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Documentary Watch: Tabloid

Tabloid is everything you want in a documentary, a wacky, eccentric protaganist, engaging visuals and a few twists and turns. Errol Morris (GATES OF HEAVEN, THE FOG OF WAR) brings us a story that’s “the kind of thing where he finds an article in the newspaper about something weird or quirky, then gets interestedin it and investigates.” And if you’ve ever wondered about a snippet you read in passing, you’ll thoroughly enjoy Tabloid- about Joyce McKenna, the world’s first Tabloid Femme Fatale, a beauty queen with a high IQ and a bone to pick with the Mormon Church.

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HUH. ONE Zine

HUH. ONE Zine

HUH. ONE is a black and white zine released by HUH Magazine of an edition of one hundred. I have to say the photography featured in this zine is really awesome. Photographers include Chad Moore, Dana Goldstein, Gavin Watson, Jerry Hsu, Jonnie Craig, Kathy Lo, Lele Saveri, Patrick Griffin, Pawel Jaszczuk, Peter Sutherland, Sean Vegezzi, Bea Fremderman, Paul Herbst, Seth Fluker, Patrick Tsai and Young Kyu Yoo. Head over to their website to get a limited copy.

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Sébastien Lifshitz Documents Hidden LGBT Relationships From The Early 20th Century

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Filmmaker Sébastien Lifshitz began compiling vintage photographs of queer couples when he happened upon a photo album that he realized contained the life a lesbian couple. Intrigued by the visibility with which they claimed with these photographs, despite living in the early to mid 20th century, when homosexuality was less accepted and more hidden that it is now, Lifshitz filmed a documentary – Les Invisibles (2012) – chronicling the lives of LGBT couples born between the two World Wars. Lifshitz just released a companion photo book –The Invisibles: Vintage Portraits of Love and Pride – last month. These images capture a lifestyle that was largely invisible to the mainstream culture to which it belonged. Photography was a way for queer communities to be visible to each other and to document the lives they led, however invisible they were to the heteronormative culture of their time.

Of his collection, Lifshitz says, “I don’t know these people — they are anonymous to me. I can’t really even say that each person photographed into the book is gay, except when it’s obvious. What I like is that there are different levels of reading these photos — I would say three levels to be exact. The first one is the pictures of obviously gay single people or couples, the second is the pictures of people which can be seen as ‘undefined’ (we’re not sure) and the third level is the ones that are obviously not gay but playing with a gay attitude (cross-dresser, some ‘garçonnes,’ etc.). I love the ambiguity and diversity of these pictures. These photographs ask questions. I didn’t caption the photos because I don’t know quite anything about each of them (no name, no location mentioned most of the time). I wanted to expose them like the way I found them: without any information, like mysterious pictures.” (via brain pickings)

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Lorenzo Castellni’s “Air Collage” Places Iconic Paintings Into Contemporary Settings

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The art of air collage is similar to air guitar. You emulate an original and make it your own. In Lorenzo Castellini’s case that means taking the faces of famous painters and paintings then collaging them onto modern day figures in contemporary settings. The end result is a humorous take on these iconic images and a look at how they would fare in the present day. Even though the project is supposed to be satirical it succeeds in capturing the viewer’s attention by using almost universally well known paintings and placing them in different contexts.
Some of the lighthearted narratives include Van Gogh in various “ear scenarios” and The Venus de milo placed in a shell gasoline logo. The funny stories that emerge by manipulating these images is that art can be brought into the everyday realm and perhaps reach people on a different level. It also uses a childlike technique which plays on perspective and rearranges found images to make comment on the moment. Castellini will take a photo and superimpose the painted image onto that then take another photo of him holding up the collage.
The faces Castellini chooses are from famous paintings which range from Picasso’s les demoiselles d’Avignon to Hieronymous Bosch. These resemble street paintings where the artist pairs faces taken from found images with appropriate photographic gestures which include upper and lower extremities. Material wise it references copying and printing techniques bringing it up to par with today’s standards and practices. (designboom)

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Engineer Zachary Abel Creates Complex Geometrical Sculptures Out Of Office Supplies And Other Household Items

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His passion for mathematics has led Zachary Abel to create geometric, science inspired sculptures made out of random elements. Paper clips, binder clips, playing cards and toothpicks are assembled according to specific formulas.

