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Audrey Kawasaki Paints Women With A Warm Glow, Inviting You Closer Into Their Strange Worlds

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The artwork of Audrey Kawasaki is completely irresistible in its portrayal of stunning technique and beautiful women. Her skilled illustration using ink, oil paint, and graphite is a sharp contrast to the natural grain of the wood panel in which she paints on. The warmth of the wood combined with the reds and oranges found in her work create a soft glow that radiates from her work. Each of her women contains an iridescent aura that invites you in, pulling you closer into the frame. There is an unmistakable seductiveness in their eyes, or in one case, the third eye, that is both intriguing and mysterious. As you examine Kawasaki’s work, something begins to feel peculiar. The beauty of her women blinds us before a strange, bizarre element creeps up on us. We slowly realize something is off, when we see things like pink, glowing rabbits circling around the figures or even a snake skeleton sprouting out of the roots of a woman’s hair.

Kawasaki flawlessly offers us women of quiet beauty that leaves us questioning each situation. She pulls her inspiration for her gorgeous paintings from both the distinct style of Manga comics and the swirling, elegance of Art Noveau. The enormously talented artist will have work up at a group show starting this June on the 26th at the Long Beach Museum of Art. Her work is included in the exhibition, Vitality and Verve: Transforming the Urban Landscape.

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White Noise, The Digital Sculptures That Mixes Fashion Photography And 3D Animation

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Fashion photographer Per Zennstrom & 3D artist Torsten Weese collaborate on a multimedia project, White Noise Shores, that juxtaposes 3D technology with old-school photography in order to create sculpture compositions.

These beautiful shots resemble human bodies that mesh with what seems to be the digital fabric of what makes the basic 3D animation. The stunning compositions are strictly rendered in neutral colors and, at times, its vague composition is reminiscent of early abstraction (in that it is not fully abstract since it is somewhat figurative).

After the real-life photoshoot, the 40-50 still frames captured were uploaded into the free AutoDesk 123D Catch software which allows anyone with an internet connection to create real 3D models of virtually any object. The software stitches the images together and produces a 3D model in about 30 minutes.

The model acquired through the AutoDesk was then“sculpted by hand” in Sculptris to refine and enhance the digital sculpture. The next step was to hand the model over to Thorsten Japser Weese and his team at Recom-CGI for processing and editing. The camera flight and the rendering for the ANIMATION is done inf VRED professional and the passes were comped in NUKE and got little FX in After Effects. The team at Recom rendered a number of stills, video and 3D models which were then brought back to Per Zennstrom for final editing in Premiere and After Effects.

(via Eternal Optimist)

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Illustrations of Pop Culture Figures Dancing by Jesse Lonergan

 

Illustrator and comics artist Jesse Lonergan is drawing a “Dancer a Day”. Every day, he draws an icon from movies, music, cartoons, pop culture, etc. in a “dancing pose”. He posts the quick sketches to his “Dancer a Day” blog. Just a really fun, loose project. Who doesn’t dig the image of a groovy Hannibal Lecter or a b-boy Gonzo? What about a super fab “The Dude”, or Godzilla and the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man cutting a rug on top of a metropolis? Some more selections after the jump and head over to the page itself, where Lonergan’s already amassed a pretty large collection of dancers. (via)

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Hiroshi Watanabe’s Photos Capture Japanese Theater Traditions

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Japanese theater Hiroshi Watanabe

Hiroshi Watanabe is a photographer interested in places and people.  Capturing traditions and locales that hold a personal interest for him, Watanabe was drawn to various elements of Japanese culture.  Particularly interested in forms of theatricality, Watanabe sought to capture individual performers within the traditions of Sarumawashi, Noh, Ena Bunraku and Kabuki.  Stylized human actors, monkeys, masks and puppets become the subject matter of Watanabe’s striking and powerful photographs.  Though the traditions come from different regions and periods of history, they are tied together by Watanabe’s eye.  Of his work he says:

“I strive for both calculation and discovery in my work, keeping my mind open for surprises. At times, I envision images I’d like to capture, but when I actually look through the viewfinder, my mind goes blank and I photograph whatever catches my eye. Photographs I return with are usually different from my original concepts. My photographs reflect both genuine interest in my subject as well as a respect for the element of serendipity, while other times I seek pure beauty. The pure enjoyment of this process drives and inspires me. I believe there’s a thread that connects all of my work — my personal vision of the world as a whole. I make every effort to be a faithful visual recorder of the world around me, a world in flux that, at very least in my mind, deserves preservation.”

