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Anders Krisár’s Haunted House

Anders Krisár - Photography

Anders Krisár is an artist and photographer based in Stockholm, I especially love these gloomy rooms and photographic ghosts.

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Esai Ramirez Envisions Crayola Box Sets Inspired By Iconic Works Of Art

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LA based artist and designer, Esai Ramirez, has created an imagined series of art inspired Crayola box sets. With a BFA in advertising, Ramirez has used his eye for marketing along with his talent for design to rebrand classic concepts. Inspired by the Pantone color-coding system, Ramirez has matched specific palettes from iconic works of art and has manufactured them into organized lists of crayon colors. One of the conceived collaborations is with the color theory master himself, Joseph Albers. Here we see an alluring array of orange to match Albers’ Homage to the Square: Glow. The others include palettes influenced by the works of Jen Stark, known for her hypnotic, vibrant paper sculptures, Damien Hurst’s muted, aquatic blues, greens and grays, and, probably most humorously, a full box set of Yves Klein’s signature velvety blue.  He also has created a Crayola/ Pantone collaboration box set in which he imagines hue names such as a vivd red titled “pms 185u.”

Esai Ramirez aims the project to be fun and hopes it “encourages adults to play more with color and art.” His work tends to revolved around the marriage of two concepts, ideally creating a new unified vessel to conceive each one. His states about his work:

“Whether it’s two lovers about to kiss for the first time or two boxers about to slug it out–the things that bring us together as well as pull us apart are what I look for in everything I see.” (via Design Boom)

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Interview with Delicious Storm

NYC based architect Si-Yeon Min, who received training from the University of Michigan and the prestigious GSAPP at Columbia University recently published an interesting limited edition book on creativity. Compiled from his work in a creative field, his book documents how off-the-wall thinking can lead to genuine discovery. The book strikes a chord with the print-lover in me, as each cover design features a different color. Just 25 copies published by Allied Operations.

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Alois Kronschlaeger’s Architectural Interventions

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Habitat, 2012

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Spire, 2011

Alois Kronschlaeger - installation

Skylight Vitrine 2009

Austrian-born artist Alois Kronschlaeger creates work that exists at the intersection of art and architecture.  He is interested in environment and light, and in exploring time and space via geometry.  Often referring to his works as “architectural interventions,” Kronschlaeger is fascinated by the way viewers rearrange themselves within a space occupied by one of his interventions.

At times Kronschlaeger’s work feels surreal, as with Habitat, a large-scale installation in the Mammal Hall of the former Grand Rapids Public Museum.  For Site:Lab 2012 Kronschlaeger created what he called “a very awkward imagery of juxtaposition.”  He took the existing landscape of 27 habitat dioramas built in the mid-20th century and incorporated contemporary architectural interventions.  The impact of the combination of the organic and the geometric was strange and disorienting.   A viewer wonders about what is real and unreal, an inquiry that requires the him to further analyze his experience.

At other times Kronschlaeger’s work feels like pure science fiction, as with Spire, the massive installation he did for Site:Lab in 2011.  For this work Kronschlaeger’s installation occupied three floors of an abandoned commercial building in downtown Grand Rapids.  The work took over six weeks to create and the finished project was a grand demonstration of Kronschlaeger’s interest in environment, light and the ways new materials can revive and transform a space.

Kronschlaeger furthers his inquiries in his less dramatic works as well, such as his skylights, wall pieces and smaller sculptures, which I am particularly drawn to.  This fall he will finish a large work at MOCA Tuscon (see video below), and will then head to Beijing where he will create another site-specific structure.

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Rob Jamieson’s Gothic Suicide Note

Rob Jamieson’s portfolio is full of great work in every material imaginable from painting to video. There isn’t a lot of text on his work about his intentions so you’ll have to do the mental heavy lifting of connecting the dots between various projects but two of my favorites are his loose drawings and his goth suicide note video titled  I Like You Now. Get Out of Here. Go Home. Watch the full video in all it’s gothic jock hating glory after the jump.

