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The Awkward Beauty Of Watching Complete Strangers Kiss For The First Time

kiss

When director Tatia Pilieva instructed couples to kiss, she did so with a twist. The two kissers are complete strangers, and don’t even know each other’s names. In this intriguing short film, aptly titled, First Kiss, we watch each of these people meet, realize they must smooch, and proceed to do so. Not surprisingly, it’s a little awkward for most of them, but when it happens, the moment is endearing and beautiful.

As you watch this three and a half minute video, there’s varied responses to what Pilieva asks. Some people try and make a joke out of it while others look nervous. One person introduces themselves. Finally, they all go for it, and the kisses range from a full-on make out to a shorter, more diplomatic kiss. It’s interesting to see how quickly people become comfortable with each other and are able to let go of their inhibitions to embrace the moment.

Aside from the charming concept, you might have noticed that everyone is nicely dressed and is conventionally good looking. As Jezebel and other media outlets have pointed out, this video is actually and ad for the clothing line, Wren. While it might be an inconvenient truth that no doubt puts a damper on the spontaneity of the video, it doesn’t totally detract from the pleasure we get from watching it.

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Sara Marjorie Strick

 

Texan photographer Sara Marjorie Strick‘s ongoing series Defining Mountains documents her experimentation with layering materials of dissimilar textures to create unique mountainscapes. More of her work from this series is shown below.

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Smart Billboards That Lend A Hand And Interact With Passerby’s

Ogilvy & Mather for IBM Ogilvy & Mather for IBM

Ogilvy & Mather for IBM

Rarely does advertising serve up such a smart, practical use of media like the new IBM campaign (designed by Ogilvy France). The intriguing billboards incorporate flat design in a 3-Dimensional capacity, building benches, awnings and helpful ramps to make the urban landscape a little bit “smarter.” By rethinking this simple medium, their message links the tech giant with innovation, intelligence and ingenuity in the physical world—a major feat of creative strategy. [via]

Watch a video of the billboards in action after the jump.

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Bovey Lee Constructs Whimsical Urban Landscapes By Intricately Cutting A Single Sheet Of Paper

Bovey Lee - Cut Rice Paper Mounted on SilkBovey Lee - Cut Rice Paper Mounted on SilkBovey Lee - Cut Rice Paper Mounted on Silk

Los Angeles based artist Bovey Lee uses one single sheet of Chinese rice paper to cut and construct her unbelievably intricate urban scenes. The winding compositions she creates with simple positive and negative space forms a topsy-turvy world of concrete jungles, mountains, and wild flora. Even the clouds present in her work are fantastical as they swirl around the buildings like smoke. Bovey Lee’s process begins with rendering the composition digitally on a computer. She then prints these images and hand cuts each little detail into creation. These whimsical, impossible worlds are so complex you can search through the cut paper for hours, noticing small details like a person balancing across a tightrope, or a city floating on a cloud in the distance. Even the trucks passing by have unique patterns on each one.

Bovey Lee explains that her work is full of tension between mankind and our environment; a power struggle between two forces. Her work explores the intensions and actions of humans and the affect it has on our surroundings. Lee’s process can be tedious and time consuming, but at the same time meditative. The artist further explains her relationship with working with cut paper. (via Faith is Torment)

“My work is like drawing with a knife and is rooted in my study of Chinese calligraphy and pencil drawing. Cutting paper is a visceral reaction and natural response to my affection for immediacy, detail, and subtlety. The physical and mental demand from cutting is extreme and thrilling, slows me down and allows me to think clearly and decisively.”

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Stina Persson

Stina Persson

 

Stina Persson is an incredibly talented illustrator hailing from Stockholm, Sweden. I’m a huge fan of her rich, full color palette paired with seductive, free-flowing lines. Even the way she handles cut paper is so sophisticated! 

 

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Artist Collaborates With Bees to Cover Sculptures With Honeycomb

Aganetha Dyck sculpture2  honeycomb

Aganetha Dyck sculpture5

Aganetha Dyck sculpture1 honeycomb

You could say artist Aganetha Dyck creates her sculptures as much as she fascilitates them.  Dyck uses honeybees to decorate these figurines.  The bees create graceful lines and countours that seem compliment the existing shapes of the figures.  Their honeycomb patterns don’t seem like strange additions but rather enhancements.  Dyck begins her process with figurines, often broken or damaged in some way.  Then collaborating with beekeepers and scientists, bees are allowed to add their distinctive pattern to each small statue.  Dyck describes her process:

“To begin a collaborative project with the honeybees, I choose a slightly broken object or damaged material from a second hand market place. I choose damaged objects because honeybees are meticulous beings, they continuously mend anything around them and they do pay attention to detail. To encourage the honeybees to communicate, I strategically add wax or honey, propolis or hand-made honeycomb patterns to the objects prior to placing them into their hives. At least I like to think my methods are strategic. The honeybees often think otherwise and respond to what is placed within their hive in ways that make my mind reel.”

[via]

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N.A.S.A-Strange Enough


What do you get when you mix N.A.S.A, Ol Dirty Bastard, Karen O, and Brazilian street artist Calma? You get this bizarre, cross genre mash up that messes with your head!

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Liesbet Bussche Accesorizes the City with Oversized Jewelry Street Art

Liesbet Bussche is doing some really creative, involved work in the street right now. I really like her “Urban Jewellery” campaign, which integrates over sized pieces of jewelry into public, urban space. Stone roadblocks become cufflinks. Pendants are placed upon chain barriers to create “necklaces”. The project exposes the city’s characteristics as highly individual, asserting that it is appropriate to accessorize public space in the same manner we would accessorize ourselves. It reminds us that urban areas have just as much personality as a living, breathing entity. (via)

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