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Starkly Graceful Black And White Photos Of Icebergs

Jan Erik Waider photography9 icebergs

Jan Erik Waider icebergs

Jan Erik Waider photography8 icebergs

The photographs of Jan Erik Waider seem to turn natural formations into abstract sculptures.  His series Ice on Black captures icebergs in stark black and white photography.  The textures, movement, and shape of the floating ice is surprisingly sculptural.  The graceful masses of ice juxtaposed against the larger field of open sea nearly seem like a painterly decision.  Waider is a graphic designer by trade, but his passion if for photography and the northern landscape.  He specifically captures the majority of his photographs in and near Greenland and Iceland.

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Jonathan Monaghan Renders A Utopian Universe Modeled After A Faberge Egg

jonathan monaghan photographyjonathan monaghan photographyjonathan monaghan photographyjonathan monaghan photography

For over one hundred years the Faberge egg has been a symbol of wealth, status and beauty. Originally created by Carl Faberge for the Russian Tsars to gift their wives during easter time, its exquisite makeup consisted of the finest jewels, metals and motifs. Its structure depicted scenes of historical and domestic value which the Russian Royal family deemed significant. Over time, these precious objects d’art became unusual records of lavish beauty which consisted of coronation scenes and portraits of kings and queens.

Incorporating the same idea with a modern twist, artist Jonathan Monaghan creates Faberge eggs in a digital format which combine pop culture, human anatomy, luxury items and historical architecture. His vision produces an egg-shaped utopia which comments both conceptually and sociologically on world tradition. Through a kaleidoscopic view of the past, present and future, his narrative breaks down what we deem important and questions our desire for material wealth.  In one piece, the egg is replaced with Starbucks logos instead of jewels. It metaphors the brand we hold near and dear to us today and creates an egg-shaped universe that speaks to the viewer with a utopian ideal that places worth on things opposed to ideas and individuals.
Only fifty of the original Faberge ‘Imperial’ eggs were made and only forty-seven survive. The first Faberge heirloom, known as the Hen Egg was a replica of an actual white egg that disclosed a solid gold yolk inside. This in turn stored a golden hen which further possessed a tiny diamond replica of the Imperial Crown from which a ruby egg pendant hung. Unfortunately, these last two surprises were lost.
jonathan monaghan photography
jonathan monaghan photographyjonathan monaghan photographyjonathan monaghan photography

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Jeremy Tinder’s Block Party

For people who have a soft spot for early animation Jeremy Tinder’s new work pricks the skin like Cupid’s arrow.  The strangely solid little people remind me of rock crystals or the thread spools that R. Crumb would draw faces on, something small, secret and precious.  If they weren’t painted I would want to put one in my pocket to talk too when I felt down and out.  Ok, that was weird, but you see where I was going with that.

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Run Wrake

If you attended one of the previous annual Animation Shows, you may have seen Run Wrake’s short animation “Rabbit” (and me!) From the show, Run Wrake’s film was one of my favorites. He used elements from the classic Dick and Jane books to weave an equally classic tale of greed and it’s horrible consequences. I love how, just like in the Dick and Jane books, everything in every scene is accurately labeled.

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Andrea Hasler’s Sculptures Made Out Of Flesh And Guts

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Installation view Irreducible Complexity/ You and I and Irreducible Complexity/heart

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The sculptural work of Andrea Hasler has always created a dichotomous dynamic – push and pull, revulsion and attraction. The Zurich, Switzerland-born artist (previously featured here) has used her trademark visual medium of sculpted fiber-glass covered with wax to insinuate the human body, with equal parts inference to our insides as well as outsides. 

Her newest work is title Embrace the Base, a commission for Greenham Common in Berkshire, England by New Greenham Arts. The site, which held the longest women’s protest against a site storing nuclear weapons in the early 1980’s, is rich with history and emotion. The larger pieces in Hasler’s commission recall the tents that these women protesters erected in their camp outside of the military base which now serves as a cultural meeting place.

