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Kristin Smith’s Photographs of Blurred-Out Bodies in Motion

 

Diggin’ on this Bodies of Thought photo series from San Francisco based artist and photographer Kristin Smith. The pictures deal with the concept of “an intelligent body, where the body’s thoughts are realized through movement.” Smith’s process removes any normal definition of personality from the figures and reveals, instead, a more ethereal consciousness that perhaps resides within us all. The works, blurred bodies full of motion set against black backgrounds, come off as very pure. Smiths models for the series (some of which, over the years, have been professional dancers) find a way, through Smith’s eye, to release a particularly distilled form of expression. “Intellect” is definitely present here, but not that of any worldly concerns. This series goes above (or below) the surface. (via)

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Santa And His Crew Are Naughty When They Aren’t being nice

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Tis the Season from Jens & Anna on Vimeo.

Ever wondered what Santa and his crew are up to during their time off? Watch the above hilarious short animation by Jenns & Anna and find out.

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Yuki Onodera’s Silhouette

I’m loving these silhouette photographs by Yuki Onodera. Check out her show in NYC at Yossi Milo Gallery opening April 7th.

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Young Candy Maker Shinri Tezuka Creates Realistic Lollipops That Are Almost Too Pretty To Eat

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Young Japanese artist/candy maker Shinri Tezuka keeps a centuries old tradition alive known as amezaiku. This is the art of making lollipops from sugar, water, starch and food coloring. What makes Tezuka unique is how he takes this technique to the next level by creating beautiful creatures which are almost too good to eat.
His latest creations are of the aquatic variety and engage in an almost scientific-like aesthetic. His work becomes a study in temporary beauty and in this case water creatures such as lion head goldfish, frogs and tadpoles are elegantly rendered. Their ultra realistic nature hints at the eerie and tends to look similar to watercolor paintings or glass sculptures one might find in a curio shop.  Much more than a candy made to be consumed Tezuka takes it to the next level with craft and allows the sweet sticks to cross over into fine art. The realistic quality make them almost impossible to eat because of their beautiful aesthetic.
The first candies resembling Lollipops date back to the middle ages when nobility would eat boiled sugar on sticks. The modern day lollipop is credited to a man named George Smith who trademarked the name in 1931 after a racehorse named Lolly pop. He originaly sold soft rather than hard candy on a stick. When broken down the word lolly pop means tongue slap. (via spoontamago)

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Claire Rosen Inserts Herself Into Dark Version Of Classic Fairy Tales

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Photographer Claire Rosen uses self portraiture as a way to transport the viewers into a world of fairytales. Through her aptly named series Fairy Tales and other Stories, she creates fantastical worlds where the isolated subjects surround themselves with scenes of nature, piles of books, and more. Often, their faces are obscured in the darker, more introspective version of these classic stories.

Rosen’s work mirrors her unconscious, and she explains in her artist statement:

Inside my dreams, I am someone else.  I create characters, like alter egos, presented as recognizable archetypes.  The figure inside the image often looks away from the viewer, the face hidden by the turn of the body or by a mask.  I hope that the viewer will imagine themselves inside fairytale, and interpret the narrative of the image as one might interpret a fairytale, searching for hidden meeting inside the story.

 

This series speaks to living in the 21st Century, a time when we are constantly bombarded with noise, information and moving images.  Still imagery, by contrast, allows us to shut out the noise and hear ourselves.  I use photography to both escape and convey the overwhelming nature of our modern reality.

 

The pastoral setting of this work recalls a simpler time, while reminding us of humanity’s attempt to conquer the enormity of nature.  I draw on themes in classic fairytales – beauty, chastity, and passivity – not as a comment on post-feminism, but as an expression of a more universal experience.  My aim with the use of folklore is to suggest the continuity of the human condition: outside, the physical world changes with dizzying speed; inside, our cerebral world remains timeless.

Visit Rosen’s website to see even more of Fairy Tales and other Stories, and follow her Instagram to see more whimsical imagery.

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Pearl C Hsiung


I’ve seen a lot of great paintings by Pearl in the past and was excited to feature her work in Issue: V of Beautiful/Decay. However I hadn’t seen much of her work until I stumbled onto her website today. The videos are hilarious and tie into her paintings nicely. This new discovery does make me wonder whether the video work came first or the paintings?

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The all-convenient iPad-perfect for porn!

This street art production in the city of San Francisco has been brought to you by Guys Who Like Porn and their Freedom From Porn network… thanks guys!

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Matt Furie

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What can I say, the recurring imagery of the Luck Dragon from Neverending Story is enough to make me die for Matt Furie’s work. There’s also a series of scary characters that are holding/comforting frail and unthreatening rabbits & children, I don’t know. Amazing.

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