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Art:21 Season 5!

Usually I don’t get too excited about shows on PBS but I have to say that Art:21 is by far the best thing i’ve ever watched on public television. If you’re not familiar with the show, Art: 21 is the only prime time show dedicated exclusively to contemporary artists. Each season follows 14 of the biggest names in the art world as they walk you through their conceptual process, studio practice and share rare behind the scenes footage of work in progress. Some of my favorite episodes from previous seasons include the legendary interview with Barry Mcgee and his wife Margaret Kilgallen and LA painter Lari Pittman. This is a must see show for anyone interested in the international contemporary art world.

I received a preview copy of Season 5 and I’m happy to announce that it does not disappoint with another set of interviews with art legends such as John Baldessari, Cao Fei, Cindy Sherman, Jeff Koons, and many more.

Season 5 premieres Wednesday, October 7, 2009, at 10:00 p.m. (ET).
More Art:21 trailers after the jump.

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Michael Leon

Michael Leon

Michael Leon was born in 1974 in Tampa, Florida, graduated from CalArts in 1997, and is currently based in Los Angeles. He was a co-creator of Commonwealth Stacks, Rasa Libre, and Nike’s Tech Pack. He has contributed design and art direction to Fourstar Clothing, Girl Skateboards, Stussy, DC, Arkitip, and most recently, Nike SB. Throughout the past 20 years, Michael Leon has been influential to the worlds of both design and skateboarding, his style is in a class of its own.

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Yoshihiko Satoh Rocks Out

Japanese artist Yoshihiko Satoh’s takes  mass produced musical instruments and stretches, enlarges, manipulates, and contorts them into objects that unleash the energey residing in their function and shape.

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Diane Han Illustrates Friendly Fish Taco, Unicorn Flies And Other Funny Creatures

Diane Han

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Diane Han is an illustrator and graphic designer originally from Korea, but now living and working in Los Angeles. While diverse, a common thread through Diane’s work is a play on words. Working largely with acrylic on paper, Diane plays with different means of representing animals in order to tell a story that is often critically and socially driven, while still managing to be so approachable and pleasant. I personally love the skunk piece after the jump, talk about a problem-solver.

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Gwen Murphy Creates Fantastical Creatures With Shoes

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For her wildly imaginative series Foot Fetish, the artist Gwen Murphy creates shoes with carefully rendered faces. Her sculptures range from the humorous to the frightful, from high end footwear to more casual designs. Murphy’s lifelike characters blend seamlessly into the shoes they inhabit, recontextualizing well-worn Converse One Stars, pumps, and ballet flats. Here, footwear ceases to be a passive participant in our daily lives, waiting patiently for our feet; instead, shoes become fantastical creatures with lives of their own.

Murphy’s uncanny creations draw from pop culture and folklore alike. “Planet of the Sneakers,” is a clever yet earnest adaptation of the 1968 film “Planet of the Apes.” Celebrity fortune teller phenomenon Madame Zora makes an appearance in a pair of glittery pink kitten heels, and one-eyed Waldgeist, Germanic forest spirits, nestle amiably in a pair slippers. “Guardians of the Basilisk” places a pair of austere women in faux snake skin pumps; unlike the victims of the serpentine creature, who can kill simply by meeting a mortal’s gaze, they stare upwards, their eyes unfazed. “Judith,” a piece made from a pair of T-strap pumps, might be imagined as the biblical heroine; like the Jewish woman who slayed Holofernes, she is shown both as resolute (left shoe) and as gravely apprehensive, her eyes darting back and forth (right shoe).

With Foot Fetish, Murphy elegantly inverts our expectations, placing the face and head where the feet should be. Her shoes, no longer able to serve the purpose for which they were designed, take on new life. In this off-beat, upside-down realm, are delightful moments where the magical and practical collide. (via Agonistica)

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Jennifer Poon

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I am very excited about today’s blog posts as I will be writing about a few of my most favorite artists. The first of them being San Francisco based painter, Jennifer Poon. Jennifer creates a fragile and fragmented world that which communicates her personal experiences, race, social identity, sexuality, etc. Her paintings always has a way of having me reflect on my relationship to the world and those around me.

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Polar Vortex- Andy Goldsworthy’s Ice and Snow Sculptures

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Although most of America (currently enduring one of the worst winter cold snaps in nearly two decades) would like to ignore this fact in for favor of bundled layers and heated blankets, sometimes even the dire cold, snow and ice can provide the tools and inspiration for those who brave it’s elements.  Famed land and installation artist Andy Goldsworthy (previously here and here) has often utilized ice, frost, snow and frozen earth to create his trademark land interventions. And rather than avoiding the elements, Goldsworthy is only able to create these delicate and precise sculptures by embracing the cold.

In Goldsworthy’s 2004 documentary, Rivers & Tides, several scenes document the difficulty in attempting to harness the cold’s elements. One scene shows the artist, braving the winter elements for hours at a time in finger-less gloves (so as to be able to properly feel and hold the materials) fusing together icicle chunks together with warm water, holding them in place while they freeze together into naturally-made though unnatural shapes. The smallest temperature changes, light, and even chance cause the ice sculpture to collapse, repeatedly, which is all part of Goldsworthy’s process. Says the artist, “Movement, change, light, growth and decay are the lifeblood of nature, the energies that  I try to tap through my work. I need the shock of touch, the resistance of place, materials and weather, the earth as my source. Nature is in a state of change and that change is the key to understanding. I want my art to be sensitive and alert to changes in material, season and weather. Each work grows, stays, decays. Process and decay are implicit. Transience in my work reflects what I find in nature.”

Goldsworthy’s process is only captured through the use of photographs, and the often detailed notes (below) which the artist uses to document the difficulties and triumphs of each individual piece.

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Kotama Bouabane’s Words Will Melt You

Kotama Bouabane’s melting word series says everything you’re thinking in you’re head but are afraid to say out loud with the help of some water and a bit of cold air.

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