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Short Film “Shiloh” Powerfully Explores Self-Identity Using Dance And Colored Powder

Dreambear, Shiloh - Film Dreambear, Shiloh - Film

Gabriel Moreno, Shiloh - Illustration

Shiloh (2014). By Gabriel Moreno.

“Shiloh” is a creative short film that uses dance footage and bursts of colored powder to explore self-identity. Created by Brooklyn-based production company Dreambear with director James Hall, “Shiloh” is a unique and contemporary fusion of dance, film, and visual art. The short narrative begins with dancer Shiloh Hodges crouching and swaying ritualistically in a spotlight. As the music picks up, she rises and moves into a fluid dance while dust falls from her shoulders. With each beautiful flourish she throws colored powder into the air, which is captured in beautiful arcs by the slow motion footage.

“How can we present our identity through art?” the video description asks, seeking to articulate what makes art such a powerful outlet for self-expression (Source). Emerging from Shiloh’s own difficulty in exploring personal identity in the oft-competitive and critical field of dance, the short film wordlessly answers this question; with a powerful self-awareness, her body resists the surrounding darkness as it moves seamlessly with the uplifting music. The rainbow-colored powder she throws evokes a spectrum of emotions, from joy, to love and self-care, to a tinge of sadness. Accenting her skin are beautiful, drawn-on “fractures,” making it appear as though the coloured powder comes from within, symbolizing her internal, heart-based experiences.

Accompanying the short film is a portrait by renowned Madrid-based artist Gabriel Moreno. Moreno became a collaborator on the project when Hall reached out to him and subsequently produced the art piece featured in the film’s final scene. As in the film, depicted in the illustration is an overlay of multiple emotions and experiences; beneath the central portrait are different outlines of Shiloh dancing. As in his other works, Moreno uses bursts of color to dramatically punctuate the illustration. Together, the film and portrait explore self-identity across mediums, immortalizing Shiloh’s beautiful dance as a powerful fruition of creativity, talent, and strength.

Visit Dreambear’s website to see more of their exciting work, as well as their Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Moreno’s work can be followed on his website, Twitter, and Facebook page.

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Dines

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London based Dines is a graphic, type and interactive mono-named designer. Whether his designs are destined for commercial industry or for more personal musings, his bright, active voice rings loud, yet harmonious, through each project- a stamp of his personal design style. You can catch up with his freshest work and news via his blog.

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Nick Brandt’s Photos Of The Tanzanian Lake That Turns Animals Into Stone

Nick Brandt photography

Nick Brandt

Nick Brandt 2

In his new book, Across the Ravaged Land, photographer Nick Brandt features petrified animal remains found along a lake in Northern Tanzania that contains lethal levels of alkaline.

Brandt explains, “I unexpectedly found the creatures – all manner of birds and bats – washed up along the shoreline of Lake Natron in Northern Tanzania. No-one knows for certain exactly how they die, but it appears that the extreme reflective nature of the lake’s surface confuses them, and like birds crashing into plate glass windows, they crash into the lake. The water has an extremely high soda and salt content, so high that it would strip the ink off my Kodak film boxes within a few seconds. The soda and salt causes the creatures to calcify, perfectly preserved, as they dry.

I took these creatures as I found them on the shoreline, and then placed them in ‘living’ positions, bringing them back to ‘life’, as it were. Reanimated, alive again in death.” (via gizmondo)

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Behind-the-Scenes with “Art Works Every Time” Artist: Brian Willmont

above: Brian Willmont's Studio; below: "Long Gone" 2009

above: Brian Willmonts Studio, below: "Long Gone" 2009

Today’s Art Works Every Time interview is with Brian Willmont. His vibrant colors and energetic compositions command attention like a shot of tequila in the fluorescent glow of a Vegas dive bar. Read on to see more of Brian’s South West inspired “Clint Eastwood fever dream” works. Also, with just one week left to go before our exhibition, stay tuned for a new artist interview every day, starting Monday!