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Artist Interview: ZANE LEWIS AND HIS SHATTER PAINTINGS

Artist Zane Lewis, an elusive and evolving talent, has reemerged within the New York art scene with a fresh and new aesthetic. When you stand before one his newest works, among the Shatter Paintings collection, you are presented with a kaleidoscopic garden of glass, a reflective playground for the eyes. With a minimal, neo-conceptual execution, his mirrored “paintings” offer a glistening ensemble of hued splendor. A discourse between notions of the “natural” and the “industrial”- due to organic reflections coupled with pre-fabricated found material- engages the viewer. Lewis also adds a twist to this aesthetic, in that each painting subtly renders human abstractions of life, death, and wraith of the intangible.

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Stephen Mattheu Booth

 

Stephen Mattheu Booth knows how to make a character worth remembering. I can’t say exactly what it is I enjoy about his characters, but they all just seem like they would be awesome to hang around with, and even his abstractions retain this figurative charm. I’ve always had an appreciation for this manner of art in which one can imagine the artist making these awesome drawings on a couch, or in bed, or at a bar, all without having to go to a studio and worshiping an easel, or using some computer tool to clean up his lines. It just feels right. And fortunately, he doesn’t draw fan artish mutated forms of Spongebob or Mickey Mouse, but instead, his work seems to sprout (growth being important here) from characters like Slimer, Donald Duck, Pluto, and other childhood favorites. How could you look at that #$!@*☁ duck and not smile?

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Christopher Janney Bathes Travelers With Sound And Technicolor Light

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Christopher Janney’s work often activates multiple senses simultaneously, using both visual and auditory stimulation to evoke emotional responses to viewers. Calling it a ‘sonic portrait’ of Miami, his work Harmonic Convergence combines sound, light and interactive elements to emulate a positive experience of place in an otherwise sterile airport environment.

Located in a pedestrian walkway leading from the car rental buildings to the airport proper, Janney replaced the existing windows with a prismatic arrangement of colored glasses. Columns and design elements were also repainted white, to better catch the sun’s lights streaming through the colored glass. This was Janney’s second installation at the airport, succeeding his previous piece, Harmonic Runway.

Like most of his work, sound plays an important part of this installation as well. According to Jenny Filipetti at Designboom, “Speakers installed at regular intervals along the walkway create a continuously changing ‘sonic portrait’ of South Florida as they play the sounds of tropical birds, thunderstorms, and other environments native to the region. Video sensors at either end of the passageway track visitor movement, causing changes in the density and composition of the sound piece relative to the number of passengers in the space.” (via designboom)

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Sponsored Post: Respect. And G-Shock Present- Aaron Stathum And Eliot Coven

g-shock and Respect.G-Shock and RESPECT. magazine have teamed up to showcase the work of some top, emerging art makers from across a variety of disciplines. The video series interviews four innovators: artist/sculptor Christophe Roberts, industrial designers Aaron Stathum and Eliot Coven and photographer Kareem Black. These individuals are exploring their own imaginations and finding new ways to their visions to life through their respective art forms. From sculpture, to photography to developing concepts for industrial design and products that improve our every day lives.

The industrial designs of Aaron Stathum and Eliot Coven are heart-warming, moving, and inspiring all at the same time. Seeing two graduate students come up with an ingeniously simple way to address the issues of clothes washing in remote areas or underdeveloped countries is positively energizing. Stathum and Coven designed their “UpStream: Developing World Washing System” while studying together at Philadelphia University. Their foot powered washing machine is built from materials that are easy to find the world over: a 5 gallon bucket, pipes and rope. Their goal was to make it easier for people to do laundry, cut down their laundry time, make washing more sanitary and keep detergents out of the rivers where washing usually takes place. This pair is truly inspiring and their simple solution to a worldwide problem will hopefully ignite a spark in others to follow suit.

Watch the full video featuring Aaron Stathum and Eliot Coven here.

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