killed in the Silesian Wars, the Thirty Years’ War, plagues, and cholera, a local priest named Vaclav Tomasek collected and cleaned skeletal remains, embedding them in the chapel walls.

Constructed between 1776 and 1804, the building’s architecture stunningly deconstructs the human skeleton; skulls and leg bones are meticulously arranged over the ceilings and walls, while other bones are hidden behind a trapdoor and kept in a crypt. The repetitive patterns that emerge from a single human bone laid out a thousand times over serves to remind us of our connectedness; while each individual femur or cranium stands in for a deceased individual, it takes on a deeper, more universal meaning as part of this expertly-constructed whole.

Within this celebration of oneness, Tomasek set apart strange and unusual bones, placing them on the church altar. Alongside the skull of a mayor and the chapel founder, sits a skull morphed by syphilis, one of a rumored giant, and a few penetrated by bullets. In this way, the structure daringly elevates the macabre—and those who suffered from uncommon maladies—to the spiritual level of relics left behind by local religious and political leaders.

Within the context of the church and its representations of the Virgin Mary and Jesus Christ, the remains offer a potent juxtaposition between the spiritual and the corporeal. Visitors cannot escape this powerful reminder of mortality, but if they so wish, they are poignantly invited to consider the possibility of salvation and eternal life. (via Lost at E Minor and Smithsonian Magazine)

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Celebrate New Year’s with…Gin & Tonic Mist?

Why drink Gin & Tonics the old fashioned way through liquid, when you can suit up in a plastic hazmat rain coat and inhale your alcohol through the air? Food architects Bompas & Parr turn boozin’ into a brand new experience.

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Collages By Ryan Swanson

ryan swanson even condos can crumbleRyan Swanson digitally manipulates images to create neon-techno-funky-retro-futuristic collages.  If you enjoy juxtaposition, take a look at his work.

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Evan Campbell’s Scary Faces

Free-lance sculptor extraordinaire Evan Campbell creates insanely realistic sculptures!  His work has been featured in films by Martin Scorsese, John Carpenter, Wes Craven, Robert Rodriguez, Quentin Tarantino, Michael Mann, and Kevin Smith.

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Benjamin Phillips

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Batman is pretty cool, but he does naughty stuff all the time.

Benjamin Phillip’s is an illustrator/poet/music man working out of Brighton, England. His work is a mixed bag of wizadry, sad children, wicked cool parties, and leaves.  His illustrations all have an underlined witty sense of humor that seems very unique and bizarre.

 

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