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Guy-Olivier Deveau’s Next Level Sand Sculptures

Guy Olivier Deveau sand sculptures

sand sculptures

sand sculptures

sand sculptures

Guy-Olivier Deveau’s sculptures would be fascinating in any medium, the fact that he works with sand and ice makes them that much more appealing and interesting.  Deveau started out sand sculpting as a summer job in Quebec City so he could earn money to finance his education in the filed of philosophy.  Now that he’s a sculptor full-time the Canadian artist travels around the world creating his ephemeral sculptures and competing in competitions.  Though he also works with wood, snow and ice, Deveau appreciates sand as a medium because he feels he can achieve his desired texture, shadow and edges.  Indeed, his final products are amazing feats considering their medium.  Each of his sculptures takes approximately three days to create and each requires an immense amount of patience.  Deveau starts with a sold sand block and slowly and carefully carves from that.

Deveau will often include themes relating to philosophy, mythology or psychology, incorporating his interests along with his talent.  For instance, his most recent sculpture made on a beach in Texas, Bleeding, features a horizontal face, seemingly melting back into the ground.  The agony and expression of the face are remarkable taking into account that they were carved out of sand.  Though his was one of many sand sculptures created for Sandcastle Days 2013, the sophisticated emotion of Deveau’s Bleeding allowed it to stand out as eye-catching and thought provoking.

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David Emitt Adams Creates Photographs Of The Southwest On Tin Cans Found In The Desert

David Emitt Adams - Wet-Plate Collodion Print on Found Object David Emitt Adams - Wet-Plate Collodion Print on Found Object

David Emitt Adams - Wet-Plate Collodion Print on Found Object

David Emitt Adams beautifully captures the landscape of the Southwest on the surface of discarded tin cans along with other debris he finds in the desert. Growing up in Yuma, Arizona, he is no stranger to the desert and the objects inhabiting it. Adams explains that deserts, naturally being so barren, are often used as a dumping site for garbage. This is where he finds all of his materials, with some tin cans being up to four decades old. He combines classic and iconic Southwest imagery with the reality of the state of the land today. Although the present day desert still holds immense and vast beauty, it is not without the remnants of urban sprawl left behind.

Throughout history, the West has long been photographed and documented due to its breathtaking and often unbelievable, natural landscapes. Adams not only pays homage to this tradition, but to its traditional processes as well. Inspired by the history of photography, the process he uses was one of the first methods of photography invented. Adams chosen method of photography is not your everyday digital photograph. He uses a labor intensive process invented in the mid-19th century called “wet-plate collodion.” This complicated process not only takes time, but an impressive amount of skill. Adams’ technical talents are only matched by the creativity of his body of work. Each tin can’s rich, red patina is still intact as they bend and twist around their lids, which hold the delicate image of the desert. This series, Conversations with History, is just one of several series in which Adams uses this traditional method of photography to express his artistic vision.

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Winter In Hell

Winter 2010, the stunning landscape of Iceland succumbs to the Arctic cold. Beaches and lakes get frozen, but something unexpected is going to happen… the earth shakes, warms up, and suddenly a big crack opens up at the top of the glacier Eyjafjallajokull. Lava, smoke, ash and fire come up from the depth of the earth, melting everything in its path.

Video by: Enrique Pacheco, Music by Die! Goldstein
P.S. It’s 75 and sunny today in Los Angeles

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An Interactive Building That Changes Colors Depending On Your Perspective And Time Of Day

Rob-Ley-Architecture-7Rob-Ley-Architecture-2Rob-Ley-Architecture-5

Founder of Los Angeles-based architecture and design studio Urbana, Rob Ley has yet made another venture into the world of interactive architectural installations. This time large-scale. His project “May-September” features a field of 7,000 angled multi-color metal panels constructed onto the facade of Eskenazi Hospital in Indianapolis.

According to Ley, the project began when he started wondering about the typical notion of the parking structure. Often these huge concrete constructions are unappreciated and ignored by public. Ley posed himself a challenge to turn it into a dynamic system that would interact with the viewers as they pass it by.

Together with Indianapolis Fabrications, they’ve built a huge angular aluminum and stainless steel installation (12,500 square feet) that also features an east/west color strategy (yellow and blue). The visual experience of changing colors and patterns depends on observers’ perspective and speed when they move across the hospital grounds or drive along the street. The piece also interacts with nature as every sun beam or cloud can shape the hues and saturation of colors.

As in nature, the volume and shade offered by the piece shies away from harsh, geometric patterning – instead tending towards a gentle, dappled variability in form <…> [parts of installation] work together as brush strokes to create a dynamic façade <…>.

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Jon Rafman’s New Age Demanded


Montreal-based artist Jon Rafman‘s series New Age Demanded is dominated by a distorted, bodiless figure made from textures and skin taken from paintings by artists – such as Gerhard Richter and Franz Kline – and made anew. With the aid of photoshop, Rafman collages numerous different elements onto the deformed classical bust and its background to mix old with new, high art with low art, and craft with technology. More after the jump.

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Fabio Viale’s Marble Sculptures That Look Like Styrofoam

What at first may look like a Styrofoam Mona Lisa is actually incredibly detailed marble work by Italian artist Fabio Viale. Yes you read that right. Marble. Viale does some incredible work to modernize this “old-fashioned” medium, like re-creating Greek Korus torsos and hands covered in tattoos. He is able to transform this heavy, bulky material into creations that seem light and airy, like old beat up tires, popcorn or crumpled paper bags. Viale even went so far as to create a marble motorboat he called Ahgalla, which remarkably he used to navigate the rivers north of Italy. 

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Maarten Alexander vs Rul3rs

Maarten Alexander &  Rul3rs have come together to create a series of  arresting images combining Maarten’s clean photographic sensibilites and Rul3rs’ coded mathematical and religious symbols.

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Build Your New Mobile Optimized Portfolio Site With Made With Color!


It’s almost February and you’ve likely had “build a new website” on your to-do list for a while, but haven’t gotten around to it. Beautiful/Decay has teamed up with our friends at Made With Color to give you a friendly nudge to create your new site on their easy to use and sleek website building platform.  All you you have to do is enter code NEWYEARS2014 for a 29% discount off your first year with them.

Building a site doesn’t have to be a long, painstaking process. Now’s the perfect time to get started! Join the ranks of other MWC users who built their responsive, mobile/tablet friendly, and SEO optimized sites in under an hour.

We can’t wait to see what your new site looks like, so act fast– this discount code expires 2/15/15!

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