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Improve Your Sexting With NSFW Emojis

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If you’ve ever wanted to sext using regular emojis, you might’ve found this prospect difficult. Well, sexting in pictures got way easier thanks to the new Flirtmoji, a visual language designed to empower people of all sexualities to communicate their desires, concerns, and of course, flirtations. The often NSFW icons include anatomically accurate genitalia, whips, chains, fuzzy handcuffs, and even some sexually-suggestive fruit. There are also special, specific collections like BDSMS, Snow Bunny (holiday appropriate), and Safe Sext.

Flirtmoji was created by a group of designers and developers whose mission is to give people playful, inclusive, and functional sex emoji. In an interview with The Verge, artist Katy McCarthy explains: “I wanted the Flirtmoji to be sexy,” she said. “Even if it’s not my thing, necessarily … it’s someone else’s thing and it’s sexy to them.”

Regular emojis are criticized for their lack of diversity, and McCarthy and her friends were cognisant of that when designing. “My friends and I are not accurately represented in emoji,” she said, “and it’s frustrating. And particularly with sex, we felt that it was so crucial that everyone feel sexually represented.”

You won’t find these emojis in the app store. Instead, via their website, Flirtmoji has a selection of free emojis as well as themed collections for $.99 each. So, whether you’re an avid sexter or not, it’s worth checking out their icons simply from a design perspective. They show just how much can be said with relatively little visual information.

Nowadays, as more and more people express sexual desires through non-verbal, electronic communication, Flirtmoji is valuable. It’s a straight-forward, explicit, and fun way to have clear communication about this important topic. (Via Bustle and The Verge)

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Brazilian Activist Group Is Placing Billboards Of Derogatory Facebook Comments In The Neighborhoods Of Those Who Wrote Them

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A new campaign in Brazil called, “virtual racism, real consequences” is plastering Facebook comments that are racially derogatory on billboards in the backyards of their authors. The point of the project is not necessarily to call out anyone or expose anyone, instead, the idea is to create a greater understanding of how these comments actually affect reality. It is far too easy to hide behind the screen. By taking these words out of virtual reality and placing them within a physical reality, perhaps those who write comments such as these will be forced to come to terms with the fact that even their internet selves are an aspect of their real selves, and, that words on social media have an equal effect (if not a heavier one as they reach a wider audience) as words in person. One example of the billboards is a post the states “cheguei em casa fendendo a preto,” which translates to “I got home stinking of black people” (“Preto” is an offensive way to refer to black people, as opposed to “negro,” which is unprejudiced). The idea for the project was conceived after Maria Júlia Continho, the first black weather forecaster on Brazilian prime-time television, was the victim of hateful comments referring to her race, after she corrected another newscaster. The project, headed by the Criola group, a nonprofit that works to defend the rights of black women, uses location tags from Facebook photos to determine what neighborhood the person who wrote the post lives in. The group then buys billboard space in their area, and plasters the post, blurring the name and profile photo. (via Yahoo Finance)

 

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The Mystical Dreams and Mythologies of Ryan Samuel Carr

Ryan Samuel Carr is a native artist/illustrator of Ventura, California.  Ryan’s beautiful line work and dreamy figurative elements remain a constant reoccurring theme throughout his extensive body of work.  When I look at Ryan’s work, even if the subject matter is just the roots in a pile of weeds he always seems to capture a rare and very sincere moment only hinting at whatever secrets the particular root, or bed of flowers have to say.  Ryan’s unique line work evokes so much feeling and emotional manifestations.  Ryan shares a bit of his mark making process in this direct quote from the talented young artist himself:

“I think a lot about the ‘immediacy’ of drawing (with ink and pencils), and the individual mark in a moment of time; what that all says…it’s very mystical and meditative for me.”

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Nolan Hendrickson

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We are really enjoying Nolan Hendrickson’s recent work. They remind me of the dirty side of city life – but through a colorful, and naive window. The bold colors remind me of electrical signs that pollute the city at night. But the style of which Nolan approaches these paintings are so fun and dreamlike that it feels like I am experiencing these environments as a child.

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