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Graffiti Artists Paint A 15,000 Square Foot Mural On The Walls Of A Swiss Prison

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Sixteen graffiti artists painted over 4500 square meters of a Swiss prison throughout an eighteen month period. Their work spanned exercise yards, corridors, stairwells, and the extensive outside wall, which alone would use around 1000 spray paint cans. The project began as a sort of celebration of graffiti as a unique art style as well as a desire to bring the artists’ work into a new environment with a challenge of large walls. Besides pushing personal boundaries of creating work on such a grand scale, the artists wanted to change the atmosphere of the prison. Their project would turn a cold, banal, uncomfortable setting into a warmer space for both prisoners and staff. The duration of creating the paintings was equally matched by the amount of planning and concept creating needed to span such a large space and find harmony between sixteen different artistic styles. The physicality and planning, however, were not the only difficult tasks: the artists were met with an emotional challenge as well. Despite knowing they we not confined, they were still consistently aware of their setting and were given a mere glimpse of what it is like on the inside. For example, they needed to call guards to be let out of the space and were daily witnesses to the day to day tension that exist within a prison.

Artists include Malik, Claude “Note” Lüthi, Robert Proch, Onur, Mizzo, Ti, Lain, Ata “Toast” Bosaci, Huran “Shark” Dogan, Daniel Zeltner, Sarah Parsons, Nevercrew (Pablo Togni and Cristian Rebecchi), Benjamin Solt, David Monllar, and Chromeo

A book, titled 4661m2: Art in Prison, has been published about the project to allow the public access to the locked up work. The book also hopes to inspire similar projects.

For more information, check out the projects website here.

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Stratis Tavlaridis Constructs Ethereal, Geometric Clothing Out Of Cut Paper

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Stratis Tavlaridis is a Greek artist who constructs perforated objects out of paper. His works are inspired by everyday life, and with his eye for geometric patterns and flowing designs, he transforms ordinary items into ethereal manifestations of themselves. Featured here is a selection of his fashion pieces—shirts and vests that have been immaculately hewn with overlapping shapes and twisting, snake-like outlines. The use of negative space in each object gives it a silky, luminescent quality as light filters through the gaps.

Tavlaridis’ other works include other “textile” objects, such as carpets, tablecloths, and drapery. Often these pieces are included in larger installations, such as Perforated: Weavings of Cohabitation, a homage to his ancestry and culture. Another remarkable piece is his recreation of King Phillip II’s funerary monument—a gauzy, layered entranceway intended to evoke the experience of entering a hallowed space. Whatever he creates using his masterful technique, each of Tavlaridis’ papercut objects is imbued with an awe-striking presence and divine beauty.

Visit his Cargo Collective page to learn more.

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Hargreaves + Levin Explore The Beauty Of Symmetry With Their Mesmerizing Photos Of Patterns Made With Fruits And Vegetables

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Shapes that appear familiar displayed in a symmetrical manner and playing with our imagination. Photographer Henry Hargreaves and food stylist Caitlin Levin have come together once again under Hargreaves + Levin to collaborate on a food project. This time using only fruits and vegetables and grouping them by monthly harvest.

January: endive, radicchio, kale, turnips, leeks
February: papaya, radish, onions, clementine, oregano, passion fruit, chive flowers
March: asparagus, artichoke, broccolini, greens, string beans
April: spring onions, purple potatoes, fingerling potatoes, carrots , herbs
May: carrots, limes, peas, garlic shoots, zucchini
June: fava, chives, apricots, cherries, plums, sugar snaps, peaches, blueberries, strawberries, radish
July:, figs, plums, oregano, ochre , greens, raspberries, onions
Aug:, tomatoes, basil
Sept: corn, garlic, beans, Mexican sour gherkins, ground cherries , sunchoke, dill
October: mushrooms, greens
November: purple cabbage, bok choy, shallots, cauliflower , tangelo, pomegranate seeds, sunchoke
December: pears, potatoes, sage, rosemary, brussel sprouts, persimmons, shallots, nutmeg, mandarins, cranberries

From far, the whole picture looks like a perfectly arranged combination of shapes and harmonized color tones. Some of the shapes seem familiar until we come closer and discern the fruit and veggies one by one. We’re then able to see every curve, nook and cranny in detail. The mirrored images help create a symmetry. This process allows the fruits and veggies to become a design, a pattern within the picture.

