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Dmitry Morozov Has Created A Music Machine That Plays Off Of Tattoos

Dmitry Morozov- Installation

Dmitry Morozov- InstallationDmitry Morozov- Installation

Russian artist Dmitry Morozov has found a way to make sound from tattoo ink. Working to unite robotics with his passion for art and sound, he created a machine that makes music based on the reading of a tattoo on ones’ body. This is Morozov’s way of bringing objects and ideas he cares about closer to one another, as opposed to the distance that the natural world places between such distant and distinct genres.

“In essence, Morozov, also known as ::vtol::, has created a tattoo capable of producing music when scanned with a special instrument. He has one on his own body — an eight-inch long design that appears like a mysterious barcode on his forearm, featured in the video above. With the slide of an eerie, cyborg-like machine, the design produces avant-garde noise appealing to the most highbrow of listeners.

So how does it work? According to The Creator’s Project, the scanning instrument consists of “arduino nano, a metal railing, hand controllers, and a black line sensor (on the tattoo).” A motor guides the mechanism along the inked design, with the lengths of each bar equaling the duration of various sounds. The addition of a Nintendo Wii controller equipped with Open Sound Control enhances the sound possibilities; if he moves his appendage, an accelerometer transforms the movement into distortion.” (Excerpt from Source)

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Noah Sheldon’s Unknown Landscapes

Noah Sheldon’s well rounded portfolio has a little bit of everything for everyone. My favorite photos are his landscape shots. Although they are images of familiar places, the composition and perspectives make them feel like worlds from a far away galaxy. Noah also has a hilarious series of cat photos wearing human clothes for those of you who need a good laugh during the work week. All of this and more after the jump!

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Roomba Robot Vacuum Art

Art can be made with anything. You can use a stick, the back of a napkin or a Roomba vacuum can be used to create new imagery. This series of photos were made by artists from all over the world who attached various lights on top of the saucer shaped vacuums, set up a camera at a long exposure and let the good times roll. The result is a series of light drawings that are straight out of your favorite laser tag session or Tron. There’s even a Flickr image pool where you can upload your own Roomba art and join the new vacuum art movement!

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Facundo Arganaraz’s Reinvigorated Images

Facundo Arganaraz lives and work in San Francisco. Using entirely found imagery and a crisp design sensibility Arganaraz alters and skews in order to create a modern dialogue with vintage visuals. His subject matter and acrylic with screen print technique is reminiscent of Christopher Wool and Andy Warhol as he too utilizes a design based aesthetic in which he incorporates text, multiples of the same imagery, and washed out color fields. In his own words: “Living among the vestiges of cultural entropy, I am using anachronistic elements and discarded images not for their nostalgic value but as remains (debris, waste, etc.) of 20th century utopias on the making. Mostly comprised of found photographs, photocopies, and pages from vintage books depicting modern designs and/or environments, I recruit this imagery (retro esthetics) as a mark-making tool, already packed and charged (ready-made?) with pictorial formal elements. Their core forms serve only to organize visual fields into dynamic, constructed compositions that hold a structural relation to the surface they organize.”

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Tsherin Sherpa’s Contemporary Twist On Tibetan Thangka Paintings

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Tsherin Sherpa, born in Kathmandu Nepal, originally trained as a traditional Tibetan thangka painter with his father Master Urgen Dorje. From the age of twelve, he underwent six years of intensive training before travelling to Taiwan to study Mandarin and computer science. Since then he has returned to thangka painting but has added a contemporary twist to the traditional paintings leaving behind the traditional confines of the age old practice. His work now mixes the techniques and imagery of thangka with contemporary subject matter.

When asked about breaking from tradition Sherpa states:

“Sometimes if one gets too obsessed with the rules, there’s a danger of getting entangled in that very obsession.  We then become more concerned about not breaking the rule. Because of that, from the traditional art’s point of view, the contemporary work with Buddhist imagery may even get categorized as sacriligious. I am working with some of the images that are viewed as the ultimate portrayal of certain deity. And to manipulate it, is obviously taboo.

However, if we scratch the layer a little deeper, and analyze these Buddhist images, one will find that they are a means to develop a practitioner’s (Buddhist) goal towards enlightenment, which means that the images are not the ultimate goal but rather a vehicle. A representation of a Buddha in 2- or 3-dimensional form is not the actual Buddha. It is a mere representation. And to fall into the trap of perceiving them to be the ultimate, is actually getting oneself entangled with the rules.”

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Max J. Marshall

I’m loving the simplicity and directness in Max J. Marshall’s photographs.

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Bijan Berahimi

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Bijan Berahimi is a Los Angeles local designer, illustrator, publisher, and more. He has recently updated his website with fresh works from posters, to postcards; web sites to exhibits. His work is light-hearted and welcoming, full of color and suprises. Bijan also publishes an e-zine titled FISKa growing resource for designers – a platform for discussion & participation.

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Disturb Me…


 

“Disturb Me” is an interactive installation by The Popcorn Makers  between human and his environment. It is to make perceptible the reciprocal links and often forgotten contact, that we maintain with our environment.

The projection depends on the sound emitted by the spectators and creates consequently, a transitory and colored environment. The projected forms are revealed when in contact with surfaces of the room.


The senses are awakened, the room becomes alive.

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