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Ryan De La Hoz’s Analog Patterns & Collages

Paper Cuts from Bradley Tangonan on Vimeo.

Long time pal and semi-recent B/D blog contributor Ryan De La Hoz not only likes to support fellow artists by blogging about them but also makes lots of wonderful work as well. In gearing up for his solo show at RVCA | VASF Gallery in SF Ryan took a few sneak peak photos for us of the new work. The show opens  Friday March 15th from 7 – 10pm and will feature an assortment of paintings, drawings, collage, and sculpture. Check out the video above for more insight into Ryan’s world and to learn about his analog art world.

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Cynthia Consentino’s Surreal Ceramics Mix And Match Heads, Torsos And Legs

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You won’t find cadavers or skeletal remains in ceramic artist Cynthia Consentino’s “Exquisite Corpse Series.” The project takes its name from the Parisian Surrealist parlor game, in which each player wrote a word or drew an image on a sheet of paper, folded the paper to conceal it, and passed it to the next player for his or her contribution. The results were wildly incongruous poems and images, gathered ideas from many minds.

In Consentino’s series, hers is the only mind at work, and the results are strangely charming and more than a little disturbing. The hybrid figures combine animal with human and the occasion household object. They play with the idea of gender stereotypes, something that began to interest the artist after reading a study where five-year-olds were asked to name a representational animal.

“The boys identified with animals that were predatory, and the girls with animals that were cute and cuddly. One girl even answered with a flower. I thought that there would also be girls who wanted to be tigers, but then I remembered loving playing a flower in a school play at that age. (Source)”

To loosen these gender constructs, she made varied heads, torsos, and legs then assembled them in ceramic sculptures of various configurations, some almost life-size. With their softly rounded limbs and pastel and pretty color palette they can seem almost sweet, but the fierce wolves heads and deadly weapons belie their innocence.

“My style seems a bit nostalgic, something from the fifties, or from folk art. It derives much of its character from children’s things: fairy tale, cartoons, dolls, games, as well as the domestic world. The work often incorporates imagery that is loaded with symbolism and history, such as flowers, animals and the ceramic figurine. It is very much about the familiar, things of our dreams, our stories, our childhood. (Source)”

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B/D X Sticker Robot Contest: And The Winner Is…

Last week we had a contest where you were asked to write a clever sentence using our sponsors name “Sticker Robot.” We got a lot of fun entries but after going through all of them we picked this lucky winner:  Hey Sticker Robot, I’m a stickler for stickers and know how to pick um, and unlike stamps there’s no need to lick um. Bam!

Congrats to Felisha Gonzales who will be getting a massive grab bag with copies of Beautiful/Decay Book 2Book 3, and Book 4, 3 Beautiful/Decay t-shirts, and a limited edition Fudge Factory Comics sticker pack by Travis Millard!

Stay tuned for future contests by signing up for our email list!

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Julia Holter’s Music Video “This is a True Heart”

Photo by Rick Bahto

Photo by Rick Bahto

Julia Holter

Julia Holter performing at the First Unitarian Church in Los Angeles on September 11, 2013. Photo by Barry Belkin

Los Angeles based artist Julia Holter recently released her third full length album, Loud City Song on Domino Records to great reviews as well as a feature about her in The New Yorker. I was lucky enough to catch the first show of her North American tour last week at the First Unitarian Church in Los Angeles as part of their Church Sessions concert series. Playing to a very respectful and quiet audience, she performed songs from her new album accompanied by members of Los Angeles’ wIld Up orchestra who also performed earlier in the evening. You could hear a pin drop during her entire performance making me happy the show wasn’t at your average club/venue.

Her cinematic new video, “This is a True Heart” is a perfect introduction to her beautiful voice and rather unique sound. Julia Holter is definitely worth your time and her live performance will resonate with you long after the lights come on. Upcoming shows include Chicago’s Schubas on September 21st as well Brooklyn’s Music Hall of Williamsburg on September 24th. You can also catch her in Europe this coming October and November. Check out the video and hopefully you can catch one of her upcoming performances.

 

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Christopher Jonassen’s Planet-Like Pots

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Photographer Chistopher Jonassen‘s series Devour seems cosmic in origin.  They appear to be photographs of planets mottled by millions of years of meteorite impacts and scarred by geological forces.  In reality the series depicts the bottoms of pots.  The worn metal is burnt, scratched, and often just old.  Devour illustrates the destruction, even violence, inherent in eating and nourishment.  On his website Jonassen precedes the series with a quote from philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre: “To eat is to appropriate by destruction.”

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Alejandra Villasmil’s Eyes Wide Shut

Self-taught artist from Santiago, Chile, Alejandra Villasmil creates visually stimulating collages. Her work questions the notions of desire, beauty, sexuality, as well as gender binaries.

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Kotama Bouabane’s Words Will Melt You

Kotama Bouabane’s melting word series says everything you’re thinking in you’re head but are afraid to say out loud with the help of some water and a bit of cold air.

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Jo Seub

Dad, I Want to Live until I marry seub!, 2000

Dad, I Want to Live until I marry seub!, 2000


Sort of in the same vein as cultural greats like Cindy Sherman, Korean artist Jo Seub explores self portraiture. But he often gives the effect that Ren & Stimpy had on me as a child who had yet to find humor in the grotesqueness of human (animated mangy animals) condition. An article by art critic Moon Young-Min on the artist’s website explains the “reason for his aesthetics of the frivolous, for his use of comedy as an art form; today’s younger generation understands comedy. Jo demonstrates clearly that one can communicate seriously while at the same time being funny…Jo Seub is not only skeptical about the ideology and religion that he is satirizing but he is also rebelling against the excessive weight and seriousness of the doctrinarian teaching and its rigid methodology. In fact, anti-Communism under the military dictatorship in South Korea, which took place in the context of South-North confrontation, is not much different from the anti-imperialism inculcated in North Korea.”

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