Get Social:

Kate Lacour’s Anatomical Drawings Gone Wild

14330241315_0e65d6d68c_b14329537404_d578dfa885_b 14326918741_c44c8d0de6_o14326918621_11dd5e2ec0_o

James Thurber said, “Humor is emotional chaos remembered in tranquility,” which seems to be a tactic comic artist and illustrator Kate (Ellen) Lacour has mastered in her recent drawing series Bodies, which she has only described with three words,  “body horror beauty.” The motives, inspiration, or goals behind the series have not been disclosed, yet appear to be a distinct side-project from her usual cartooning work, replacing a visually lighter style with a combination of human anatomical drawings found in textbooks. The results twist the familiar style of textbook, anatomical human renderings, creating drawings which utilize symmetry, unique and unusual body arrangements, and religious or spiritual iconography.

Symbolic poses are taken by transparent, headless bodies, such as the Lotus position, a pose with Hindu, Jain, and Buddhist relevance. Lacour (who perhaps tellingly also works as an art therapist) enhances this peaceful, evocative aesthetic by drawing lines with ink and pen but softly coloring the drawings in with food coloring. However, even with the emphasis of religious and anatomical text, the drawings evoke a humorous effect, replacing heads with comically screaming mouths and adding eyes to the Fallopian tubes of a levitating uterus. The most successful works are those which pack in detail, such as Devouring Mother (first drawing, above) where a creation myth entirely new is presented by mixing tales and traditions of the past. (via hi-fructose)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Andrew Falkowski

Andrew Falkowski just unleashed two new bodies of work Andrew Rafacz Gallery in Chicago, and both are really impressive. Body A – being a series of monochromatic airbrush painting depicting pop iterations of Napolean Bonaparte. Body B – being bold, high contrast paintings of ransom notes constructed from quotes rooted in philosophy and war.  Check them out after the jump…

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Charlotte Cornaton Creates Delicate And Illuminated Books Out Of Porcelain

Cornaton, Ceramics   

Cornaton, Ceramics

Cornaton, Ceramics

Born in Paris and trained in London, visual artist Charlotte Cornaton combines two unlikely platforms—the ancient craft of ceramics and the modern medium of video art—to create multi-faceted, socially-charged pieces. For Insomnio, her latest series, Cornaton focuses heavily on the ceramic side of her practice, creating 21 delicately crafted and hauntingly illuminated porcelain books.

Stunningly handmade and intrinsically dreamy, Insomnio presents and explores the paradoxal nature of clay’s transformation from a heavy, solid medium to a fragile, paper-thin representation of the contents of a book. Created during the artist’s residency in Jingdezhen, China, the pieces—comprised of porcelain and illuminated by hidden LEDS—are directly influenced by ancient techniques and rooted heavily in Chinese culture:

Insomnio is a complication of porcelain sculptural books which explain the symbolism of my nightmares using Jung dream interpretation. The oneiric world is true cerebral storm and the fear of the unconscious is here materialized through the cracks and imperfections of the porcelain . . . I used the three main ancestral Chinese techniques of incised porcelain: carving celadon, cobalt painting and cloisonné glaze. Insomnio thus uses oriental know-how to express western form of thought, incarnating the exchange and symbiosis of cultures.

Adorned with designs and inscribed with text, each book presents the artist’s acquired sense of a culture’s aesthetic and, through both a literal use of light and enlightening symbolism, results in an exhibit based prominently in illumination—literally. 

Currently Trending

Animals Killed In The Name Of Art

In 2004 TINKEBELL. made a purse out of her dearest cat Pinkeltje. Pinkeltje was a ‘depressed cat’ who couldnt be left at home alone. By killing her and making her into a purse, TINKEBELL. could carry her always with her.

The extensive attention to her project ‘My dearest cat Pinkeltje’ received from activists and the media demonstrates that this approach certainly meets with its share of resistance. In this project, she killed her cat with own hands and then had it stuffed and made into a hand bag as a product for consumption, thereby directly bridging the gap between house pet and animal for consumption/production and thus painfully bringing the matter to light. A collection of the threats generated by this and other projects was later published in the book ‘Dearest TINKEBELL

As a life long vegan and animal lover I have been struggling with whether I should post the work of TINKEBELL. Not only do I find the work in terrible taste but I generally don’t like to promote work that involves killing of any kind. However I think this work brings up some interesting questions about what can be considered art and how we define animal cruelty as well as our distinctions between animals that are killed everyday for food, clothing, accessories, and even art (leather) and what animals we wouldn’t dare touch because we have grown to live with them as pets and companions. How do we justify slaughtering millions of cows for Louis Vuitton purses yet get bent out of shape when someone turns a cat into a purse. If I had it my way neither would ever happen but I find it hard to justify one without the other. So what do you think? Is this art and how do we draw distinctions between one animal over the other?

Currently Trending

Andres Guerrero

These are so great. Andres has a masterfull knack for adding depth to collage.(These ARE collaged right?) I wanna run around down there with the numbers….

 

Currently Trending

Amusing Photo Series Imagines If Shoes Had Teeth

shoesshoesshoesshoes

In a surreal and slightly disturbing series titled Running Gag by the Hamburg-based studio POP. Postproduction, they imagine what it would be like if shoes teeth to accompany their tongues. POP specializes in photo-retouching, and manipulated the images has the loafers, boat shoes, and Converse sneakers laughing and grinning. Some have a gap tooth, others a gold grill, while some have hardly any teeth at all.

There is some correspondence with the teeth and the shoe. For instance, the pink canvas shoe with decorative laces has a mouth full of braces, so we’d imagine they are a teenage girl. The gold-studded loafer is an “alternative style” to the preppy shoe, so its gold lip ring feels appropriate.

Despite being slickly-produced and brightly-colored series, the Running Gag is subtle, and it’s only after more than a seconds glance that you realize there are teeth in these shoes. It’s POP’s Photoshopping skills that add to the believability of these characters, and they look liked they’d be right in place in a horror film. (Via Design Taxi)

Currently Trending

Robert William Overweg’s Virtual photographs

Robert William Overweg's virtual photographs

Description of Robert William Overweg’s “Documenting Current Spaces” series:

I have been photographing virtual environments since the end of 2007.

I felt a need to document these worlds because I see them as the new public spaces. I was grasped by their perfect beauty, most of the time copying our own real world. But with constant highlights of beauty. These documentary photographs evolved into a journey of research and questioning.

Is there a difference between a photograph of a simulated object and a photograph of the object taken in real life. Another interesting question, when does popular culture leave the copyright protected arena and become public domain? Aren’t captured experiences instantly the property of the viewer/capturer?

Currently Trending

Peter Nitsch

Shophouses - 4 x 8 m Bangkok

Peter Nitsch’s latest photographic series, “Shophouses,” documents Nitsch’s trip to Bangkok, where he became fascinated with the way in which many Southeast Asian city dwellers live; combining their work and living spaces. In this project, Nitsch explored the diverse cultural and social mix of a rapidly urbanizing Thailand, in order to uncover the basic human qualities that connect his subjects to his work’s viewers.

Currently Trending