The rendering is both astonishing and intriguing. On each small surface of the photograph, with the help of imagination we can envision creatures, insects and creative characters. Acting just like the Rorschach test, the combination of fruits and veggies trigger the mind to explore the picture and come up with a unique vision. The purpose of the project designed by Hargreaves and Levin is to ‘explore symmetry, natural beauty, and the way imperfections and inconsistencies often become the most breathtaking examples of nature’s artistry’.

The photographs above and below this text have been displayed to match the monthly order of the year.

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A Virtual Reality Mask That Allows You To See Through The Eyes Of Animals

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Marshmallow Laser Feast is an interdisciplinary arts studio that uses tech to create interactive and magical experiences. From laser-bearing drones to movement-reactive instruments, their works fuse together lighting, sound, and visuals in a synesthesia-like exploration of enlightening and alternative realities. Their newest project, In the Eyes of An Animal, revisualizes the world we think we know as it is perceived by different creatures. When wearing Marshmallow Laser Feast’s strange, pod-like virtual reality mask, participants are immersed in 360° renderings of Grizedale Forest, exploring the treetops and undergrowth as a dragonfly, frog, or an owl. The world was created using a synthesis of multiple techniques, including CT scanning, photogrammetry, and an aerial camera.

The video above provides a teaser of what the experience looks like. In a tour of parallel worlds, the mask guides you through the forest while accentuating and transforming the senses: molecule-like particles break apart and shift; trees, plants, and animals become flickers of abstract color; and bird song, insect calls, and music melt together in an otherworldly melody that slows down time and flows in rhythm with the undulating forest. The effect is haunting yet spellbinding, reinvograting a child-like curiosity about the deep dark woods and the beings that inhabit it. Marshmallow Laser Feast’s artistic interpretation of different perceptions reminds us that reality is not singular or concrete, and that we live in a world of multiple worlds. In the Eyes of An Animal demonstrates the freedom, empathy, and beauty in exploring realities that exist alongside our own.

Visit Marshmallow Laser Feast’s Facebook, Instagram, and Vimeo to learn more. A short bio can be viewed here. (Via Time Wheel)

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Daisuke Tajima’s Images Of The Ultra-Detailed Cities That Live Within His Mind


Daisuke Tajima’s paintings are vertiginous in all aspects. They depict ultra-detailed never-ending tall buildings. The artist is placing the perspective from above, as if we were flying amongst the city. But the beauty of these paintings lies in the fact that they are all imaginary.

To get lost into his art. This seems to be the aim of the young artist. The paintings are massive and the features of the city landscapes so small. The rooftops are particularly intricately detailed. From the pipes and machineries to the hoists. The repetition of these elements form a pattern which appears regularly throughout the painting and which makes the whole picture look claustrophobic. Daisuke Tajima says he feels comfortable in this world. He seems to dominate what is around him. An escape which he purposely created in order to be able to feel safe and in control.

“I wanted to hide away in my own world to ease the loneliness and insecurity I felt from not belonging. This piece is a world I can believe in.”

Daisuke Tajima just recently graduated in Japan. His talent was rewarded by a prize of 10 million yen (about $83K) for the cityscape series “gokinchotaikoku II”. Although this sounds like a rich outcome, it doesn’t look like success will stop the prodigy from creating sensitive and meaningful art pieces. Loosing himself into the depth of an imaginary city is Daisuke Tajima’s symbolic hideaway. (via Juxtapoz)

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Anne Lemanski Creates Quirky Sculptures Of Postmodern Animals

