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Photo Contest Champs

Thanks everybody for sending in the photos! You are all beautiful people AND sharp dressers! Heres some glamour shots of the contest winners …

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Precious Dioramas Built Inside Tiny Sardine Cans

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Packed within the four walls of a tiny 6 by 10 centimeter sardine can, the miniature characters created by sculptor Nathalie Alony for her project Home Sweet Home are both humorous and poignant. Arranged in a massive grid, the artist’s sardine can dioramas serve as a metaphor for the confined apartments in which we nest. These intricate figurines—men, women, children, beloved pets—each exist within the limits of their aluminum enclosure, building complex family and personal universes that seem to operate independently of the outside world. Despite the isolation of each piece, together Alony’s cans form a complex network that wakes and rests as a unified community, separated only by thin, delicate metal.

Like strange dollhouses, these precious sardine can apartments allow us to navigate and to find meaning in the rituals of domestic life. Much of the action portrayed here is banal: the routine laundering of children’s clothes, the checking off of days on a calendar, the painting of walls. When seen in miniature, intricately rendered by the artist’s masterful hands, mundane home improvement tasks become endlessly enthralling. Here, we can be voyeurs in the most innocent sense, entering the intimate confines of the homes of others with tender curiosity.

Alony’s brilliant little worlds capture the lonesomeness of modern living; seeing the fourth aluminum wall pulled back to reveal precious, private lives, we yearn for a similar intimacy in real life. A home, carved out lovingly from a tiny industrial box, contains all the secrets and wonders of families that are not our own. What goes on in the cherished homes of others? (via Junk Culture and Lost at E Minor)

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Eric Perriard’s Urban Souls

Sure to put some bees in the anarcho-primitivist bonnet, I’d wager that mass urbanization is one of the prime inevitabilities of the twenty-first century.  Obviously, the emergence of the megacity will have a serious environmental impact.  But consider the psychological impact as well.  What does it mean to be isolated–or to simply find a place to be alone–when we’re all sardined together? Through a combination of chance shots and staged photographs, photographer Eric Perriard examines this idea of private space within urban landscape of Seoul, a city spread over a mere 0.6 percent of South Korea’s land, yet crammed with nearly a quarter of the country’s population. 

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Interview: Deep Slumber Lake

Deep Slumber Lake is an artist duo consisting of Todd White and Zachary Scheinbaum. Their imaginative wanderings into the ancient and epic themes of swordcraft, battle axes, and wizardry are grand in scale. These guys spent a lot of time in each other’s basements with 10 sided dice and Priest blasting on the record player. Overlaying this teenage-metal-shredder imagery is a beautiful sense of line work and composition. 

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Trash awareness project in Japan

Garbage Art Work Project
Does making trash bags cuter motivate litter-bugs to responsibly chuck their burger wrappers and soda cans into the patiently waiting heads of bags donning the faces of cute little rabbits and Sesame’s Oscar the Grouch? Japanese designers at MAQ Studio have started a whole “movement” around “playing with trash” in order to address and bring attention to the waste problem and how it effects the environment. To really reduce waste though, wouldn’t it have been better to just use recyclable materials to substitute for the dilemma of accumulating all these bags and not being able to do anything with them? I dunno…what do you guys think? Could this be more effective in Japan than it would be here? This sort of reminds me of those Novelty Bras I had posted about before…

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Jen Mussari

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Jen Mussari is a Pennsylvania native fine artist, illustrator, typographer, and maker of DIY handmade art. She is now at MICA in Baltimore working on her BFA. Check out her new series of hand printed poster series called Very Important Posters, which are a combination of  hand-drawn typography and minimal illustration to communicate varied messages.  These messages range from critical to welcoming, comical to concerned.  You can collect all eight on her ETSY store!

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Leif Huron


Leif Huron
incredibly captures his subjects in awesome vibrancy and beautiful tonality. Huron’s photographs are incredibly detailed and are a treat to the eyes; especially the portrait series. Done in high key, the color contrast of white skin and background to rich colored hair and strikingly deep colored eyes makes for one hell of an image.

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Peter Stewart Captures Dizzyingly Vertical Portraits Of Hong Kong’s Skyscrapers

Peter Stewart - Photography

Peter Stewart - Photography

Peter Stewart - Photography

Peter Stewart - Photography

Photographer Peter Stewart captures the pulsating neon guts of Hong Kong from a unique perspective. Standing at the bottom of dizzying skyscrapers and towering apartment buildings, Stewart offers us a glimpse of modern architecture as a force of nature. Each floor of the buildings he photographs looks like the ring of a tree, surreal in their orderliness.

In an interview with The Creators Project, Stewart explains how he chooses his subjects. “All it takes really is a keen eye for finding the beauty in the monotonous,” he says. “The everyday structures that we often fail to appreciate.”

The collection is called “Stacked – Hong Kong,” a fitting name. From some angles, the buildings almost look like life-sized Lego blocks. Oddly, the photographs do not impart a sense of claustrophobia, but rather a peaceful calm. The bright colors and little personal flourishes — a balcony-dwelling plant here, a line of fresh laundry there — are tell-tale signs of human life. It’s almost a little too calm — where are all the city’s inhabitants?

Still, rather than looking post-apocalyptic, Stewart’s portrait of Hong Kong is dreamy rather than dismal. It’s as though the city is asleep or simply waiting, holding its breath.

(via Design Boom)

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