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Melissa Godoy-Nieto’s Uses Traditional Mexican Imagery In Untraditional Ways

Melissa Godoy-Nieto - installation Melissa Godoy-Nieto-installation

Melissa Godoy-Nieto - installation

Melissa Godoy-Nieto is a multidisciplinary Mexican artist and designer based in Brooklyn, NY.  Born in Tijuana, Mexico, Godoy-Nieto incorporates pre-hispanic history, art and hieroglyphics with traditional crafts and materials that she uses in untraditional ways.  For her installation at SPRING/BREAK art fair earlier this year Godoy-Nieto painted the inside of a closet with a bright mix of mystical South American imagery, focusing partly on life, and partly on death.  Though she references the vibrant palate, dynamic and hand crafted aesthetic of Mexican culture, her works employ unusual techniques and structures, making the final product relevant and contemporary.

Her “textiles,” which she refers to as paintings, incorporate imagery from traditional Mexican imagery and patterns, but are made with untraditional materials.  Taking the concept a step further, Godoy-Nieto will sometimes link her paintings to spray paint cans using hand-dyed yarn and pushpins.  Describing the works as “experimental murals,” Godoy-Nieto toys with a viewer’s sense of how the work was made; conventional imagery is presented as being created in an unconventional way.  Initially, a viewer might believe the work is made with spray paint, but then he realizes the spray paint is yarn and had nothing to do with forming the actual image.  By challenging expectation and altering dimension, Godoy-Nieto’s process directs the way in which a viewer might interact with or perceive the work, and thus the way he might consider traditional iconography within a contemporary context.

Godoy-Nieto is also the co-founder of The Poetry Club Art Space and Head Visual artist for The Tablets.

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Henrique Oliveira’s Architectural Sculptures Harmoniously Merge Natural And Artificial Components

Henrique Oliveira

Henrique Oliveira

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Brazilian artist Henrique Oliveira creates monumental, site-specific installations that confront the viewer with oddly formed, but organic looking sculptures. Oliveira’s way of shaping and installing the material against the gallery wall make it seem like an ever-changing parasitic growth upon a manufactured, man-made landscape. The objects’ swirls, knots and root-like quality allude to both natural and artificial substances.

The artist’s way of merging varied materials, amongst them recycled wood and decayed debris from the Sao Paolo streets, suggest that the artist is interested in manipulating both indoor and outside space to finally create a harmonious coexistence between urban design, plant life, and biology. (via Design Boom)

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Explosive Insides: Fascinating Cross Sections Of Fireworks

Andrew Waits

Andrew Waits
  Andrew Waits

Andrew Waits

Normally you would be quite concerned if you could see the inside of any firework, explosive, or pyrotechnic device. But Seattle based photographer Andrew Waits has thrown caution to the wind and dissected different fireworks, creating a strikingly graphic series called Boom City. The result is something that is almost as beautiful as the fireworks are when ignited. The explosives turn out to be quite interesting indeed – columns of cardboard or mulched paper encased in colored tissue, or some delicate covering, and stuffed full of intriguing colored pigments. Resembling some sort of school science project, the fireworks look deceptively amateur, and certainly not something that can cause such serious accidents. Names like Flying Color Butterfly Rocket, Lightning Flash, Ground Bloom Flower, Moon Traveler’s Bottle Rocket, give the impression of fireworks being delightfully playful.

Waits quite often chooses subjects where he can study differences by comparing similarities. His past projects have included studies of people traveling in motor homes, living permanently on the road, and comparing the same site at both sunset and sunrise. Also having taken a series called Artifacts and Specimens, he seems to enjoy ordering and analyzing the things that surround us. Boom City is the perfect example of how Waits’ curiosity is piqued by examining the details of a particular subject.

See here for more of Waits’ beautiful aesthetic and interesting projects. And here is a video of drone footage seeing fireworks from yet another angle. (Via Boingboing)

Via Present and Correct

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