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A Day In Decay: 1994-1997

barry mcgee twist 12oz. prophet magazine
1994-1997 were significant years in my life. I was stuck in the suburbs rotting away at a high school where nothing of interest ever happened. I spent my weekends riding the metro into D.C. to paint graffiti, go to hardcore shows, skateboard and generally cause mischief. (Remember that the internet was in its early stages, so finding a cool magazine that covered my interests was a rare feat.) 12 oz. Prophet was one of my main sources of inspiration. Primarily covering graffiti and what would eventually be called “street art,” 12 oz. was ahead of the curve. 12 oz. is still around, so if you need a graffiti fix check out their site. The issue pictured above featured a great interview with Twist (Barry Mcgee). Only a few of you know about this, but the name “Beautiful/Decay” actually comes from the last question in the interview: “Raven – You’re really into shit that’s all rundown and decaying, huh?” And Twist responded: “I love stuff that’s rundown, rusted, beautiful decay, a state of decay.” I didn’t start B/D immediately after reading the interview, but the phrase “Beautiful Decay” stuck in my head for weeks. Finally, after reading several ‘zines at shows and trying to find something meaningful to do with my time I decided to put the phrase to good use and start our humble lil ‘zine.

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The Mystical Paintings of Ariana Papademetropoulos

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Ariana Papademetropoulos’ long last name may be the very thing that inspires her mystic paintings. Or, at least that’s just what I’d like to believe. I saw her work during CalARTS’ open studios and it was definitely some of my favorite stuff on display. Especially, since it deals with spiritualism in a way that’s remarkably beautiful. Just look at her paintings of crystals that have hidden reflections of women and symbols, which can entrance the viewer into a reflective stare. There’s much more going on in Ariana’s work than one’s initial glance.

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“One Minute Puberty” Animation Accurately Sums Up The Awkward Process

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Remember that awkward period of your life called puberty? The one that you might like to forget? Well, Berlin-based artist Alexander Gellner reminds us in a short animation that sums it all up in a little over a minute. It’s called One Minute Puberty and it captures the essence of what its like to go through this stage.

We see the main character experience a lot of changes, from pimples, to growth spurts, and discovering their own identity. The video’s energy is non-stop beginning to end thanks to the track and sound design by Niklas A Kröger. It’s reflective about how it feels to grow up and the wish of getting older so you don’t have to deal with puberty anymore.

Gellner tells the site Cartoon Brew that One Minute Puberty was part of his graduation project from HTW Berlin.  The school didn’t have an animation department but they allowed him to make his film anyways. It was completed over the course of seven weeks.

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Return As An Animal

A Short movie about the myth of the eternal return of life after death by Bruno Dicolla. It’s kind of awesome.

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Is Social Media a Useful Marketing Tool for Artists?

"instagram logo copyright free Virginia S" (CC BY 2.0) by vastateparksstaff

“instagram logo copyright free Virginia S” (CC BY 2.0) by vastateparksstaff

What is art? Well, if Edgar Degas was right and art “is not what you see” but “what you make others see”, then art can be anything. However, what if the vision someone else has isn’t quite what you expected? And what if this vision is bound by a ton of T&Cs? This kind of issue has become prominent since visual material has taken over social media.

When Instagram first launched in 2010 it was a social network where users could share their personal pictures. Since then, it has grown and evolved into a platform where businesses, social influencers and even artists can showcase their work.

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Jenn Ackerman Photographs The Reality Of Mentally Ill Prisoners In America

“To accurately portray the reality of living with mental illness for prisoners in an effort to call attention to the increased imprisonment of the mentally ill in the US” is the stated goal of Jenn Ackerman’s series Trapped.

Ackerman began photographing inside Kentucky State Reformatory in 2008. Over the course of her time there she gained trust of the inmates and guards and unprecedented access to their facility and procedure. The resulting series is a stunning look inside the experience of the mentally ill shuffled through a prison system not equipped to withstand, care for, or rehabilitate them. A system in dire need of attention and reform. (via)

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Lutz Bacher And The Celestial Handbook

Lutz Bacher‘s recent exhibition at San Francisco’s Ratio 3 included the series The Celestial Handbook: offset book pages taken from found copies of amateur astronomer Robert Burnham Jr.‘s 1966 handbook of the same title. Each page — there are 85 in the series — is individually framed, forever capturing timeless subjects in a dated format. What we see are images of things that surpass the power of imagery with captions that can’t help but fall short in describing things that surpass the power of language. (via)

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Priscila De Carvalho’s Majestic Brazil

Paintings and sculptures collide and meld together in the installations of Priscila De Carvalho.

“The visual form of my installation originates in memories of my childhood home—an island in the southern part of Brazil—a serene setting surrounded by the sea, with majestic palm trees and lonely houses scattered along the shore, and crowned by a vibrantly colored sky at dusk. The content is fueled by the writings of Maria Manuela Margarido and Alda do Espirito Santo and personal memories of my country’s political resistance to colonialism. My lifelong social and political awareness began at an early age and, ultimately, found its way into my art in the form of figurative narratives that portray the joy and resilience of the human spirit confronted with social and political hardships. Specific imagery in By the Sea (parrots, coconut palms and the evening sky) was taken from Margarido’s poem Nightfall, which reflects on the disjunction between childhood dreams and adult realities and reminds its readers to dream high.”

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