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MADEWITHHATE / JAMES DIN A4

dennis buschDennis Busch records songs under silly monikers such as James Din A4, Pop Dylan, and Krieghelm Hundewasser. In 2006 he set up MadeWithHate as a graphics and fashion outlet to complete his artist cycle. The projects form MadewithHate are fresh from Ottersberg, Germany, so check them out cause it was a long flight email to L.A.

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Cut Paper, Part 2

Georgia Russel, L'Amour Fou (Andre Breton), 2009

Georgia Russell, L'Amour Fou (Andre Breton), 2009

A little while ago, I introduced you to a few artists who use cut paper as material for their artwork. Read on to learn more about today’s cut paper artists!

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The Radical Portraiture Of I Must Be Dead Challenges Conventional Representations Of Identity

I Must Be Dead - Photography

I Must Be Dead - Photography

I Must Be Dead - Photography

I Must Be Dead - Photography
I Must Be Dead (Mckay Jaffe) is a Pheonix-based photographer who challenges conventional representations of identity through experimental portraiture. Rich with narrative and exploding with color, his works are consistently enrapturing and unsettling, in that they collide sensuality with horror, beauty with death. The faces of his bizarre models are intensely expressive, and usually obscured in some way, such as with paint, masks, and/or deep shadows. Breaching the line between fantasy and reality, his works are evocative yet alien, begging the question: “is this real?” Some of Jaffe’s work comes from the Burning Man festival, where he captures subjects befitting to his oeuvre: people actively inhabiting alternative identities and lifestyles.

On the I Must Be Dead Facebook page, Jaffe’s tongue-in-check biography reveals his counter-cultural approach to art and societal expectations. He claims that he has excelled in “unprofessional photography since 1845” and has won “5 Nobel peace prizes,” poking fun at conventional understandings of “success” and thereby marking his work as subversive. “Being human is a program,” Jaffe wrote to me, when I inquired about the social commentary present in his work. “You are designed to act and feel relative to the life you are given.”

For him, the “way out” of repressive structures is to test the possibilities of identity. Life is an evolving, experimental process; as Jaffe writes, “[You must] learn to learn, learn to grow, learn to accept, learn to see things from the other side, learn to laugh, learn to love, learn to live your life.” His photographic ventures into the realms of beauty, intensity, and absurdity are very much part of a learning process — one in which the limits of selfhood are explored in the development of an open self-understanding. (Via Beautiful.Bizarre)

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Ted Parker’s Sunny Disposition

In Ted Parker’s positive world of blank smiles and happiness naked women are dragged around by their husbands, dogs smoke, couple drink tea naked, lions play basketball, and police officers touch each others genitals all with a giant smile on their faces.

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EPOS 257’s Giant Paint Cannon takes out Billboards

Street artist EPOS 257 built himself a giant paint cannon and decided to liberate some billboards. This thing looks like it could cause a lot of damage and be a lot of fun. EPOS 257 says about this project “this is not an attack on a particular advert but billboard as a medium in general, which in this context represents a painter`s canvas in the urban landscape.” More paint cannon fun after the jump! (via)

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Mark Tuschman’s Powerful Photographs Documents The Lives Of Women Living In High-Risk Situations

Girls with computer#492E7D4 Maasai girls read p#492E82C Mother and daughter#492E883 Mother before birth#492E8C9

Photographer Mark Tuschman’s book, Faces of Courage: Intimate Portraits of Women on the Edge, documents women living in high-risk living situations. He photographs moments that encourage an aura of strength, capturing the true resilience women have. Many of these women face potential life threatening situations on a daily basis, such as arranged child marriages, forced pregnancies, domestic violence, human trafficking, and the denial of education. These are situations that often lead to serious mental and physical health issues — most of which are treatable given access to the correct facilities. Tuschman has been able to work in collaboration with NGOs, foundations, and UN agencies with the hopes to help both educate and empower women. His work documents efforts of grassroots organizations providing basic medical care, recovery surgery from injuries caused by young pregnancies, HIV/AIDS treatment, and shelter ensuring safety. These organizations also offer mentoring and educational programs that help women to learn various skills such as family planning, sexual education, as well as skills to help become business owners and gain financial independence.

His photographs capture moments from three continents, spanning between seventeen countries including; India, Bangladesh, Vietnam, Laos, Indonesia, Ghana, Nigeria, Ethiopia, Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania, Malawi, Nicaragua, Guatemala, Peru, Ecuador and Trinidad. Mark Tuschman has been an international photographer for over 35 years and has actively been an advocate of global health and human rights for women. His work has received various awards and has been featured during multiple international health conferences. He is hoping to raise additional funds through book sales in order to donate copies to high school libraries with the aim to “inspire a new generation of activists, and to motivate those already working toward equality, to continue empowering women and girls.”

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Sergey Sbss

stereo-89.white_inner_pack.poster_by_Sbss

Sergey Sbss is a Moscow based graphic artist and designer. Sergey applies his style through collaborations with numerous industries, and is intent on furthering such collaborations in order to experiment with varied and unexpected surfaces.

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Diane Arbus: Photographing Freaks Or The Costumes We Wear Year-Round

Diane Arbus - Photography

Diane Arbus - Photography Diane Arbus - Photography

Diane Arbus - Photography

As we wave goodbye to Halloween, let’s take a minute to mediate on the innately striking work of Diane Arbus and her unbiased approach to documenting not just the spookier side of humanity, but even more so, the masks or costumes we present to the world as a species, as human beings, as ourselves . . . year-round.

Now, when I use the word “unbiased” here I am not suggesting Arbus’s eye is roaming and invisible. Quite the contrary. Her eye is always distinctly there: focused, from one frame to the next. This “unbiased” quality has more to do with her indiscriminate examination of each subject in the same oddly intimate and unflinching way– regardless of class, age, gender, sexual preference, or race. In other words, a child with a toy hand grenade in the park looks equally as strange as the a woman lounging next to a toy poodle or a handful of residents dressed up on Halloween at a home for the mentally retarded. No one person, group, or act is more privileged. No one is all the more beautiful. We are all playing dress-up as far as identity and image is concerned.

By seeking out each individual’s innate desire to present him or herself and critically or creatively twisting that into her own perception of costume in each person’s presentation, Arbus became not just a photographer, but an alchemist, shifting our ideas of self, reality, and personal intention. Whether you are a part of celebrity culture or a more marginalized society spread out along the fringe, Arbus’s certain way of looking did not glorify one way of living over the other.

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