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Russell Kleyn

Russell Kleyn

 

Jumping between equally beautiful almost commercial shots and conceptual pieces, Russell Kleyn excels in seeing the beauty in less than ordinary situations.

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Abstract Paintings Created With The Help Of Larvae

Emil Lukas - Painting Emil Lukas - Painting

Emil Lukas - Painting

Emil Lukas doesn’t actually paint, and half the time he has larvae do it for him. The Pennsylvanian artist’s recent exhibition at Sperone Westwater Gallery was comprised of two bodies of work: one of paintings made entirely with fine thread, and the other artworks with many layers of larvae trails recorded in ink. His strategies to create these works are particular, and in the case of the larvae pretty unconventional. Lukas’ creativity is reactive and set in the present. With his thread paintings, he mounts one thread across the canvas, considers its placement and compositional purpose, and then continues the same process with the next. In a macro and micro sense the work is contemplative, as each thread is placed with purpose, but also that the final composition should turn out having the same slow and purposeful glow as the act itself.

In the summer, Lukas keeps fly larvae eggs in a converted Tractor Factory that he uses to create his ink-path pieces. He covers the larvae in ink, and uses light and shadow to manipulate their route. After, he applies a translucent wash over the trails, and repeats. The level of control that Lukas can maintain is both impressive and essential, as the strategy seems to form a good balance between chance and design that produces consistent but unexpected work. The paths end up looking like tree roots or coral. Nature is ever-present in the layers of Lukas’ paintings. (Via Artnet)

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Dan Cretu Transforms Real Bananas Into Sculptures By Carving Intricate Geometric patterns Into Them

Dan Cretu - Photography 2 Dan Cretu - Photography 1

The trendiest bananas are far from looking yellow. Dan Cretu doesn’t let them stay that way. He gets them ready to strike a pose by handcarving and handpainting each one of them with geometric patterns, textures and vivid colors. No second degree, no political message; just the brilliant idea of admiring creative and colorful images.
Strangely enough they leave a taste in the mouth, the one of bananas of course, but with a twist of positivity and spontaneity. So many ideas to embellish a fruit, as we scroll down the “Bananametric Series” we can imagine that if the fruit was genetically modified by the artist we could end up with a large pallet of banana varieties.

Dan Cretu masters his art: by blending food sculpture with photography he offers the world a new idea of conceptual design. In his previous work he put together orange and lemon peels to make a camera. Due to its fragile nature, this process has to be done quickly as the fruits deteriorate. The peels, arranged in an unexpected environment rather than in a kitchen let’s say, generates in this case an eco-art visual identity.
That’s the purpose of Dan Cretu: “all objects and things around us daily are possible subjects for me. The challenge is to transform a common object that we don’t notice anymore into something unusual, alive, and appealing.”

Follow Dan Cretu on Dan Cretu Facebook and order printed high quality photographies on Etsy. (via Demilked)

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Ruben Plasencia’s Photographs Of The Blind Explore The Concept Of Prejudice

Ruben Plasencia

Ruben Plasencia Ruben Plasencia Ruben Plasencia

Ruben Plasencia settled on the idea of photographing the blind when contemplating how to approach the subject of prejudice as an artist.  He felt that blind individuals are unique because they are subject to prejudice, but don’t generate prejudice against others the way people who can see do.  His series, Obscure, forces viewers to look directly into the eyes of people who cannot return the stare.

Working with ONCE, Spain’s national organization for the blind, to complete the project, Plasencia found himself incredibly moved by the experience.  Of the project he writes:

Racist prejudices and stereotypes continue to dominate our societies — judgments which are made at a level that is only skin-deep. In “Obscure”, I created portraits of the blind. These faces create a mockery of our unthinking dependence on vision. A blind person seeks more reliable ways to read between the lines and understood essences, no longer able to fall back on their eyesight as the only reliable means.

I composed the portraits in a simple manner: a figure and a ground. I wanted to eliminate as many external factors as possible and leave behind only what’s most important to me: “The Look”.

Far from being a simple visual appetizer, this project ventures to convey the deepest intimacy of the look. By gazing upon eyes which cannot see, I want us feel deeply what it means to have sight. Despite having the gift of vision, we manage to blind ourselves every day. We are all given the great opportunity to observe and I hope we can appreciate its value. (via LensCulture)

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Russia’s Life-Size Land Cruiser Made Out Of Ice

The annual International Ice And Snow Festival that takes place in Perm, Russia has resulted in this impressive sculpture. Carved entirely out of one solid block of ice, a group of artists produced this 1:1 scale Toyota Land Cruiser complete with an open door and interior seating. From an outsiders perspective the work can be viewed as commentary on the current state of the automobile industry or the false perception of wealth and success. (via)

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Spinning Screen Transforms Flat Images Into Light Sculptures

Benjamin Muzzin installation7 Benjamin Muzzin installation5

Transforming the two dimensional into three dimensions has obsessed artists for centuries. Benjamin Muzzin takes an interesting approach to this familiar challenge.  Working in conjunction with the University of Art and Design, Lausanne, Switzerland (ECAL) created the video Full Turn.  The piece seems to begin with a simple LCD screen television.  Soon the screen is spinning quickly and the illuminated design seems to take on a certain depth.  Due to the speed of the spinning screen the light blurs and nearly seems to produce a floating light sculpture.

The television screen embodies the two dimensional image, perhaps similarly to the way paintings had for previous centuries.  Using a digital screen to “carve out” a sculpture of light is a challenge Muzzin was intentionally sought.  He goes on to explain:

“With this project I wanted to explore the notion of the third dimension, with the desire to try to get out of the usual frame of a flat screen. For this, my work mainly consisted in exploring and experimenting a different device for displaying images, trying to give animations volume in space. The resulting machine works with the rotation of two screens placed back to back, creating a three-dimensional animated sequence that can be seen at 360 degrees. Due to the persistence of vision, the shapes that appear on the screen turn into kinetic light sculptures.”

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Sten Lex’s Massive OP Art Hand Cut Stencil Portraits

Italian street art duo Sten Lex  are considered as pioneers in their use of the stencil in Italy. Starting their career in their hometown of Rome in 2001, they rapidly acquired an international reputation.  Their work consists of portraits of anonymous characters that they photograph as well as portraits from album covers from the ‘60s and ‘70s. Moving between op art and stencil work STEN LEX is based on a technical finesse and unprecedented accuracy in their remarkable art. Their technique, which they named “Hole School”, is a meticulous hand cut stencil process. They make a thin frame consisting of thousands of paper lines. From the contrast of the black and white lines, the portrait emerges. The visual illusion of the stencil is thus part of the work. The walls on which the stencils are pasted up and the eventual evolution of the paper are hence an equal part of the artwork. Watch a video of their labor intensive process after the jump.

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Duda Lanna

A native of Porto Alegre, Brazil, artist Duda Lanna creates colorful paintings and illustrations of often mind-bending detail. The artist claims inspirations both within the realm of visual arts and separate from them, including science fiction and psychedelic rock of the ’70s. These diverse inspirations definitely show in his many works in ink and acrylic. Their vibrant color palette and bold graphic patterns will take you on a trip, that is for sure. Folks, hold on to your eyeballs.

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