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Don Porcella

Swimming Hole, 8 x 8 x 8 feet, 2008

When I first saw the work of Don Porcella, I found it to be quite humorous,  and with a second glance I realized how much detail he puts into each one of his sculptures. Each one is made of pipe cleaners and  I find all the different things he chooses to make with them quite creative.

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Erik Parker’s Colorful Resistance

I have a massive library of artist books piled towards the sky and I’m always seeking the next artist monograph to add to my book collection so it was a special treat to get Erik Parker: Colorful Resistance in the mail last week.

Erik’s been a friend of Beautiful/Decay for a long time now, first appearing in a feature length interview in Beautiful/Decay Issue: O complete with cover art (Get your copy here). Since then we’ve kept in touch with Erik and followed his work as it continuously evolves, grows, and pushes forward into mind bending and candy coated directions.  Colorful Resistance is the first retrospective look at Erik’s work with over 256 pages and 300 massive images of almost everything Erik has made since the 90’s to feast your eyeballs on. If that’s not enough Erik’s close friend Kaws did a fantastic interview with him at the end of the book where they discuss everything from collecting other young artists artworks to how flowers can look like genitals.

More images of Erik Parker’s Colorful Resistance after the jump!

 

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Daniel Palacios’ Visualized Sound Waves

Artist Daniel Palacios‘ sculpture nearly seems alive.  A length of rope is attached at to a machine at each end and spun.  The spinning rope creates waves against a black backdrop, which are also audible as the rope cuts through the air.  Visitors entering the gallery and their movement then influence the rope’s wave.  The more a visitor moves in front of the installation, the more chaotic the wave pattern.  It’s interesting to note a visitors surprise or sudden discomfort upon realizing their influence on the wave.  The sculpture not only reveals a viewers impact on sonic surroundings, but also concretely presents also seems to eerily acknowledge each viewers existence in space and movement.

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Unreal Holographic Wire Sculptures By Seung Mo Park

Seung Mo Park - Sculpturewire Sculpturewire Sculpture wire Sculpture

South Korean artist Seung Mo Park crafts wire into sculpture and the two-dimensional into the three-dimensional. With his Maya series, he painstakingly recreates photographs into holographic wire sculptures with downright ethereal results.
Using stainless steel wire mesh, Park creates his sculptures layer by layer, snipping away to create the illusion of depth and shading. In some cases, it looks as though an artist’s doodle has popped out of his sketchbook. Park shows his versatility in creating boldly three-dimensional sculptures as well as pieces that perfectly imitate the graininess of a black-and-white photo.

His work is stunningly photorealistic.

Though many of his sculptures are hauntingly evocative, his subjects caught mid-despair or appearing like vengeful steely-eyed angels, Park also has a playful side. In a work called “MAYA MONA LIZA,” he pays homage to the most mysterious smile in the world. In his Object series, he recreates known objects such as a contrabass and famous sculptures like “The Thinker.” With his treatment, they almost seem to emerge out of the static, in some cases only merely suggesting form and function. A piece called “Buddha,” created with bronze wire and fiber glass, looks as though a person is being buried in a sand dune of time. In other works, from his Human series, his subjects spring to life fully formed.

If you gaze at Park’s work for long enough, it almost seems as though he has dialed into some special channel caught between realities. A slight turn to the right and maybe his subject will become a real boy once and for all. A slight turn to the left and these ghostly figures might be subsumed forever.

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Greg Ponchak’s Black And White World

Somber black and white photographs by designer Greg Ponchak.

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Lila Jang’s Warped And Bloated 18th-Century Furniture

Lila Jang - sculpture Lila Jang - sculpture
Lila Jang - sculpture
Lila Jang - sculpture

South Korean artist Lila Jang is a sculptor who creates distorted effigies of traditional 18th-century French furniture. From bloated footstools to levitating wall lamps, Jang’s anthropomorphic furniture subverts upper-class affectations into warped Lewis Carroll-inspired imagery, evoking wonder and bewilderment in equal measure at the surreal shapes her furniture take on. Jang received her BFA in Sculpture from Honik University in her hometown of Seoul before moving to Paris to attend École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts for her MFA, and has since gained international acclaim through group shows and art fairs around the globe. According to Jang, her work is a representation of the current state of humanity, stuck “in the midpoint of that constant struggle between reality and the ideal.”

