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Waste Land

I’m dying to see Waste Land, a new documentary featuring photographer Vik Muniz. Shot over three years, Muniz goes to his native brazil to visit the worlds largest garbage dump to collaborate with the local trash pickers on a massive photo project. A few friends have seen this at film festivals and strongly recommended it. Who knows, maybe i’ll get lucky and get a press copy in the mail (hint, hint, hint). Keep tabs on the movies website for release dates. Looks like a good one.

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Salem’s King Night

Lets keep the Christmas cheer going with this video! Ho Ho Ohhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh Noooooooooooooo!

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Boyfriend By Best Coast

BOYFRIEND://best_coast from Theo Anthony on Vimeo.

This one goes out to all the ladies on the B/D blog. Happy Monday!

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Christina Mrozik’s Darkly Beautiful Illustrations Explore The Interconnections Between All Living Beings

Christina Mrozik - Illustration Christina Mrozik - Illustration Christina Mrozik - Illustration Christina Mrozik - Illustration

Living matter thrives and dies within the intricate linework of Michigan-born artist Christina Mrozik. On large pieces of paper, she uses pen, ink, marker, and watercolor to compose semi-surreal visions of nature that are much different from the usual paintings of serene landscapes and friendly animals. Mrozik’s creatures bustle with a quiet ferocity: cranes perching on wolf carcasses split open with their progeny inside; owls flap wildly, trying to escape a rope of viscera that binds them to the roots below. Full of verdant symbolism, it somewhat resembles a twisted Garden of Eden, but it is important not to let the dark imagery overwhelm us; Mrozik’s vision of life-embracing-death (and vice versa) transcends existential horror, arriving at a depiction of nature that gives meaning to death and joins all living things in a greater life process.

The human perception of “nature” is central to Mrozik’s work. In her artist’s statement, she points out the seemingly contradictory “double perception” we have of nature: “it is either something to be glorified, or something to be dominated” (Source). We relish in its beauty and the idea of “untouched” lands, but we also wish to place ourselves above it, to separate ourselves, defining it as an “other” that can be controlled and exploited. Through her organic forms and the fusion of human and animal imagery, Mrozik’s art seeks to dissolve these imaginary boundaries, exemplifying how a sentience exists throughout all living things. As she concludes: “I feel that the basic stories of feeding, migration, shelter, mating, and self awareness are an essential part of our inner being and affect our view of the world both around us and within us.” (Source).

Visit Mrozik’s website, Facebook page, and Instagram to view more of her emotionally gripping and beautiful work.

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Old Navy Causes A Stir With Insulting Anti-Artist T-Shirts

Old Navy, T-Shirts - Product Design Steve Ogden, T-Shirts - Product Design

Anyone who has ever pursued a liberal arts career has probably heard the opinion: that there’s no future in the arts, or at the very least, it’s going to be extremely difficult. While the latter is probably true (Rome wasn’t built in a day, and so on), the bias against the arts—often in favor of science and the trades—is highly prevalent in our public discourse.

Old Navy recently attracted some heat by releasing two “funny” toddler tees, both emblazoned with the “YOUNG ASPIRING ARTIST” motto, with “ARTIST” crossed out. Scrawled beneath are two alternative career paths: “Astronaut” and “President” (although, really, we don’t think these careers are any easier to attain). Twitter users voiced their offense, and soon after, artist Steve Ogden humorously modified the designs, overwriting “YOUNG ASPIRING OLD NAVY EXEC” with “ARTIST” and “HUMAN.” Here’s a response from the company, as published on artnet News:

“At Old Navy we take our responsibility to our customers seriously. We would never intentionally offend anyone, and we are sorry if that has been the case. Our toddler tees come in a variety of designs including tees that feature ballerinas, unicorns, trucks, and dinosaurs, and [they] include phrases like ‘Free Spirit.’ They are meant to appeal to a wide range of aspirations. With this particular tee, as a result of customer feedback, we have decided to discontinue the design and will work to remove the item from our stores.” (Source)

Overall, the initial designs and the subsequent outcry reminds us that we shouldn’t disparage our artists. For those who are determined, it is plausible to develop a career in such fields—and there is value in it. After all, who could live in a world without art? (Via artnet News)

 

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Max Lamb’s Artistic Process Involves Pouring Molten Pewter Into Sand . You Won’t Believe What Happens Next

max lamb

max lamb

An excavation artist, if there ever was such a thing, Max Lamb creates beautiful works of art and furniture using Mother Nature as one of his tools.  On a beach in Cornwall, England, Lamb uses primitive sand casting techniques to make his pieces. One of the earliest forms of casting, sand casting requires low-tech materials and systems.  Attracted to this method, Lamb employed this simple technique to create the pewter stool depicted in the video.  His knowledge of techniques, materials and his skill allow Lamb to explore method and medium in a unique way.  There is a sense of adventure to Lamb’s work, which makes his process as interesting as the final product itself.  His practice consists of an artistic honesty and respect for process that induces excitement and surprise.  Watching Lamb excavate his pewter creation from the sand evokes a sense of wonder and an awareness of magic.

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Rebecca Baumann’s Party Streamer Installations

Australian based artist Rebecca Baumann often uses what appear to be party supplies to build sculptures and installations.  Her art interacts with the surrounding air – the space it occupies and even the breeze that makes it dance.  From a bus station teeming inside with colorful streamers to vibrant books flapping in the wind, Baumann’s work is unexpectedly playful.  However, the temporary nature of her materials and the relatively short-lived ‘performances’ of her installations hint at something much more weighty behind each piece.

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