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Troels Carlsen’s Warped Anatomical Illustrations

 

Danish artist Troels Carlsen warps classic anatomical illustrations of natural organisms to produce mixed media works on paper. I can’t tell if the drawings that Carlsen’s manipulating are originally produced by the artist or not (maybe a mixture of the two), but the images stand up well enough even without such information. On a purely visual level, the contrast between the illustrative anatomical drawings and Carlsen’s slightly humorous injections works really nicely. But these drawings hold conceptual tones as well. Thick commentary on the body and mind is laid out cleanly for all to see. (via)

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E-Rock

E*Rock “Dayglo Supernovea (Excerpt)” from Audio Dregs Recordings on Vimeo.

Digital Convulsions and Dayglo Supernovas by E-Rock.

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Dennis Hollingsworth

Thick abstractions and text based paintings by Dennis Hollingsworth.

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Andres Medina’s Haunted Photographs

Spanish Photographer Andres Medina has a knack for creating beauty with very little. There’s really not too much action in a lot of his photographs. Somehow, though, he frames such emptiness with beautiful lighting and technique in a way that amplifies the emptiness of the world in a really appealing way. Some of Medina’s best stuff is taken at night. You can almost feel the moist, cold air in his night photos, and your ears prick up as you are drawn into their silent world. The pictures celebrate our passive surroundings, as the lack of animated subject matter minimizes distraction. Some things are centered around such an internalized power source that you have to black out the rest of the world just to notice them.

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New work by Tim Lahan

Tim Lahan

Really digging these new celebrity/model mud-Michelin-Man makeovers by Tim Lahan. Also digging, across the board, gross-out illustration work as of late.

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Collages Mix To Meditate On The Female Psyche

Flore Kunst - Collage

Flore Kunst - Collage
Flore Kunst - Collage

Mixing an admiration for John Baldessari with her own childhood memories of cutting/altering magazines with her mother, Flore Kunst creates captivating collages from vintage postcards and magazines, while sprinkling a few contemporary clippings throughout. A graduate of Emile Cohl for design, Kunst’s eye for intriguing detail and clean lines is evident; however, it’s her creative visual juxtapositions that truly capture our attention most, allowing us to meditate on the female form and its signifiers from era to era– how it all clashes and confuses even the most contemporary culture and its psyche.

  

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Ryan Pavlovich

Photography by Ryan Pavlovich.

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Evan Roth’s Ink Fingerprint Paintings Track Touchscreen Routines

Evan Roth - ink

Evan Roth - ink

Evan Roth - ink

Evan Roth - ink

American artist Evan Roth is no stranger to subverting digital culture into progressive art. In the past, Roth has developed a wall of gifs for Occupy the Internet and hacked the internet cache to create self-portraits, both of which fit neatly into his artist statement of “visualizing and archiving culture through unintended uses of technologies”. Drawing inspiration from hacker culture and philosophy, Roth helped found the Graffiti Research Lab, which merges graffiti with technology via projectile LEDs, which he used to famously tag the Brooklyn Bridge in 2008. For his Multi-Touch Paintings series, Roth tapped quite literally into a newly universal habit among people fully plugged into the digital era: that of using touchscreen devices. Created by “performing routine tasks on milt-touch hand held computing devices,” Roth used tracing paper and an ink pad to turn impressions of each finger swipe into stark paintings.

Each of Roth’s ink paintings are named after the task they’re depicting, from an entire wall of levels from Angry Birds to Twitter and e-mail check-ins. By turning mundane procedures we make on a day to day basis on our phones and tablets into textural studies, Roth blurs the line between the corporeal and the digital. One can’t help but be reminded of fingerprinting for identification when looking at the paintings, drawing a connection between the all-encompassing nature of technology in modern society and the lasting effects that may hold over our identities in the future. With iPhones that now literally use your fingerprint to access the device, it seems as though Roth’s paintings are even more prescient now than they were when he first premiered them in 2011.

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