Jang drew inspiration for the series of fantasy furniture from the limitations she found within her cramped apartment in Paris, where tables and chairs only seemed to fit if they were bent out of shape first. The surreality behind the work is also inspired by Jang’s desire to break away from a quotidian routine, turning familiar, unremarkable furnishings into exceptional works of art. Although the pieces are gestural and whimsical in design, the true achievement of the work lies in its retention of the practical applications of the furniture. Even with the canapé climbing the wall, don’t you still want to curl up in it with a book? It’s all the same with Jang’s less functional pieces, such as the warped dining chairs: one can easily picture her pieces fitting right in at any number of houses built by contemporary architects. Jang’s most recent solo exhibition took place at the Centre Culturel de Coreen in Paris where she now lives, presumably in a larger apartment filled with her collection of fantastically anthropomorphic fittings.

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Made With Color Presents: Garrett Haye’s Odd Altars To Everything And Nothing

Garrett Hayes sculpture

Garrett Hayes sculpture

Garrett Hayes sculpture

Beautiful/Decay has partnered with premiere website building platform Made With Color  to bring you some of the most exciting contemporary art work today. Made With Color allows you to build a website that is professional and easy to use with just a few clicks and no coding. It’s so easy, you can start a website and finish it in one afternoon. So if you’re thinking about a website redesign or building a new website, get started on your free trial today. This week we bring you the mixed media sculptures of LA artist Garrett Hayes.

No material is safe when it comes to the dynamic and inventive sculptures of Garrett Hayes. Trained originally as a ceramist, Hayes takes the technical know-how of the world of ceramics and combines it with both found and hand made objects to create shrine like sculptures that are full of disparate materials, surfaces, and textures. His work is a collage of the odd and the ordinary, becoming totemic shrines to anything and nothing in particular.

About his use of materials Hayes states:

These things have all become relics: remnants from time, nature and life, now united in sculpture.  They are collected specifically for my desire to see that artifact live on in the new context of my choosing.  I consider myself the savior of these things.  Without me, they would sit hidden on shelves, end up in the dump, rot away completely, or some other variation on the fate of discarded objects.  So, I collect; cut, burn, suspend, stain, paint, sand, wax and sometimes I do nothing.  I stack, attach, drape, stretch and alter.  I make the pieces that blend in and stick out.  Putting on display things that never were intended to be displayed the way they now exist. 

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Kaveh Golestan’s Photographs Of Iran’s Red Light District

From 1975 until 1977, Iranian photojournalist Kaveh Golestan captured the lives of the women in Tehran’s red light district. Although primarily known for documenting war and conflict in the Middle East, Golestan’s project involving these women gives light to a different issue, one that has not seen the spotlight in years if not never in Iranian society.

“Some of the women were tragically charred to death during the blaze and several others were arrested and later faced the revolutionary firing squads in the summer of 1980.”

Golestan’s series, comprised of 45 black-and-white photographs, reveals an honest but explicit look the women that lived this lifestyle in a region formerly known as Citadel of Shahr-e No. Due to their rare and insightful qualities, the photographs where immediately released in the Iranian newspaper ‘Ayandegan’ and later, in 1978, they were shown at the University of Tehran. The exposure of such imagery, however, alarmed authorities, and the exhibition was shut down after 14 days without an official explanation. A year after the exhibition, the Citadel (the place where Golestan shoot these photographs) burned to the ground during the 1979 Iranian revolution.

Today, these photographs remain as records of Iranian history but also an a courageous and beautiful series of art photography. Today, Golestan’s “The Citadel”, an exhibition devoted to these women, will be showing at Foam in Amsterdam starting in March 21 until May 4th, 2014.  Apart from the images, the exhibition will also feature Golestan’s personal journal entries and essays relating to his experiences traveling the region, illuminating the stories of the Citadel’s forgotten women. ( via Huff Post)

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