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Attack Of The Giant Moths…Created From Textiles And Embroidery!

Yumi Okita - fabric, cotton, fake fur, fabric paint, embroidery thread, wire, and feathers

Yumi Okita - fabric, cotton, fake fur, fabric paint, embroidery thread, wire, and feathers

Yumi Okita - fabric, cotton, fake fur, fabric paint, embroidery thread, wire, and feathers

Yumi Okita - fabric, cotton, fake fur, fabric paint, embroidery thread, wire, and feathers

Yumi Okita uses her amazing artistic skills to create colorful and large sculptures of moths and butterflies, along with other insects. This North Carolina based artist uses various techniques in textiles and embroidery to form her soft and colorful creatures. Each insect is made up of an extremely eclectic group of materials including fabric, embroidery, feathers, fabric paint, cotton, fake fur, and wire. The amount of materials, time, and skill needed to create each piece is apparent as you examine each soft and stunning creation. Not only are Okita’s moths and butterflies brightly colored to perfection, but are also much larger than life! Including wingspan, many of them measure up to nearly twelve inches.

The color of the thread used in the embroidery involved in Okita’s process may or may not be true to nature, containing bright magentas, brilliant blues, and deep greens, but create extremely eye-catching pieces none-the-less. Entomology, the study of insects, has long been popular as many people collect and display butterfly and moth specimens. Okita uses this concept and takes it to a whole new level. Instead of being pinned in a display case under glass, her “specimens” of butterflies and moths are larger than life, inviting to be touched. These fun and remarkably crafted insects can be found on Yumi Okita’s etsy sight, where you can buy one of these gorgeous specimens for yourself! (via Booooom)

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Command+Z

 
Command + Z from Kris Wong on Vimeo.

What a perfect name for a design super-hero. The making of videos and fight-scene choreography are so entertaining, due to leopard pants wearing said hero. Tarantino and Rodriguez should take these dudes on for the next low-budget flick.

Found at cmdz.tv/

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Adrian Esparza Transforms Mexican Serape Blankets Into Intricate Geometric Thread Installations

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Adrian Esparza

Texas-based artist Adrian Esparza uses nails and the thread from Mexican sarape blankets to weave colorful geometric patterns. Growing up in El Paso, Esparza encountered these blankets on a daily basis. Using his background as a painter, Esparza observed that the blankets contained painterly qualities that he sought to deconstruct. The result is an unraveling of a Mexican cultural symbol into a new form, a multi-dimensional landscape of color and shape. Esparza’s deconstruction and transformation of this cultural symbol reflects the displacement of identity that many Mexican-Americans experience as a result of migration. The wall pieces Esparza constructs from the serapes, though completely transformed, recall macrame and other handcrafts from the artist’s culture. Through his work, Esparza reinvents the ordinary and asks the viewer to embrace the potential for creative transformation that can be found in the familiar and the mundane.

Esparza’s work – titled “Wake and Wonder” –  will be on view at Pérez Art Museum Miami as part of the exhibition, “Americana: Formalizing Craft,” until May 2015.(via design boom)

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Wayne Gilbert’s Human Remains Paintings

Wayne Gilbert doesn’t just paint your average minimal iconic paintings? His painting process involves mixed REAL human remains into his work. I’m not sure if he’s visiting the local funeral home to pick up a bag of dust or taking bones and pulverizing them to mix into paint but he definitely gets the “creepiest art material” award for 2011. Check out the rest of his work after the jump.

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Jake Wood-Evans’ Modern Take on Classical/Renaissance/Baroque Art

Brighton-based artist Jake Wood-Evans‘ classical influences are readily apparent. A 21st-century Caravaggio? Who knows. But dude’s definitely on the right track. Celebrating his heroes while producing work that’s relevant to his period, Woods-Evans executes drips and fades in disaffected, casual gestures. Laurel wreaths and nuclear explosions are likely to meet in a single composition. If you’re near Brighton next month, check out his work at the Brighton Media Centre the 7th through the 16th. More images of the artist’s work after the jump.

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Starkly Graceful Black And White Photos Of Icebergs

Jan Erik Waider photography9 icebergs

Jan Erik Waider icebergs

Jan Erik Waider photography8 icebergs

The photographs of Jan Erik Waider seem to turn natural formations into abstract sculptures.  His series Ice on Black captures icebergs in stark black and white photography.  The textures, movement, and shape of the floating ice is surprisingly sculptural.  The graceful masses of ice juxtaposed against the larger field of open sea nearly seem like a painterly decision.  Waider is a graphic designer by trade, but his passion if for photography and the northern landscape.  He specifically captures the majority of his photographs in and near Greenland and Iceland.

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Sergey Sbss

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Sergey Sbss is a Moscow based graphic artist and designer. Sergey applies his style through collaborations with numerous industries, and is intent on furthering such collaborations in order to experiment with varied and unexpected surfaces.

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Thousands of Suspended Balls Create Bitmap Color Grid

I’m absolutely loving Nike Savvas’ brilliant installation Atomic: Full Of Love, Full Of Love which is created with thousands of suspended
bouncy balls organized in a hyperspectrum of colors. Created in 2005 this piece is a rainbow-brite labryinth of color that I’d love to get lost in for hours and hours. (via colosal & jobs wife)

 

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