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American artist Anne Lemanski creates quirky, conceptual sculptures of animals. She begins by creating a copper rod amateur which she then cuts, manipulates, and braises together to create what she refers to as a three dimensional line drawing. She then uses various materials, such as prints created from images of her own collages, leather, and vinyl. These works act as a further adaptation of her collage practice. Her sculpture aesthetic roots from images she has been familiar with for years. As the Alumna Artist-In-Residence at the McColl Center for Arts + Innocation in Charlotte, North Carolina, Anne Lemanski developed her practice between both her collage and sculptural elements, leading her to create her newest exhibition, Simulacra. As the artist moved between techniques of meditative cutting and pasting to the physicality of creating a structure, she began to realize that ultimately, despite the difference in the materiality of the work, what was creating was the simulation of animals. By creating a falsified “double” of something that is in fact real. Lemanski allows herself to enter the postmodern discourse of the notion of “simulacra,” a concept associated with French philosopher Jean Baudrillard. Within the philosopher’s work Simulacra and Simulation (1981), Baudrillard argues that by creating “copies,” society has replaced all meaning with mere symbols. Thus, the human experience has become hyper-real, as all meaning is just a simulation of what once was. Lemanski notes that her own practice replicates the same notion, as she creates the simulacrum of nature. She allows two dimensional imaging to become three dimensional. This process allows the viewer to then experience the simulated, while channeling the real.

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Stefan Herda Uses Naturally-Sourced Paints To Capture The Mystery And Nostalgia Of Abandoned Houses

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Stefan Herda is a Toronto-based artist whose work and methodology explore our relationship with nature. He utilizes alternative techniques and natural materials in the creation of his art, deriving inks and dyes from wild blueberries, tea, turmeric, iron oxide, and more. From time-lapse videos of organic dyes interacting with household chemicals, to nebulae paintings infused with homemade ink and rainwater, his earth-toned and softly flowing works demonstrate an investigative and environmentally aware approach.

Featured here is Clapshacks, a series wherein Herda used natural colors and traditional textile dyeing techniques to paint portraits of derelict houses. Enclosed within hazy vignettes, buildings lean and collapse into the surrounding wilderness. There is a sense of peace and isolation; the buildings become crumbling, moss-strewn edifices that signify the resurging power of nature. There is a sense of retrospection, as well, that allows the viewer to consider the cycles of life, death, and renewal and the trajectory of human history. As Herda states in the project’s description, the Clapshack works “serve as a […] reference to old Romantic conventions, nostalgia for simpler times and the mystery inherent to the modern day ruin” (Source).

Visit Herda’s website to learn more. 

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Steve Schapiro Vibrant Photographs Document Neo Hippies At Music Festivals

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New York City native photographer Steve Schapiro documents what it means to be a hippie in 2015. Originally known for his photographs of and participation in the original Haight-Ashbury scene in San Francisco in the 1960s, Schapiro’s new aim is to explore where today’s hippie energy lays. From 2012 to 2014, Steve Schapiro, teaming with his son Theophilus Donoghue, traveled throughout the country following various “free-spirit movement” festivals such as Burning man in Nevada, Shasta festival and Rainbow Gathering in California, and others of the likes. Here what they found is that the “neo-hippie” generation “has more to do with meditation, yoga, fellowship, good vibes, and a search for the divine than it does with the mind-altering substances of its 60s predecessor.” Through images of mass nude meditation, men covered in mud in what looks like states of pure euphoria, group circles of shirtless people forming hand hearts with their neighbors, Schapiro sheds light into a community deeply rooted in finding their happiness through channels of love and nature.

This body of work can be found in his new book Bliss: Transformational Festivals & the Neo Hippie, published by powerHouse Books. The book’s press release states:

“In Bliss, Schapiro captures the multitudes who come to commune with nature, other like-minded souls, and all that is divine and inspirational in the multi-hued spectrum of human spirituality. He focuses on a subculture of the current hippie counterculture known as “Bliss Ninnies” — individuals who embrace meditation and dancing as a way to reach ecstatic states of joy. The book provides an overview of a new contemporary hippie life within America introduced to Schapiro by his son who began his own journey into Bliss at age 23.”

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