From far, the round sculptures appear uncomplicated to achieve. In actuality, Zachary Abel uses small needle-nose pliers and a schematic layout. For the Impenetraball project, the ball is comprised of 132 binder clips. The round form is obtained by assembling the binder clips one by one following a flat pattern in order to get a hollow centre and a filled surface. The designs have been so popular the talented engineer had to make a guide on how to construct the binder clip ball on his blog.

Zachary Abel in his Mathematical sculptures series is willing to share his enthusiasm for maths; replacing paint and brushes with pliers and patience. ‘Geometry in particular fascinates me, and I delight in discovering hidden patterns even in the most mundane of objects.’

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Go Monster Project- An International Cast of Artists Bring Kids Wacky Monster Drawings To Life

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Frightening monsters, gentle monsters and funny monsters. The kids and artists working on the monster themed project  ‘Go Monster Project’ welcome any kind of creatures. This project raises awareness for children’s imagination as a mean to shape their adult personality and future.

Elementary students are asked to draw a monster, that’s the starting point of the project. No rules or conditions have been set. They are asked to let their imagination wander and to draw literally anything that comes through their minds. Once they are done, the drawings are transformed into paintings, 3D illustrations, animations; digitally or manually by mini-sculptures. The kids are able to see their creatures come to life, and most importantly they are getting the validation that their creativity, taste and talent is significant.

There’s no right or wrong. The fact that they won’t be graded or judged from their creations help the children recognize the power of their imagination. This project aims to encourage kids to grow their potential within an environment ruled by ‘like’ buttons and a permanent search for social approval.
The excitement shared is twofold. The kids are having a great time drawing and the artists are exploring their imagination by taking over the simple yet creative drawings into visually elaborated and detailed designs.

The ‘Go Monster Project’ has launched a Kickstarter campaign to help develop the project.

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Tony Orrico’s Drawings Test The Limits Of Physical Movement

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Since 2009, Tony Orrico has performed his Penwald drawings. Combining elements found in dance, theater and performance art, it explores repetitive movement for long periods of time, bringing drawing’s motion into peril with human physicality. The idea originates in finding a point when an act becomes more than just motor skills and crosses over into the creative process. In Tony’s case, this leaves an aesthetic mark on physical existence in the form of an abstract drawing.

After graduating with an MFA in Choreography from the University of Iowa, Tony joined Shen Wei and Trisha Brown Dance companies. As a principle, he performed in major cities around the globe, including Sydney Opera House. Both troupes known for an avant garde approach ensured that he was never far away from a serious art practice. When he was ready, this enabled him to use the experience he learned as a dancer and combine it with his passion for drawing. One of his first Penwald performances at Postmasters Gallery, NY in 2009, would set the stage for everything that followed. From there, he received an opportunity to perform at The National Academy Of Sciences in Washington DC, and  was soon taking his “Penwald” series to venues worldwide. He was one of the few selected to reappropriate performances from Marina Ambramovic’s retrospective, “The Artist is present” at New York’s Museum Of Modern Art, an experience he was honored to have.

His newest project, CARBON, further investigates the relationship between material, body and movement.  Again, testing the limits of physical, mental and creative capacity, Tony sleeps in a box of graphite broken off throughout the course of a day, from Mexican pottery bowls. The material is used as a metaphor for life and death. A few recent highlights include performances at The Metz-Pompidou, New Museum, BAM, and solo Exhibits at PPOW Gallery NY, MUAC Mexico and Shoshanna Wayne Gallery Los Angeles.

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Ralph Lagoi & Kate Lace



Artists Ralph Lagoi & Kate Lace’s
recent series entitled “Love Land Invaders,” is a portfolio of fashion, art, and “luxurious pop” set in some of Japan’s extraordinary love hotels. I feel like I am peeping in on some superhero’s intimate moment!

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