“For the New Greenham Arts Exhibition, I have created a new sculptural body of work that takes Greenham Common’s history as a starting point, particularly with the Women’s Peace Camp with its tents situated on the site during this time. This new work also takes into account the historical perspective. as well as entwines with the recreational aspect of how Greenham Common as a site, is being used now, as well as the New Greenham Art gallery being located in the former American Army’s entertainment quarter. Metaphorically I am taking the notion of the tents which were on site during the Women’s Peace Camp, as the container for emotions, and “humanise” these elements to create emotional surfaces.

Hasler mentions that with Embrace the Base she is taking a political element as a starting point and then involving body politics. In Matriarch and Next of Kin, two tent forms, cloaked in skin-like covering, recall the tents that these protesters erected in the Women’s Peace Camp. While one tent is a full-sized replica, the other scaled down, and as the artist hints, most likely represents a mother and child relationship. Often working with skin as a loaded (and typically, simultaneously literal) metaphor, Hasler says, “It’s almost like I am taking the fabric of the tent, the sort of the nylon element of the tent, and I make the fabric, this skin layer as sort of the container for emotion, or sort of the container to hold emotion, as in the skin holding emotion.”

Embrace the Base is on view now at the Corn Exchange Newbury & New Greenham Arts through April 11th, 2014.

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Lorenzo Vitturi’s Hand-Made visions of the world

Italian photogprapher Lorenzo Vitturi describes his work as “hand-made visions” where each body of work consists of a completely constructed new world where each visual element is hand crafted  with the utmost attention to detail. For his latest project Anthropocene Vitturi created a strange industrial world filled with debris, strange colored horses, and surreal body builders. Vitturi say’s about this project:

“This project is the result of a reflection about the relationship between man and nature, as it proposes – in line with 16th Century naturalistic painting – a symbolic system able to visualize the intersection between this two dimensions.
Up to the early 20th Century nature had been represented as an unspoiled, pure space animated by uncontrollable forces;
today, after just one Century, nature has proved to be a fragile system whose survival is highly dependent on an increasingly pervasive and destructive anthropization.
In such a context, where all equilibria and “rules of the game” are being overthrown, how can we still depict nature and men? Nature is loosing its natural features, while men are increasingly taking control over the whole cycle of life.
Starting from this paradox, my project consists in a series of images where site-specific installations built within a derelict location play a central role. In this visions the “mis en scene” becomes a tool for representing a nature which appears less authentic and indeed more and more a cultural product.
Each image is the result of a meticulous process of scene design and construction. The materials used were scattered construction and industrial remains, natural pigments and fake plants.”

See more images from Anthropocene and some very nice behind the scenes photos of the construction of the shoot after the jump!

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A Sound Art Installation Powered By Cigars

Ronald van der Meijs Ronald van der Meijs

Dutch artist Ronald van der Meijs’ “Play it one more time for me La Ville Fumée” is a sound-art installation that works on hand made cigars and refers to the history of Eindhoven city, when it was one of the largest cigar-producing cities of Europe. At that time the city was also called ‘La Ville Fumée’. The installation is in many ways about nature versus culture. The technique used here has an almost machine like character, that is controlled and monitored by a natural and traditional item: the hand made cigar. Because each cigar has its own strength by the natural and traditional way of making, they all have their own fire rate. It is precisely this fact that the installation is not working in a predictable way but rather relates to a more or less natural rhythm. The installation has 4 tuners each control a recorder by means of pistons containing the hand-rolled cigars. There are 4 different recorders: a bass flute, alto, tenor, and a soprano. The pistons with the cigars and the recorders are both controlled by 2 abstract lungs. This sound-art burning cigar installation can be seen as a tribute to the former tobacco industry of Eindhoven city and its thousands of workers and craftsmen. The sound composition is a requiem for the former cigar production industry of Eindhoven. (via)

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